Tag Archives: SAAB

‘Bulgaria selects Saab Gripen’

According to variopus sources on Wednesday 26 April, Bulgaria has selected the Saab Gripen to replace its small fleet of ageing MiG-29 fighter aircraft. The Swedish over topped that of Portugal for used F-16s, as well as an Italian offer for second hand Eurofighter Typhoons.

A special committee is to start negotiations with Sweden for a deal involving Saab Gripen C and D fighter jets, at a total estimated cost of 836 million USD. Off set orders are likely part of the deal.

Bulgaria now operates about a dozen MiG-29 aircraft, which were modernized over the last years to meet NATO standards. Also, the country recently ordered additional engines from Russia in an effort the extend the MiG-29’s service life.

Bulgaria has been on the market for a replacement fighter aircraft for a number of years. Neighbouring Romania has opted for second hand F-16s from Portugal to replace even older MiG-21s.

© 2017 Airheadsfly.com editor Elmer van Hest
Featured image: A Saab Gripen on patrol. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

Second Boeing & Saab TX trainer flies

Boeing and partner Saab have completed the first flight of their second TX aircraft, which they hope in the future will replace hundreds of T-38 Talon trainer jet in the US Air Force. 

Boeing and Saab’s TX was designed specifically for the US Air Force advanced pilot training requirement. During the one-hour flight, lead test pilot Steve Schmidt and Boeing test pilot Matt Giese validated key aspects of the aircraft and further demonstrated the low-risk and performance of the design, proving its repeatability in manufacturing. Both pilots trained for the flight using the complete Boeing T-X system, which includes ground-based training and simulation.

“The jet handled exactly like the first aircraft and the simulator, meeting all expectations,” said Giese. “The front and back cockpits work together seamlessly and the handling is superior.”

Boeing and Saab revealed their design in September 2016 and flew the first aircraft last December. Initial operating capability is planned for 2024. Also in the TX competition are Lockheed Martin and Korea Aerspace Industries with their T-50, plus Italian company Leonardo with their T-100.

Swedish aviation icon SAAB turns 80 years, going strong

The Swedish aviation icon SAAB is celebrating its birthday on 2 April. In 1937 the company was founded after a decision by the Swedish parliament to have the country produce its own aircraft. Eighty years later the military aircraft made in Linköping are more popular then ever.

The newest combat aircraft made in Sweden is in service with five nations: Sweden, Hungary, the Czech Republic, South Africa and Thailand. Two more nations will be flying the JAS 39 Gripen soon: Brazil and Slovakia; with Brazilian Embraer will even to produce the new and larger E-version supported by Saab engineers and technology. While the plant in Linköping will manufacture 60 of the Gripen E for its own Flygvapnet.

We at Airheadsfly.com say “Stort grattis på födelsedagen” (Happy birthday) Saab with a photo essay.

© 2017 Airheadsfly.com editor Marcel Burger
Featured image (top): Frontal view of the legendary Saab Draken
(Image © Marcel Burger)

