Tag Archives: US Marines

First “new” Philippine C-130T finally made it

Later than we – and some say even the Philippine Air Force expected – the first of two “new” Lockheed C-130T Hercules aircraft joined the Asian country’s military this week.

The aircraft landed at almost midnight on 5 April 2016 on Brig. Gen. Benito N. Ebuen Air Base in Lapu-Lapu City at Cebu. A full Philippine Air Force 12 persons strong crew manned the aircraft during the four day journey from Tuscon, Arizona (USA), where the plane left on 2 April. The airlifter was actually expected roughly a month earlier, but what caused the delay is not known.

Travelling along legs

Herc 5011 was travelling along legs typical for so many other flights that were flown without in-flight refuel in the past: first a short hop to one of the airbases in California (to test the systems), then to Hickam AFB/Honolulu IAP on Oahu (Hawaii), followed by Wake Island and Guam before entering Philippine airspace.

220th Airlift Wing

At BGNEAB – as the home of the 220th Airlift Wing is called in short – the Hercules gets additional interior fittings before becoming fully operational. The wing already flies older B and H models, as well as the Airbus C295 recently acquired by Manilla.

Pasay City

The offical public blessing of the former US Marine Corps KC-130 as C-130T is planned for 12 April at Colonel Jesus Villamor Air Base, Pasay City.

© 2016 Airheadsfly.com editor Marcel Burger, based largely on PAF press release
Featured image: The first of two C-130Ts arriving in the Philippines on 5 April 2016 (Image © Philippine Air Force)

Press Play: Cold Response 2016 (2)

We already served you a nice dish of images of the big NATO & partners exercise Cold Response earlier, but the military photographers and the Norwegian military audiovisual unit have given us some more nice stuff! Press play and see more of the aircraft and helicopters that supported the 15,000 troops strong exercise in Northern and Central Norway, with even the Norwegian crown prince Haakon deployed, earning his tactical special operations parajump certification with the Norwegian Special Operations Command.

Featured image (top): US Marines, Dutch marines and UK Royal Commandos do an integrated air insert during a training event for Exercise Cold Response 16 on 3 March 2016 near the city of Namsos, Norway. (Image © Chad McMeen / USMC)


Norwegian Crownprince Haakon Magnus jumps with the Norwegian Special Operations Command (NORASOC) from a Royal Norwegian Air Force C-130J Hercules (Image © Forsvaret)
Norwegian Crownprince Haakon Magnus jumps with the Norwegian Special Operations Command (NORASOC) from a Royal Norwegian Air Force C-130J Hercules (Image © Forsvaret)

And off the Norwegian Crownprince goes (Image © Forsvaret)
And off the Norwegian Crownprince goes (Image © Forsvaret)
To get his tactical special operations jump certificate the Norwegian Crownprince Haakon also left a RNoAF Bell 412 in mid-air (Image © Forsvaret)
To get his tactical special operations jump certificate the Norwegian Crownprince Haakon also left a RNoAF Bell 412 in mid-air (Image © Forsvaret)
A RNoAF Bell 412 goes for a white-out landing during Cold Response 2016 (Image © Sofia Carlsson / Forsvaret)
A RNoAF Bell 412 goes for a white-out landing during Cold Response 2016 (Image © Sofia Carlsson / Forsvaret)
A Polish Kaman SH-2G Super Seasprite practising together with the Norwegian frigate KNM Thor Heyerdahl in Trøndelag during Cold Response 2016 (Image © Mats Hjelmeland / Sjøforsvaret)
A Polish Kaman SH-2G Super Seasprite practising together with the Norwegian frigate KNM Thor Heyerdahl in Trøndelag during Cold Response 2016 (Image © Mats Hjelmeland / Sjøforsvaret)

A Swedish Armed Forces NH90 - called HKP 14 in Swedish military service - in action during Cold Response 2016 (Image © Mats Carlsson / Försvarsmakten)
A Swedish Armed Forces NH90 – called HKP 14 in Swedish military service – in action during Cold Response 2016 (Image © Mats Carlsson / Försvarsmakten)

U.S Marines Cobra i övningsområdet. Foto: Jesper Sundström/Försvarsmakten #coldresponse2016 #coldresponse #svfm #usmarines #helicopter

