Tag Archives: Red Flag

Impressive Indian stop over in Portugal

Portugal welcomed some rare birds last week, as four Indian Sukhoi Su-30 Flankers and four Sepecat Jaguars landed at Beja airbase. The fighter jets were accompanied by two Ilyushin Il-78 tanker aircraft and two C-17 Globemasters whole on their long, long way to Alaska for exercise Red Flag.

India is sending the aircraft plus a contingent of 150 personnel to the prestigious military exercise within the framework of military cooperation between New Delhi and Washington. The last time India attended Red Flag was in 2008. Then, only Su-30s were involved and the stage was not Alaska, but Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada.
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Red Flag

Red Flag features aircraft from the US and other NATO countries and provides an opportunity for the Indian Air Force to train  in complex war environments. Aircraft such as the F-22 Raptor and other fighter jet will be involved and thus provide a good experience for Indian Jaguar pilots and Su-30 crews in particular.

The ferry of the aircraft from India to Alaska was a complex operation. The jets and their support aircraft routed via Bahrain, Egypt, France and Portugal, from where they crossed the Atlantic to Canada before finally arriving in Alaksa for Red Flag.

© 2016 Airheadsfly.com contributor Jorge Ruivo – www.cannontwo.blogspot.pt
Featured image (top):  An Indian Air Force Jaguar on finals at Beja. (Image ©
Rafael Vieira)

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Safe, saver, simulation

A 4th generation fighter jet can cost 50,000 euro to fly per hour. That’s a lot of cash. More advanced missions are flown by four-ships. That’s 200k per flying hour. Then they need someone to fight.  That means a second 4-ship: 400k.

Nick Graham is a former Royal Air Force Tornado and Typhoon pilot who also flew F-16s with the Royal Danish Air Force. He’s is currently an instructor pilot, training future jet pilots in the United Arab Emirates. This is his second blog on Airheadsfly.com. Interested in reading Nick's first? Find it here.
Nick Graham is a former Royal Air Force Tornado and Typhoon pilot who also flew F-16s with the Royal Danish Air Force. He’s is currently an instructor pilot, training future jet pilots in the United Arab Emirates. Find Nick’s earlier blogs at Airheadsfly.com here.
Add air-to-air refuelling, a ground based target to drop a weapon on, chaff, flares plus some more fancy stuff and the bill is easily at 500k per hour. Some high end missions cost 1 million euro. It’s easy to see how suddenly the cost becomes quite crippling. If that training can be flown in a simulator for “mere” thousands, it is easy to understand the huge advances the synthetic world offers. So how real can it get? Simulators have limits. G-force, how a radar will actually react to jamming or chaff, difficulty in finding a target coming at you from the sun, the reality that you can die if you mess up, the big entrance door at the back of the simulator dome which means you’ll never see the hostile in your deep 6, the play of light and shadow and how it helps or hinders you in making an ID of a ground target. The list is long, so other than saving money, what can the simulator do for us?

Practice Red Flag

Well, first of all, simulators can be linked up just like any on-line game. You can fly as a linked 4-ship and your friends will be seen from your sim dome (although there are no pilots to show hand-signals etc). You can fly in close formation, refuel off a tanker (nowhere near as tricky as the real thing), and fly anywhere in the world. We used to practice Red Flag missions before going to Nevada for real just to get used to the departure and recovery procedures. You can do the same for any war zone you can imagine.

Fight against a Flanker

The biggest positive for the simulated world though is the ease of manipulation. To get a real Su-27 to fight against is tricky. To get to fight against a Flanker with no restrictions, unless in real conflict, is never going to happen. In the simulated world, a click of the mouse can plonk 4 of them (or more) wherever you want. You can give them a skill capability and let them test your tactics on their own, or you can have a second operator control them to test a specific skill if you wish.

Night flying

Night flying is probably the way we would fight at the start of a war. If your squadron is training during daylight at the time (eg they are practicing dogfighting), you can keep current in certain night procedures using the sim without having to keep you engineering team in work for 20 hours. The UK has poor weather at times of the year. The simulator is used to renew instrument ratings with the examiner able to change the weather to force the pilot under test to fly the approach he wants to see. The examiner can make the weather below limits to see what actions the pilot will take when he can’t see the runway.

