Tag Archives: Tigermeet

Tigers are go!

The Tigers are go again! For the next two weeks, Konya airbase in Turkey is home to NATO’s Tiger Meet. However, this year’s gathering of tigers is noticably smaller than previous gatherings, with real-world events and other exercises taking their toll on the exercise.

Hosting the Tiger Meet is the Turkish Air Force’s 192 Filo, which nicely painted up at least two of their F-16s in tiger colours. Also taking part are F-16s from Poland, F/A-18 Hornets from Switzerland, Dassault Rafales from France, plus AB-212 choppers from Italy.

NTM 2015’te bizi temsil edecek yakışıklı 🙂 #192filo #192sq #tiger #nato #tigermeet #NTM

Een foto die is geplaatst door Alperen Taşkın (@bitingwolf141) op

Cancellations Many NATO tiger units had to cancel their participation over deployments elsewhere. Dutch and Belgian F-16s currently see use in anger over Iraq, while Norwegian F-16s have just started Quick Reaction Alert duties over the Baltic states. Furthermore, Norway is busy preparing for large scale exercise Arctic Challenge, a joint Scandinavian training exercise starting 25 May. Also absent in Konya are Saab Gripens operated by the Czech Republic and Hungary. They prefer next week’s Lion Effort 2015 exercise at Čáslav in the Czech Republic over the Tiger Meet. Nevertheless, the Tigers will roar over Turkey for the next two weeks. The Tiger Meet is scheduled to end on 15 May. Click here for an impression of last year’s Tiger Meet. See more Tiger stuff here.

Tiger tiger tiger 🙂 #konya #tigermeet #nato #192squad #kaplanfilo

Een foto die is geplaatst door Yiğit Çiçekci (@ltanspotter) op


© 2015 Airheadsfly.com editor Elmer van Hest
Featured image: A French Rafale in special Tiger Meet colours is seen here leaving for Turkey. (Image © C. de Flesselles / Armée de l’air)

AHF↑Inside: Austrian Tigers

It’s four past three in the afternoon in Linz, Austria, and Jürgen ‘Lucky’ Cirtek turns his eyes to the west, only to say ‘there they are!’ before anyone else does. ‘They’ are three Saab 105s, returning to Linz after a 2 vs 1 training mission, and Cirtek, he is commanding officer of the Düsentrainerstaffel, better known as ‘the Tigers’. The squadron is getting ready for this year’s Tiger Meet, but there’s also the regular surveillance missions to be flown, interceptions to be carried out and training to be done for aspiring Austrian Air Force Typhoon pilots. Welcome to the Tigers.

At the airfield of Linz Hörsching, it’s a hot day. “Air conditioning? Of course! ”, says Cirtek when asked if the Saab 105OE provides air conditioning to its occupants. The design may date from the sixties and the cockpit is all about dials and gauges, air condition the Swedish Saab certainly has. At Linz, the remaining 18 Austrian Air Force Saab 105OE aircraft – out of an original 40 – are still used on daily basis for operational tasks and training purposes. Austria has been using the type since 1970.

“Every Austrian knows the Saab 105”, says Cirtek as he walks the Düsentrainerstaffel hangar, where four aircraft are parked and a larger number are stored, never to fly again. All are in different configurations, illustrating the active roles the trusty type still has in the Austrian military. “This is the basic trainer version”, the head Tiger says while pointing to a Saab equipped with two ejection seats in the cockpit. The left seat is for the student pilot while the right seat is for the instructor. “From the left, all flight controls can be reached. So, when a pilot flies the Saab 105 solo, it will always be from the left seat.”

(Image © Dennis Spronk)
Instructor on the right, student on the left. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
(Image © Dennis Spronk)
In 2010 this aircraft was painted up in tiger colors for the anniversary of 40 years of Saab 105 in Austria. A new scheme is thought of for the 45th anniversary next year. (Image © Dennis Spronk)

Old skool
It’s old skool on the Saab. No fancy fly by wire, MFDs or GPS cordinates here. “It’s an aviator’s aircraft, one that requires contstant attention from the pilot. You really learn to fly on this”, says Cirtek, who himself has 2,500 flight hours under his belt, many of which were on the Saab 105. He was the designated airshow pilot for a number of years.

Student pilots come the Tiger staffel at Linz after basic training on the Pilatus PC-7. In two phases they learn the in & outs of Saab 105 flying. An any moment, four out of 15 pilots at Düsentrainerstaffel are student pilots, with becoming a Typhoon pilot as the ultimate goal. “Since 2011, pilots selected for Typhoon continue their training with the Italian Air Force in Lecce, flying the Aermacchi MB-339CD. There, they get used to things like the head up display (HUD), which the Saab doesn’t have. After that, they go to Laage in Germany to fly the Typhoon.” Finaly, they end up in Zeltweg, where the 15 Austrian Air Force’s Typhoons are located. Both the Saab 105s and the Typhoons are part of the air force’s Überwachungsgeschwader – or fighter wing.