A photo posted by I19 Norrbottens Regemente (@i19norrbottensregemente) on

A B-52 Stratofortress from Barksdale AFB receives fuel from a KC-135 Stratotanker assigned to RAF Mildenhall, England, over the Trøndelag region of Norway, while participating in exercise Cold Response 2016 (Image © Senior Airman Victoria H. Taylor / USAF)
A B-52 Stratofortress from Barksdale AFB receives fuel from a KC-135 Stratotanker assigned to RAF Mildenhall, England, over the Trøndelag region of Norway, while participating in exercise Cold Response 2016 (Image © Senior Airman Victoria H. Taylor / USAF)

Photo Feature: Cold Response 2016

About 15,000 troops, including 2,000 of non-NATO member Sweden, 40 aircraft and helicopters, about a thousand vehicles and several ships and boats are currently kicking a** in Northern and Central Norway. Exercise Cold Response included the taking of the normally peaceful village of Namsos, situated on the shores of beautiful fjords.

The 7th edition of the multinational winter war exercise hosted by Norway brings units from mainly NATO countries together, to show what they can as “bad” and “good” force against each other. To train for a possible real war scenario and to show NATO’s current strange “friend” Russia that the North American-European alliance still can.

The Swedes participating took the run-up to Cold Response very seriously, as you could read earlier here at Airheadsfly.com.

We selected some of the great images of this years edition made by Norwegian defence photographers for you. Have fun!

Featured image (top): From the back seat of a RNoAF F-16BM, closing in on the American B-52. (Image © 331 SQN / Forsvaret)

A F-16 from the Royal Norwegian Air Force taking off from Bodø Main Air Station to escort a USAF B-52 bomber over Namsos. The departure marks the start of the winter exercise Cold Response 2016 (Image © Gard Eirik Seter / Luftforsvaret)
A F-16 from the Royal Norwegian Air Force taking off from Bodø Main Air Station to escort a USAF B-52 bomber over Namsos. The departure marks the start of the winter exercise Cold Response 2016 (Image © Gard Eirik Seter / Luftforsvaret)
A short time later followed by a Belgian Air Component F-16AM (Image © Gard Eirik Seter / Luftforsvaret)
A short time later followed by a Belgian Air Component F-16AM (Image © Gard Eirik Seter / Luftforsvaret)
From the back seat of a RNoAF F-16BM, closing in on the American B-52. (Image © 331 SQN / Forsvaret)
From the back seat of a RNoAF F-16BM, closing in on the American B-52. (Image © 331 SQN / Forsvaret)
Hi Buff! Seen from the back seat of a RNoAF F-16BM (Image © 331 SQN / Forsvaret)
Hi Buff! Seen from the back seat of a RNoAF F-16BM (Image © 331 SQN / Forsvaret)
Once about to be axed due to budget cuts, the Royal Netherlands Air Force deployed Cougars both in the old camo as well as the newer overall grey paint scheme to Cold Response 2016  (Image ©  Torbjørn Kjosvold / Forsvaret)
Once about to be axed due to budget cuts, the Royal Netherlands Air Force deployed Cougars both in the old camo as well as the newer overall grey paint scheme to Cold Response 2016 (Image © Torbjørn Kjosvold / Forsvaret)
The Marines have landed, or almost, as this Sikorsky CH-53E is about to put some boots on the ground (Image ©  Torbjørn Kjosvold / Forsvaret)
The Marines have landed, or almost, as this Sikorsky CH-53E is about to put some boots on the ground (Image © Torbjørn Kjosvold / Forsvaret)
And there they are, as a small surprise coming from the USMC Sea Stallion, Royal Netherlands Marines in the Scandinavian snow ... looking fancy and all in their new ski goggles (Image ©  Torbjørn Kjosvold / Forsvaret)
And there they are, as a small surprise coming from the USMC Sea Stallion, Royal Netherlands Marines in the Scandinavian snow … looking fancy and all in their new ski goggles (Image © Torbjørn Kjosvold / Forsvaret)
And especially for those who like photoshopped blue skies (we don't discuss taste) here are the two Dutch Cougars and US Marines CH-53E navigating through the Norwegian landscape (Image ©  Julie Kristiansen Johansen / Forsvaret)
And especially for those who like photoshopped blue skies (we don’t discuss taste) here are the two Dutch Cougars and US Marines CH-53E navigating through the Norwegian landscape (Image © Julie Kristiansen Johansen / Forsvaret)
The crew of a Royal Norwegian Armed Forces Bell 412 at work (Image © Kristian Kapelrud / Forsvaret)
The crew of a Royal Norwegian Armed Forces Bell 412 at work (Image © Kristian Kapelrud / Forsvaret)
After dropping off Dutch troops, the Royal Netherlands Air Force Cougar takes off (Image © Annette Ask / Forsvaret)
After dropping off Dutch troops, the Royal Netherlands Air Force Cougar takes off (Image © Annette Ask / Forsvaret)
A rather gorgious image of a Swedish HKP 15 (Agusta A109) at sundown (Image © Kristian Kapelrud / Forsvaret)
A rather gorgious image of a Swedish HKP 15 (Agusta A109) at sundown (Image © Kristian Kapelrud / Forsvaret)
Photo flight of the naval battle group steaming impressively forwards (Image © Elias Engevik)
Photo flight of the naval battle group steaming impressively forwards (Image © Elias Engevik)
Norwegian and Beligan F-16s preparing for another mission (Image © Olav Standal Tangen / Forsvaret)
Norwegian and Beligan F-16s preparing for another mission (Image © Olav Standal Tangen / Forsvaret)