A very convincing digital flying world is created, with possible scenarios taking place anywhere. (Image © TSC)
A very convincing digital flying world can be created, with possible scenarios taking place anywhere. (Image © TSC)

Tactics

And now onto tactics. Simulators can be loaded with flight models of actual missiles and radar software. Tactics can be flown against smart hostiles who shoot back. Pulling the trigger and seeing a missile fly off the wing is excellent training, not least when you watch your wingman shoot. You know he has fired rather than relying on his radio calls. You can see hostile missiles flying towards you from a variety of threat systems and practise how to defeat them. Once all this flying is done, the simulator can play back what happened. A full mission can be watched on large cinema screens. Flight leads will check to make sure that what was there was actually found by his team’s radars and targeted properly. As an instructor, you can fly and then save a manoeuvre and then sit your student in the cockpit and they can watch what you did over and over again and then copy it. The demo is the same for every student.

Like Star Wars: a Full Mission Simulator. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Like Star Wars: a Full Mission Simulator. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

Emergency

And then the final use, the one pilots don’t like the sim for: emergency handling. As a fighter pilot, you are drilled in emergency actions for every month of your flying career. Immediate actions must be known or else you lose your privilege to fly. Fighters are the formula one of flying machines. They are at the limit of engineering. They break. We are tested hard for an hour every month with head scratching puzzles. If you don’t work out the problem fast enough, you lose the jet. It’s excellent training and certainly saved my skin on a mission over Libya when my jet had a system failure. But that’s another story.

Air Force core capabilities

There is a second element to be considered. It is easy to find out what a country has equipped its air force with. Airshows have become huge trade events with big deals announced to the media to reassure stockholders that their chosen aerospace company is doing great business. Not just airframes, but avionics and weapons. These core capabilities drive how an air force can fight. They help us build and develop tactics. We practice those tactics in vast training areas. We sometimes use encrypted radios to talk to our radar controllers and formation members, but often our communications are “in the clear”.

The F-35 comes as one-seater only, making the need for simulators even bigger (Image © US Air Force)
The F-35 comes as one-seater only, making the need for simulators even bigger (Image © US Air Force)

Real-time radar

It is easy for the average member of the public to watch near real-time radar feeds of our fights and listen to our radio work on their computers. It takes very little to work out some of our tactics. We must be careful to keep our tactics secret. A simulator allows us to fight as we would for real, in secret. With new stealthy jets like the F-35 coming into service and the need to protect their tactical secrets, the age of the simulator is well upon us.

© 2015 Airheadsfly.com contributor Nick Graham
Featured image (top): Take flight while staying on the ground; an simulator can get as real as it gets. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

Full Mission Simulators provide an almost 360 degrees field of view. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Full Mission Simulators provide an almost 360 degrees field of view. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

Norwegian Vipers in Red Flag 15-2

The Royal Norwegian Air Force has joined the large-scale air combat exercise Red Flag 15-2 in the Nevada desert this week. Ten Lockheed Martin (General Dynamics) F-16AM/BM Fighting Falcon jets and two Lockheed C-130J Hercules aircraft landed at Nellis Air Force Base in Las Vegas.

The operations are supported by about 200 men and women of the RNoAF. By letting half of the Norwegian tactical airlift fleet participating the Norwegians are trying to boost the capabilities of its transport crews in modern scenarios. “It is the most valuable training in complex air operations,” major Rune Johansen of the Hercules 335 Squadron was quoted by the Norwegian Defence media centre.

Norway planned to participate in one of the Red Flag exercises in 2011, but that was cancelled due to the air war over Libya. With all planes on the ground in Las Vegas, it is the first time the Royal Norwegian Air Force participates since 2009. On an average day the Red Flag exercise keeps 60 aircraft airborne and engaged at the same time.

© 2015 Airheadsfly.com editor Marcel Burger, based on source information provided by the Norwegian Ministry of Defence

↑ Check our full overview of the Royal Norwegian Air Force

RNoAF F-16s arriving at Nellis for Red Flag 15-2 (Image © Luftforsvaret / Forsvarets mediesenter)
RNoAF F-16s arriving at Nellis for Red Flag 15-2 (Image © Luftforsvaret / Forsvarets mediesenter)
RNoAF Major Egil Angell-Jacobsen clocked its 3000th F-16 flight hour while flying from Norway to Nellis. His reward was waiting for him (Image © Luftforsvaret / Forsvarets mediesenter)
RNoAF Major Egil Angell-Jacobsen clocked its 3000th F-16 flight hour while flying from Norway to Nellis. His reward was waiting for him (Image © Luftforsvaret / Forsvarets mediesenter)
Tiger Tiger in the Nevada desert (Image © Luftforsvaret / Forsvarets mediesenter)
Tiger Tiger in the Nevada desert (Image © Luftforsvaret / Forsvarets mediesenter)

