Tag Archives: T-X

Raytheon to produce T-100 trainer in Mississippi

If the Raytheon/Leonardo Aircraft T-100 is selected as the winner in the US Air Force’s T-X program, the trainer jet will be assembled in the US in Meridian, Mississippi, Raytheon announced on Monday 24 October. The T-100 is based on the Leonardo Aircraft M-346 Master. Airheadsfly.com very recently flew the M-346 in Italy, with a complete report to follow soon.

“Our process determined that the best location for building the T-100 is Meridian, Mississippi,” said Rick Yuse, president of Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems. “It provides the right blend of infrastructure, proximity to our customers, government support and a talent base that’s ready for the high tech jobs critical to our success.”

Raytheon has manufactured products in Mississippi for more than three decades. The company manufactures Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) radars at its facility in the city of Forest.

The  T-100 is put on the market as an Integrated Air Training System that is more than just an aircraft; it is a complete training solution for aspiring fighter pilots, including ground based training systems. A similar philosophy is used by Leonardo Aircraft with its M-346.

Also entering in the T-X program are Lockheed  Martin and Korea Aerospace Industries (KAI) with the T-50, Boeing and Saab with a newly designed jet, plus Northrop Grumman with another new design. A decision on the winner is to be announced some time in the next few years.

 

 

 

 

Why Boeing plays its cards right with the T-X

Boeing this week gave itself a handful of exactly the right cards when it comes to the winning the T-X competition that is aimed at replacing hundreds of ageing US Air Force T-38 training jets over the next decade. Their solution is the twin-tailed, single-engined and apparently cleverly designed Boeing T-X, developed in partnership with Swedish Saab. The new jet may very well come out victorious.

It’s not often these days that a major aircraft manufacturer unveils a jet that was 100 percent designed from scratch. All eyes were therefore set on Boeing as the company revealed its T-X on Tuesday 13 September. Prior to that, only an artist’s impression and a few sneak peeks of the aircraftwere revealed. Boeing is producing two aircraft at first, which are registered as BT-X in the Federal Aviation Authority register.

Stealing looks
The result positively surprised many; a futuristic looking jet that however also steals some looks from the legendary F-104 Starfighter, especially when it comes to the front section. The rear more resembles modern fighter such as the F-15, F-22 and F-35. As a whole, it even looks remarkably similar to the new-ish AirLand Scorpion.

Stealing parts
And yet, the BT-X was actually not 100 percent designed from scratch and steals more than just looks for other jets. It steal the F-16’s front and main landing gear and internally uses many parts of the Saab Gripen. In the past, this design method was also succesfully used on aircraft such as the F-117. Commonality helps keeping development and production costs low and gives the jet an immediate edge over its competitors, being the Lockheed Martin/Korea Aerospace Industries T-50, Leonardo/Raytheon T-100 (based on the M-346) and the Northrop Grumman T-X design. According to Boeing, their BT-X can be produced and put together relatively simple, whatever that precisely means.

Yes, Lockheed Martin T-50 is an exisiting design and also should benefit from lower development costs, and the same goes for the T-100. But both are non-US designs, and the lengthy and unimpressive process that finally led to the US designed KC-46 over the existing European Airbus A330 MRTT as the US Air Force’s next tanker aircraft, proves Washington’s preference for US designs.

Boeing T-38 contract
The Boeing T-X is just that: a design mainly from a US contractor, with just the right amount of development to be done. Considering criticised projects such as the And remember, Boeing earlier in 2016 won a ten-year contract worth $855 million for updating T-38 trainer jets, the very aircraft the T-X will replace. It’s the perfect way to gain expertise and insight into the exact requirements of modern day fighter pilot training.

Engine
Also, Boeing uses the afterburning General Electric F404 engine in its design, as do the T-50 and Northrop Grumman T-X competitor – not to mention the Saab Gripen. The yet-to-fly Leonardo/Raytheon T-100 will use two Honeywell/ITEC F124 turbofans and is he only contender to use two engines and not use afterburner. That’s a problem for the joint US-Italian designed T-100 right there in terms of costs, maintenance and performance. Northrop Grumman meanwhile has it hands full with developing the new Longe Range Strike Bomber (LRS-B), also known as the future B-21.

The US Air Force’s new trainer should be fully operational in 2024 at the latest. A decision on which design wins the competition, is to be taken over the next few years. Boeing drew its cards right. No need even for a pokerface, it seems.

© 2016 Airheadsfly.com editor Elmer van Hest

Boeing & Saab unveil their T-X trainer

Boeing and its partner Saab revealed their entry in the US Force’s T-X competition on Tuesday 13 September. The Boeing T-X is an all-new aircraft designed for training mission and according to the design team incorporates the latest technologies, tools and manufacturing techniques. An afterburning F404 engine provides power.

