Tag Archives: USMC

US F-35s arrive in Japan

The first US F-35 Lightning II aircraft to be based outside the US, arrived in Japan on 18 January. Jets belonging to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 121 touched down at Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni near Hiroshima, beginning the squadron’s permanent basing here. Interestingly, the journey from the US took the F-35’s over a week to complete.

The aircraft involved are of the vertical short take off & landing variant and within the United States Marine Corps (USMC) replaces  the AV-8B Harrier, F/A-18 Hornet and EA-6B Prowler. The USMC was the first to reach to reach Initial Operational Capability (IOC) on Lockheed Martin’s new fighter jet.

“The arrival of the F-35B embodies our commitment to the defense of Japan and the regional-security of the Pacific,” said Maj. Gen. Russell Sanborn, the 1st Marine Aircraft Wing Commanding General. “We are bringing the most advanced technology to the Pacific to respond to the wide range of missions we take part in and provide greater support to our regional allies.”

Prior to arriving in Iwakuni, VMFA-121 was stationed with the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing at MCAS Yuma, Arizona. During the squadron’s time in Arizona, the aircraft successfully participated in numerous exercises and training events. “Our training in the U.S. has prepared us well for our mission here in Japan and we are very honored to have such a warm welcome,” said U.S. Marine Corps Lt. Col. J. T. Bardo, commanding officer of VMFA-121.

No comment was given on why the flight from the US to Japan took over a week to complete.

F-35 heads to Japan for first ever operational deployment

Breaking news today, as the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II started its first operational deployment outside the US ever.  Departing Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Arizona, on 9 January, Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 121 headed for Iwakuni airbase in Japan, bringing along their F-35B short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) jets.

From Yuma and in the company of KC-10 tanker aircraft, the F-35s first headed for Elmendorf airbase in Alaska, from where they should continue to their new base Japan. Iwakuni is a regular destination for United States Marine Corps (USMC) fighter jets, but this marks the first time the F-35B is send abroad operationally and in fact marks the first operational deployment for the F-35 ever. The step can be regarded as a huge one for the F-35 program, the biggest and most expensive weapon’s program ever in history.

Operations & tests

In July 2015, VMFA-121 was the very first squadron to reach Initial Operational Capability (IOC) on Lockheed Martin’s 5th generation fighter jet. In October 2016, a contingent of USMC F-35B’s, pilots and maintainers participated in Developmental Test III and the Lightning Carrier Proof of Concept Demonstration aboard the USS America (LHA-6). The final test period ensured the plane could operate in the most extreme at-sea conditions, with a range of weapons loadouts and with the newest software variant.

China & Trump

The deployment was announced for this year earlier, but the apparent eagerness for the deployment comes a surprise. This could very well be to deter China from further venturing out in international waters, but also to show president-elect Donald Trump that the F-35 is perfectly capable of operational deployment. Trump, who is just ten days away from being inaugurated as the next US president, showed no sympathy for the F-35 in late 2016, hinting the US would be better of with more F/A-18 Super Hornets.

The year 2017 is likely to also see a deployment of US Air Force F-35s to Europe. The USAF reached IOC on the new jet in 2016. That same year saw US F-35s heading out to Europe for the first time, albeit not for actual operational flying. The purpose of that visit was taking part in airshows in the UK.

© 2017 Airheadsfly.com editor Elmer van Hest

Finland starts exchanging Hornet pilots

The Finnish Air Force and United States Marine Corps (USMC) have agreed about exchanging F-18 Hornet flight instructors. A Finnish Air Force pilot will work three years as an air combat instructor in the US and a Marines pilot will do the same in Finland. It marks the first exchanging of Hornet pilots for Finland, that has been flying the F-18 for twenty years.

The exchange will take place from August 2016 to 2019 and the aim is to develop the Finnish Air Force Hornet multirole (fighter/attack) instruction and national flight instruction system in unison with the originating country of the Hornets. In addition, the exchange procedure enables deepening know-how regarding the implementation and development of air-to-ground armament that´s integrated in MLU 2- upgrading of Finnish Hornets.

The Finnish instructor will serve three years in 3rd Marine Air Wing, Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron 101, based at 3rd MCAS in Miramar. His American counterpart will be based at Hävittäjälentolaivue 31 of the Karelian Air Wing at Rissala AB.

The exchange comes at a time that Heksinki is looking for an fighter jet to replace its Hornets. The F-18 Super Hornet is one of the candidates for the job.

Finnish pilots have worked as exchange flight instructors for BAe Hawk- training at NATO multinational flight training program in Canada.

© 2016 Airheadsfly.com contributor Pelttari Veli-Pekka

USMC F-35s to UK this summer

The United States Marine Corps on Monday 25 January stated it is sending two Lockheed Martin F-35Bs Lightning II to the UK this summer. The fighter jets will appear at two airshows in July, being the Royal International Air Tattoo at Fairford and the Farnborough International Airshow. The F-35’s appearance will make up for a ditched attempt two years ago.

The two airshows are both held in July and should also see participation of US Air Force F-35A variants. A total of five aircraft are expected to cross the Atlantic. The USMC reached Initial Operation Capability (IOC) in July 2015, whereas the US Air Force is still working towards IOC.

The attempt to send jets to the same airshows in 2014 failed because of a problem in the engine that grounded all jets. The grounding was the result of a fire in an F-35 at Eglin Air Force Base in June 2014. An appearance would have meant the international airshow debut for the F-35.

Dutch debut

Despite today’s announcement, it could very well be the Royal Netherlands Air Force (RNLAF) that debuts the F-35A on its first international airshow. In May, the RNLAF plans to fly one of its two F-35As to the Netherlands for noise tesing and an airshow at Leeuwarden airbase, although nothing is certain yet. More on the Dutch visit is in this feature story at Airheadsfly.com.

What is certain, is the presence of two F-35As in Europe already. They are two aircraft produced at FNM Aeronautics’ Final Assembly and Check-Out (FACO) facility in Cameri, Italy. The first of those made its first flight on 7 September 2015. The Italians will fly at least one F-35 transatlantic to the US next month and have no known plans for participation in European airshows yet.

© 2016 Airheadsfly.com editor Elmer van Hest
Featured image: The F-35B is a Short Takeoff/Vertical Landing (STOVL) variant of the F-35. (Image © Tom Reynolds / Lockheed Martin)

 

Search for missing USMC helos near Hawaii

UPDATED 17 January | Rescue workers in Hawaii are still searching for two United States Marine Corps (USMC) CH-53 helicopters and their occupants following an apparent colission between the helos over the Pacific on Friday 15 January.

Update: No trace of the helicopters was found until Sunday 17 January. The Pentagon has released the names of those missing, while the search continues.

The two giant CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter are part of the 1st Marine Aircraft Wing and are based at Marine Corps Air Station  Kaneohe Bay. Both were on a routine training mission when they  apparently collided just before midnight local time. Each helicopter carried six persons on board.

Debris is said to have been spotted, but no sign of survivors yet. Also, no mayday call was heard from the helicopters.

© 2016 Airheadsfly.com editor Elmer van Hest
Featured image: Two Sikorsky Super Stallion are missing off Hawaii. (Image © USMC / Sgt. Lillian Stephens)