Photo Essay: Red Flag 15-1 through Aussie eyes

The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) participated in Exercise Red Flag 15-1 at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada from 27 January to 13 February 2015 with turboprop aircraft. It was a first for the RAAF’s Lockheed Martin C-130J Hercules, two of these tactical airlifters took part, and the RAAF Lockheed AP-3C Orion maritime patrol and surveillance aircraft. Utilising the vast Nevada Test and Training Range, the Aussies flew in advanced airborne training environments to overcome simulated threats in the air and from the ground – working together with elements of the Royal Air Force and the United States armed forces.

That the 150 RAAF personnel deployed to Nellis had fun is clearly visible in the photographs we’ve got. We at Airheadsfly.com just think it is fantastic to able to share our selection of the excellent images taken by LAC Michael Green from the RAAF’s 28 Squadron of the Red Flag 15-1 ops.

Want more? ↑ See all our Red Flag features.

An US Air Force F-22A Raptor on short finals for landing at Nellis Air Force Base following a Red Flag 15-1 mission. (Image © LAC Michael Green / 28SQN AFID-CBR / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
An US Air Force F-22A Raptor on short finals for landing at Nellis Air Force Base following a Red Flag 15-1 mission. (Image © LAC Michael Green / 28SQN AFID-CBR / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
Royal Australian Air Force aircraft technicians prepare a No 37 Squadron C-130J for a Red Flag 15-1 mission (Image © LAC Michael Green / 28SQN AFID-CBR / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
Royal Australian Air Force aircraft technicians prepare a No 37 Squadron C-130J for a Red Flag 15-1 mission (Image © LAC Michael Green / 28SQN AFID-CBR / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
An USAF F-16C from the 64th Aggressor Squadron passing the Nellis flight line during Exercise Red Flag 2015-1 (Image © LAC Michael Green / 28SQN AFID-CBR / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
An USAF F-16C from the 64th Aggressor Squadron passing the Nellis flight line during Exercise Red Flag 2015-1 (Image © LAC Michael Green / 28SQN AFID-CBR / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
A Royal Air Force (RAF) Eurofighter Typhoon takes off at Nellis (Image © LAC Michael Green / 28SQN AFID-CBR / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
A Royal Air Force (RAF) Eurofighter Typhoon takes off at Nellis, with a USAF B-2 stealth bomber in the background (Image © LAC Michael Green / 28SQN AFID-CBR / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
Overhead Nellis a formation of four USAF F-16C Fighting Falcons (Image © LAC Michael Green / 28SQN AFID-CBR / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
Overhead Nellis a formation of four USAF F-16C Fighting Falcons (Image © LAC Michael Green / 28SQN AFID-CBR / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
An USAF F-15E Strike Eagle taxis past the RAAF No 10 Squadron AP-3C Orion taking part in Red Flag 15-1 (Image © LAC Michael Green / 28SQN AFID-CBR / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
An USAF F-15E Strike Eagle taxis past the RAAF No 10 Squadron AP-3C Orion taking part in Red Flag 15-1 (Image © LAC Michael Green / 28SQN AFID-CBR / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
A Royal Air Force (RAF) Sentinel aircraft takes off during Red Flag 15-1 (Image © LAC Michael Green / 28SQN AFID-CBR / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
A Royal Air Force (RAF) Sentinel aircraft takes off during Red Flag 15-1 (Image © LAC Michael Green / 28SQN AFID-CBR / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
A RAAF No 37 Squadron C-130J takes off on a mission as an F-16C Fighting Falcon from the United States Air Force's 64th Aggressor Squadron taxis along the flight line at Nellis (Image © LAC Michael Green / 28SQN AFID-CBR / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
A RAAF No 37 Squadron C-130J takes off on a mission as an F-16C Fighting Falcon from the United States Air Force’s 64th Aggressor Squadron taxis along the flight line at Nellis (Image © LAC Michael Green / 28SQN AFID-CBR / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
A RAAF C-130J Hercules from No 37 Squadron on its landing roll at Nellis (Image © LAC Michael Green / 28SQN AFID-CBR / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
A RAAF C-130J Hercules from No 37 Squadron on its landing roll at Nellis (Image © LAC Michael Green / 28SQN AFID-CBR / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
Against the skyline of Las Vegas an F-22A Raptor lands at Nellis (Image © LAC Michael Green / 28SQN AFID-CBR / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
Against the skyline of Las Vegas an F-22A Raptor lands at Nellis (Image © LAC Michael Green / 28SQN AFID-CBR / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
A RAF Typhoon on the flightline of Nellis during night ops (Image © LAC Michael Green / 28SQN AFID-CBR / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
A RAF Typhoon on the flightline of Nellis during night ops (Image © LAC Michael Green / 28SQN AFID-CBR / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
A Charlie Viper from the USAF 64th Aggressor Squadron airborne (Image © LAC Michael Green / 28SQN AFID-CBR / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
A Charlie Viper from the USAF 64th Aggressor Squadron airborne (Image © LAC Michael Green / 28SQN AFID-CBR / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
After-flight checks are performed on an RAAF C-130J Hercules. Seen behind it is a USAF HC-130J (Image © LAC Michael Green / 28SQN AFID-CBR / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
After-flight checks are performed on an RAAF C-130J Hercules. Seen behind it is a USAF HC-130J (Image © LAC Michael Green / 28SQN AFID-CBR / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)