(Image © Dennis Spronk)
Take off for a 2 vs 1 training mission. (Image © Dennis Spronk)

Intercept
The Saab 105 sometimes functions as an intercept target for Typhoons. But, interception of unknown aircraft is also a task for the Tigers themselves, albeit a difficult one. The configuration of the aircraft is the same as the training configuration. Cirtek: “We get to intercept aircraft, but speed and the lack of radar are issues. We cannot keep up with an airliner above FL390, and below that, it still takes a lot of ground controlled intercept (GCI) work to arrive at the target at exactly the right speed. It’s quite demanding.” However, the fact that Austrian Saab 105s have more powerful General Electric J85-GE-17B engines than their Swedish equivalents, helps quite a bit.

(Image © Dennis Spronk)
A General Electric J85-GE-17B engine… (Image © Dennis Spronk)
(Image © Dennis Spronk)
…. is supposed to be in there also. (Image © Dennis Spronk)

Variant
Next up in the hangar is an aircraft about to be fitted with an Adler 30mm gunpod, which makes it suited for ground support, a speciality that is trained twice a year at gunnery ranges in Austria. Also in the hangar is a VIP-variant of the Saab 105, offering space to a pilot and three passengers. No ejection seats in this one. The variants that do have ejection seats, are getting the old seats replaced with newer ones from Sweden. It is one of the few updates that limited funds allowed over the last few years. Work to replace some avionicis is also in progress, with one modified aircraft available at Linz.

Linz_Saab_Austria
Big hangar, small aircraft. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

Austria expects the Saabs at Linz to fly until 2020, however nobody knows what its replacement will be. The uncertain future could lead to experienced instructor pilots to look elsewhere, leaving the Austrian Air Force with a huge gap in training knowledge and experience. For the time being, Cirtek enjoys flying the Saab. “My most memorable flight was during the Air Power airshow at Zeltweg in 2013, when I flew as lead pilot in a 4-ship aerobatic display. That took a lot of effort by all involved, but it was very rewarding.”

The same joy will be felt during the Tiger Meet, starting 16 June in Schleswig Jagel in Germany.  Düsentrainerstaffel is a long time member of the tiger association, and their tiger adorned Saab 105 has been a familair sight for several years. “This one we’ve had in these colours since 2010, when we celebrated 40 years of Saab 105 in Austria. Next year, it will be 45 years…. so we are already working on some ideas”, says Cirtek with a wink, while behind him, the last Saab 105 is put in the hangar. It’s  seven past four in the afternoon, and that concludes one more day of flying the Saab 105 in Austria.

© 2014 AIRheads’ editor Elmer van Hest

(Image © Dennis Spronk)
Post flight checks start being performed. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
(Image © Dennis Spronk)
To the briefing room after the last flight of the day. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
(Image © Dennis Spronk)
Putting a Saab to bed. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
(Image © Dennis Spronk)
The VIP-version of the Saab 105. Note the normal seats instead of ejection seats. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
(Image © Dennis Spronk)
‘Gefahr’ it says on the engine intake, but danger is now lurking elsewhere. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
(Image © Elmer van Hest)
The Tiger Saab is be seen this week during the Tiger Meet in Schleswig Jagel in northern Germany. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
(Image © Dennis Spronk)
A sight for another six years: an Austrian Air Force Saab 105. (Image © Dennis Spronk)

Tigerrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr!

Tiger, tiger! Dutch 313 squadron turns sixty. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Tiger, tiger! Dutch 313 squadron turns sixty. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

FLASHBACK | Since Dutch 313 ‘Tiger’ squadron turned sixty in 2013 – when we originally posted this feature – and since we at Airheadsfly.com like cats and pussies in all shapes and sizes, let’s have a gathering of well known and lesser known Tigers of the past decades. Aircraft adorned with tigers – and as Tigers – have always been well received by aviation geeks and pros. And in case you didn’t know already: epicenter of the Tigermeet 2015 is Konya AB in Turkey, after Schleswig Jagel airbase in northern Germany served the tigers in 2014.