Royal Danish Air Force (Flyvevåbnet) Saab T-17 (MFI-17 Supporter) training aircraft at Fliegerhorst Wittmundhafen (Wittmund AB), Niedersachsen, Germany (Deutschland). The aircraft with serial T-428 serves with the Flight School (Flyveskolen) at Karup. (Image © Marcel Burger)
Royal Danish Air Force (Flyvevåbnet) Saab T-17 (MFI-17 Supporter) training aircraft at Fliegerhorst Wittmundhafen (Wittmund AB), Niedersachsen, Germany (Deutschland). The aircraft with serial T-428 serves with the Flight School (Flyveskolen) at Karup. (Image © Marcel Burger)
We’re on top of a lot of Saab Gripen news lately, but at AIRheads↑FLY we’re sure not to forget the original Saab – at least in our eyes: the Draken. It needs no words. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Saab S 100B Argus AEW&C aircraft of the Flygvapnet (Swedish Air Force), reg. no. 100002, with the Erieye radar (Image © Marcel Burger)
Saab S 100B Argus AEW&C aircraft of the Flygvapnet (Swedish Air Force), reg. no. 100002, with the Erieye radar (Image © Marcel Burger)
A Saab Gripen on patrol. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
A Saab Gripen on patrol. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Saab Gripens at Lion Effort 2015 (Image © Martin Král)
Saab Gripens at Lion Effort 2015 (Image © Martin Král)
An Austrian Saab 105 training aircraft in cool tiger livery (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The "office" of a Gripen C pilot (Image © Saab AB)
The “office” of a Gripen C pilot (Image © Saab AB)
A Czech Gripen on alert on Iceland (Image © Tomáš Maruščák)
A Swedish Air Force SAAB SK 60 after landing (Image © Marcel Burger)
A Swedish Air Force SAAB SK 60 after landing (Image © Marcel Burger)
The end is near for the Saab 2000 in Braathens service. Seen here landing at Stockholm-Arlanda in March 2015 (Image © Marcel Burger)
The end is near for the Saab 2000 in Braathens service. Seen here landing at Stockholm-Arlanda in March 2015 (Image © Marcel Burger)
Saab 91D Safir in the historic livery of the Rijksluchtvaartschool Holland. (Image © Marcel Burger)
Saab 91D Safir in the historic livery of the Rijksluchtvaartschool Holland. (Image © Marcel Burger)
Sweden is famous for its candy. Here's some eye candy in the shape of a Saab Sk37E Viggen. Nothing sweet about that, however. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Sweden is famous for its candy. Here’s some eye candy in the shape of a Saab Sk37E Viggen. Nothing sweet about that, however. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
A restored Viggen flying from Linköping (Image © Elmer van Hest)
20140220_CASLAV_JAS39C_9238_FRONT-1024x682
Saab Gripen: a work of art and a Czech prize fighter. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Roll-out of the new, more capable Gripen E in May 2016 (Image © Saab)
Roll-out of the new, more capable Gripen E in May 2016 (Image © Saab)
Saab coops with Boeing on the possible future T-X advanced trainer for the US Air Force. It may even replace the SAAB SK60 of the Swedish Air Force (Image © Boeing)
Saab coops with Boeing on the possible future T-X advanced trainer for the US Air Force. It may even replace the SAAB SK60 of the Swedish Air Force (Image © Boeing)
Take-off! (Image © Louise Levin / Försvarsmakten)
Take-off! (Image © Louise Levin / Försvarsmakten)
One of the two US Air Force B-52s in formation with Swedish Air Force SAAB JAS 39 Gripen jets passing by the USS San Antonio off the coast of Southern Sweden on 13 June 2015 (Image © US Navy)
One of the two US Air Force B-52s in formation with Swedish Air Force SAAB JAS 39 Gripen jets passing by the USS San Antonio off the coast of Southern Sweden on 13 June 2015 (Image © US Navy)
For a long time Saab's first jet aircraft was the only Swedish made combat jet ever to have been deployed during war, when it was supporting the UN forces in Congo in the 1960s. The current Gripen has seen action over Libya. (Image © Marcel Burger)
For a long time Saab’s first jet aircraft was the only Swedish made combat jet ever to have been deployed during war, when it was supporting the UN forces in Congo in the 1960s. The current Gripen has seen action over Libya. (Image © Marcel Burger)
A SAAB J32B Lansen taking off from Linköping Malmen. (Image © Marcel Burger)
A SAAB J32B Lansen taking off from Linköping Malmen. (Image © Marcel Burger)
A very cool frontal view of a Saab 2000 Erieye AEW&C showing off its missile defense suite (Image © Peter Liander / Saab AB)
A very cool frontal view of a Saab 2000 Erieye AEW&C showing off its missile defense suite (Image © Peter Liander / Saab AB)

India and Saab: confidence in Tejas

Despite continued criticism on the jet’s performance, India still seems to have enough confidence in its indigenous Tejas fighter jet to open up a second production line. Meanwhile, Swedish Saab is offering its Airborne Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) radar to be installed in the Tejas.

The government in New Delhi has just cleared a 200 million USD investment to open up a second Tejas production line next to the existing one at Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL). The news was announced on this week at the Aero India airshow in Bengaluru.

The Tejas jets produced, will solely be used the Indian Air Force, since the Indian Navy has rejected the naval variant and is now looking for 57 new fighter jets elsewhere. The Dassault Rafale and Boeing F/A-18 Super Hornet are likely candidates.

Saab hopes to sell the Indians its Gripen fighter jets instead. Possibly to win Indian harts, the Swedes now also offer their Airborne Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) radar plus an additional  electronic warfare suite for use in the Tejas.

Celebrating the Viggen

It’s not regularly that we celebrate aviation milestones at Airheadsfly.com. In fact we only did it once before and back then, it was the 40th birthday of the F-16 that was cause for celebrations. But when a legendary fighter jet such as the Saab Viggen turns 50 years of age, we gladly make an exception again. Time to dig up a few images – old & new! – of this  prime and impressive example of Swedish aviation ingenuity.

The Viggen first flew on 8 February 1967 by the hands of Saab chief test pilot Erik Dahlström. The flight lasted 43  minutes, during which the jet performed as expected. In 1968, Stockholm ordered 175 jets, the first of which were delivered in 1971. The typical Viggen shape, dominated by the huge wings and the canards in front of it, became a familiar sight in Swedish skies – but not elsewhere.

The Viggen was successful in Sweden, which eventually made use of no less than 329 aircraft. But competing against – yes! – the F-16 on the international fighter jet market proved to be a bridge too far for the Swedish design, which was very practical but lacked the manoeuvrability and impressive  thrust to weight ratio of the F-16.

The last of the Swedish Viggens were retired in 2007. Despite never being used by air forces outside Sweden, quite a number of Viggens are currently preserved in European aviation museums. One aircraft keeps gracing the skies as part of the Swedish Air Force Historic Flight.

© 2017 Airheadsfly.com editor Elmer van Hest

A prototype Viggen is preserved in the Flygvapenmuseum (Air Force Museum) in Malmslätt.(Image © Elmer van Hest)
Sweden is famous for its candy. Here's some eye candy in the shape of a Saab Sk37E Viggen. Nothing sweet about that, however. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Two-seater Viggens were mostly used for electronic warfare towards the end of the Viggen’s career. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
A classic interceptor Viggen, seen at Ronneby airbase in southern Sweden. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
This Viggen was painted red to celebrate its retirement. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The Viggen’s shape could appear weird… (Image © Elmer van Hest)
…or beautiful! (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The Swedish Air Force Historic Flight Viggen. (Image © Elmer van Hest)