The Boeing T-X aircraft has one engine, twin tails, stadium seating and an advanced cockpit with embedded training. The system also offers state-of-the-art ground-based training and a maintenance-friendly design for long-term supportability.

Both Boeing and Saab will use the two production T-X aircraft, revealed today, to show the U.S. Air Force the performance, affordability, and maintainability advantages of their approach. “Our T-X is real, ready and the right choice for training pilots for generations to come,” said Boeing Defense, Space & Security President and CEO Leanne Caret.

“It’s an honor to build the future of Air Force training,” said Saab President and CEO Håkan Buskhe. “We have created the best solution thanks to great cooperation and a clear strategy since day one.”

The T-X will replace the Air Force’s aging T-38 aircraft. Initial operating capability is planned for 2024. Other entries into the competition are the Lockheed Martin/Korea Aerospace Industries T-50, Leonardo/Raytheon T-100 (based on the M-346) and the Northrop Grumman T-X design.

Raytheon & Finmeccanica join T-X race

UPDATED 24 February | US defense company Rayhteon and Finmeccanica have formally joined the T-X race to develop and deliver a new jet trainer aircraft for the US Air Force, Raytheon officialy announced on Monday 22 February. Their proposal will be based on the M-346 Master currently in service in Italy, Singapore and Israel.

Update | A fresh report by defensenews.com indicates Textron AirLand will not bid in the T-X program.

Raytheon and Finmeccanica will further develop the FNM Aeronautics (formerly Alenia Aermacchi) M-346 into the T-100 jet trainer that prepares future pilots for high performance military jets such as the F-35 Lightning II. It’s cockpit is expected to share many commonalities with the F-35, such as a large MFD. Honeywell Aerospace supplies F124 turbofan engines to power the T-100.

Program

In the T-X program, the US looks for at least 350 of such aircraft to replace the current fleet of T-38 Talon jets, a type that has trained military pilots for decades and has seen several upgrades but now nears the end of its life.

An FNV Aeronautics M-346 at Lecce airbase in Italy. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
An FNM Aeronautics M-346 at Lecce airbase in Italy. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

Lead-in

The M-346 is used as a Lead-in Fighter Trainer (LIFT). The jet is capable of advanced training by using tactical simulation as well as datalink equipment. It can provide its pilots with a real time radar image provided by ground based or airborne radar systems, and it can replicate and attack threats on the ground and in the air. More on that is here at Airheadsfly.com. Poland should receive its first of eight M-346s soon and a ground attack version is being developed.

Candidates

The Raytheon announcement was long awaited and comes days after Lockheed Martin’s statement that it also joins the T-X race together with Korea Aerospace Industries (KAI). In Italy, FNM Aeronautics has been hinting at cooperation with a new US partner for many months, especially after General Dynamics quit an existing cooperation in March 2015. The Italians need a US partner to have any chance at winning the bid.

Also in the race jointly are Saab and Boeing, who aim to design a new aircraft altogether. Lockheed Martin has backed away from designing from scratch and now bets on a version of the KAI designed T-50.  Furthermore, Textron AirLand will probably propose its Scorpion jet or a newly developed variant.

The Pentagon is expected to announce a winner in the T-X program in 2017. A contract is worth roughly 8.4 billion USD. The T-X program is regarded as the last in a recent series of big US airborne defense contract. The Long Range Strike Bomber (LRS-B) program was another. Norhrop Grumman was selected as the winner in that race in October 2015.

© 2016 Airheadsfly.com editor Elmer van Hest

Lockheed Martin T-X contribution: the T-50A

Lockheed Martin announced that it will offer the T-50A in the United States Air Force’s Advanced Pilot Training (APT) competition, on Thursday 11 February. The T-50A was developed jointly by Lockheed Martin and Korea Aerospace Industries (KAI) to replace the T-38 and train the next generation of pilots to fly 5th Generation aircraft, such as the F-22 Raptor and the F-35 Lightning II.

Lockheed Martin also announced that it has selected the company’s Greenville Operations facility in Greenville, South Carolina, as the preferred Final Assembly and Checkout (FACO) site for the T-50A.

“The T-50A is production ready now. It is the only offering that meets all of the APT requirements and can deliver those capabilities on schedule,” said Rob Weiss, executive vice president and general manager, Lockheed Martin Advanced Development Programs (Skunk Works). “We carefully studied a clean-sheet option for the APT competition and determined that it posed excessive risk to the APT cost and schedule requirements.”

The T-50A. (Image © Lockheed Martin)
The T-50A. (Image © Lockheed Martin)

T-50 orders

The KAI T-50 has been ordered by several other air forces. The first Iraqi air force aircraft is now involved in test flights, and the first deliveries are scheduled for this year. Also Thailand ordered the T-50, as well as South Korea, Indonesia and the Philippines.

© 2016 Airheadsfly.com editor Dennis Spronk
Featured image (top): Artist impression of the T-50A. (Image © KAI)