Perhaps the greatest Starfighter ever, wearing a special Tiger outfit. Unfortunately, it was also the last Starfighter to ever fly with Italy’s 21 Gruppo. But you probably figured that one out yourselves already. The squadron went on to fly the Panavia Tornado F3 and from there it moved onto Bell Agusta AB-212 helicopters. We won’t mention that ever again. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Perhaps the greatest Starfighter ever, wearing a special Tiger outfit. Unfortunately, it was also the last Starfighter to ever fly with Italy’s 21 Gruppo – but you probably figured that one out yourselves already. The squadron went on to fly the Panavia Tornado F3 and from there it moved onto Bell Agusta AB-212 helicopters. We won’t mention that ever again. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The French Etendards have a thing for Tigers. By their standards, these are rather boring tiger markings. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The French Super Etendards have a thing for Tigers. By their standards, these are rather boring tiger markings. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Not often seen are tiger markings on USAF aircraft. This 79th FS F-16C from Shaw Air Force Base was a welcome exception in 1997. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Not often seen are tiger markings on USAF aircraft. This 79th FS F-16C from Shaw Air Force Base was a welcome exception in 1997…. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
.... as was this KC-135E from 141st ARS, New Jersey ANG. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
…. as was this KC-135E from 141st ARS, New Jersey ANG. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Lakenheath F-111s once were prominent members of the tiger family. Less so for the F-15Es, although this one does look nice. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Lakenheath F-111s once were prominent members of the tiger family. Less so for the F-15Es, although this one does look nice. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Everybody knows the Belgians. No words needed. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Everybody knows the Belgians of 31 Smaldeel. No words needed. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
But who remembers this Slovak MiG-29, seen here in 2002? (Image © Elmer van Hest)
But who remembers this Slovak MiG-29 from 1SLK at Sliač, seen here in 2002? The aircraft crashed several months after this picture was taken. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Great Gripen! After the fall of the iron curtain, eastern European air forces started to appear at Tigermeets. The Czech Air Force is now a faithful participant. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Great Gripen! After the fall of the iron curtain, eastern European air forces started to appear at Tigermeets. The Czech Air Force is now a faithfull participant. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Who would have thought some two decades ago; a Polish Tigermeet participant flying Lockheed Martin F-16s. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Who would have thought some two decades ago; a Polish Tigermeet participant flying Lockheed Martin F-16s. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
French unit EC05.330 is hard beat when it comes to tiger colours. The markings on this Mirage F1B are quite simple, but effective. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
French unit EC05.330 is hard to beat when it comes to tiger colours. The markings on this Mirage F1B are quite simple, but effective. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Helos also do tigers, as seen on this Royal Nacy Sea King
Helos also do tigers, as seen on this Royal Nacy Sea King HAS6 of 814 squadron. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
More tiger spirit in the shape of a Royal Air Force Merlin. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
More tiger spirit in the shape of a Royal Air Force Merlin. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Over the last ten years or so, the Swiss started attending Tigermeets regularly. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Over the last ten years or so, the Swiss started attending Tigermeets regularly. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The French airbase of Cambrai hosted the Tigermeet more than once. This very colourful Mirage 2000C was based at this now-closed airbase. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
The French airbase of Cambrai hosted the Tigermeet more than once. This very colourful Mirage 2000C was based at this now-closed airbase. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
One of the best Tigers ever, if we had our say. Which we have, now. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
One of the best Tigers ever, if we had our say. Which we actually had, just now. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

© 2013 AIRheads’ editors Elmer van Hest & Dennis Spronk

NATO Tigermeet 2011

Czech Air Force Mi-35 Hind (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Czech Air Force Mi-35 Hind (Image © Dennis Spronk)

In 2011 Cambrai hosted the 50th NATO Tigermeet. Because of this anniversary and the fact that this French airbase was due to close the Tigermeet provided a last opportunity to visit Cambrai while still at operational status.

AIRheads’ Dennis Spronk went to hunt for Tigers and this is what he caught.
>>> Check full coverage here >>>

Royal Navy Merlin (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Royal Navy Merlin (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Portuguese Air Force F-16AM (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Portuguese Air Force F-16AM (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Turkish Air Force F-16C (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Turkish Air Force F-16C (Image © Dennis Spronk)
French Air Force Mirage 2000C (Image © Dennis Spronk)
French Air Force Mirage 2000C (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Polish Air Force F-16C (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Polish Air Force F-16C (Image © Dennis Spronk)
German Air Force Tornado ECR (Image © Dennis Spronk)
German Air Force Tornado ECR (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Swiss Air Force F/A-18C Hornet (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Swiss Air Force F/A-18C Hornet (Image © Dennis Spronk)
German Air Force Tornado ECR (Image © Dennis Spronk)
German Air Force Tornado ECR (Image © Dennis Spronk)
German Air Force Tornado ECR (Image © Dennis Spronk)
German Air Force Tornado ECR (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Break of Tornados (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Break of Tornados (Image © Dennis Spronk)
French Air Force Mirage-5F (Image © Dennis Spronk)
French Air Force Mirage-5F (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Spanish Air Force EF-18A (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Spanish Air Force EF-18A (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Czech Air Force JAS 39C Gripen (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Czech Air Force JAS 39C Gripen (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Czech Air Force JAS 39C Gripen (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Czech Air Force JAS 39C Gripen (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Czech Air Force JAS 39D Gripen (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Czech Air Force JAS 39D Gripen (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Czech Air Force Mi-35 Hind (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Czech Air Force Mi-35 Hind (Image © Dennis Spronk)

>>> Check full coverage here >>>

Photo sheet