Australian Props in Red Flag combat

For the first time ever the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) participates in the multi-national, US hosted large-scale combat exercise Red Flag with its Lockheed Martin C-130J Hercules and a Lockheed AP-3C Orion.

Having committed its fighter jets before the RAAF is keen on exposing its large propeller plane crews to a modern war scenario. “There are few training environments in the world that recreate the dangers of a modern battlespace like Exercise Red Flag,” RAAF’s Air Vice-Marshal Gavin Turnbull says in an Australian Defence Force’s press release.

Two C-130J Hercules from RAAF Base Richmond (NSW), an AP-3C Orion from RAAF Base Edinburgh (SA) and an Air Battle Management contingent from 41 Wing are participating in the Red Flag 2015-1, alongside combat aircraft from the United States and the United Kingdom. As many of our readers know, base of operations is Nellis Air Force Base in Las Vegas.

A F-15C Eagle (background) from the United States Air Force 65th Aggressor Squadron taxies past a Royal Australian Air Force AP-3C Orion from No. 10 Squadron (foreground) on the flightline at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada, USA (Image ©  Mr Eamon Hamilton  / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
A F-15C Eagle (background) from the United States Air Force 65th Aggressor Squadron taxies past a Royal Australian Air Force AP-3C Orion from No. 10 Squadron (foreground) on the flightline at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada, USA (Image © Eamon Hamilton / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)

“Day-time and night-time missions at Red Flag will require large numbers of aircraft to work together across a variety of roles to defeat threats. The dangers they face range from aggressor F-15 and F-16 fighters and simulated missile shots, through to electronic warfare and cyberspace attacks,” Vice-Marshal Turnbull adds.

While the Hercules’s will train in tactical airlift flying in a war zone, the AP-3C Orion crew will focus on overland surveillance of the combat area. The Nevada desert ranges are even somewhat similar to the current environment the RAAF is facing in real-life over the Middle East fighting ISIS in Iraq. Moreover, the RAAF crews deployed to Nellis bring along experience from Operation Slipper over Afghanistan.

Exercise Red Flag 15-1 continues until 13 February 2015, with 150 RAAF personnel participating.

© 2015 Airheadsfly.com editor Marcel Burger, based on source information provided by Australia, Department of Defence
Featured image (top): A RAAF C-130J Hercules at Nellis during Exercise Red Flag 15-1 (Image © Eamon Hamilton / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)

Related: ↑ Photo Essay: RAAF wages war against ISIS
AND ↑ Photo Special: RAAF Hornets during Red Flag 14-1

A Royal Australian Air Force C-130J Hercules from No. 37 Squadron taxies back to its parking position on the flightline at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada, following a mission during Exercise Red Flag 15-1 (Image ©  Mr Eamon Hamilton  / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
A Royal Australian Air Force C-130J Hercules from No. 37 Squadron taxies back to its parking position on the flightline at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada, following a mission during Exercise Red Flag 15-1 (Image © Eamon Hamilton / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
A Royal Australian Air Force C-130J Hercules from No. 37 Squadron conducts an 'initial and pitch' bank over Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada, following a mission during Exercise Red Flag 15-1 (Image ©  Mr Eamon Hamilton  / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
A Royal Australian Air Force C-130J Hercules from No. 37 Squadron conducts an ‘initial and pitch’ bank over Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada, following a mission during Exercise Red Flag 15-1 (Image © Eamon Hamilton / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)