F-35: delivery rate close to four monthly

Delivery rate for the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II averaged close to four a month in 2015. In absolute numbers, 45 were delivered compared to 36 in 2014. The figure marks the highest yearly production rate of the 5th generation fighter jet so far.

The US Department of Defense accepted the 45th F-35 aircraft produced this year earlier in December. Among the aircraft delivered is also the aircraft was delivered to the Italian Air Force in December after being assembled and test flown by Alenia Aermacchi earlier this year. A production line in Japan is also gaining momentum.

“Meeting aircraft production goals is a critical stepping stone in demonstrating the program is ready for the expected significant production ramp up,” said Lt. Gen. Chris Bogdan, F-35 Program Executive Officer. “It took thousands of people around the world to achieve this milestone and they should all be proud of what they accomplished.”

Lightning II numbers

The 45 F-35 deliveries include 26 F-35A  for the US Air Force, eight F-35B and four F-35Cs for the US Marine Corps, another four F-35Cs to the US Navy, two F-35As for the Royal Norwegian Air Force and finally, the Italian F-35A already mentioned.

Most aircraft were sent to Luke Air Force base in Arizona, while others went to Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, Eglin Air Force Base, Hill Air Force Base and Nellis Air Force Base.

© 2015 Airheadsfly.com editor Elmer van Hest

Beechcraft UK order essential to keep T-6 line running

Textron owned Beechcraft is putting its hope on a fat order from the United Kingdom’s Ministry of Defence for its T-6 turboprop trainer aircraft, a company spokesman acknowledged. Beechcraft is about to finish the production of the 700-aircraft deal for the US military.

One of four T-6D Texan IIs delivered to the US Army in June 2015 (Image © Beechcraft)
RELATED POST: US Army fields Beechcraft T-6 Texans
Since 2000 the Beechcraft T-6A Texan II has been replacing the Cessna T-37B Tweet within the US Air Force, with 449 T-6s delivered. The remainder of the 700-aircraft US deal goes to the US Navy (T-6B) and US Marine Corps, plus four specially adapted aircraft ordered by the US Army.

The Beechcraft trainer has had success abroad as well, with versions flying with the NATO Flying Training in Canada (24 CT-156 Harvard II), the Hellenic Air Force (25 T-6A + 20 armed T-6A NTA), the Israeli Air Force (25 T-6A), the Iraqi Air Force (15 T-6A + 24 T-6C ordered), the Mexican Air Force (12 T-6C+), the Mexican Navy (2 T-6+), the Royal Moroccan Air Force (24 T-6C), the Royal New Zealand Air Force (11 T-6C).

Hopes
Now hopes are high for the United Kingdom, which sees the T-6 as the replacement for the Short Tucano in training both the Royal Air Force as well as Royal Navy future combat jet pilots; with an order in the range of 80 to 120 aircraft awaiting. As for new export customers: it won’t be easy for Beechcraft. The Pilatus PC-9 and PC-21 and the armed Embraer A-29 Super Tucano are very tough competitors, already having scooped up orders like for the Afghan Air Force that years earlier might have gone more naturally to Beechcraft.

Upgrades
There may be some other light on the horizon though. Upgrades of the basic A-model within the US Air Force, US Navy and Hellenic Air Force to C-standard are expected. The current C-model has a digital class cockpit with HUD, multi-function displays, HOTAS to access functions with buttons on the flight control stick and wing hard points, nice featured to incorporate on the A-model.

© 2015 Airheadsfly.com editor Marcel Burger
Featured image: The T-6C Texan advanced trainer (Image © Beechcraft)