Tag Archives: Raptor

US to base F-35s next to F-22s in Alaska

The US Air Force has selected Eielson Air Force Base in Alaska as a future home for the Lockheed Martin F-35A Lightning II. The base will house two squadrons equipped with the 5th generation fighter aircraft. Alaska, the only US state that borders Russia, already is home to F-22 Raptor jets at Elmendorf Air Force Base near Anchorage.

“The decision to base two F-35 squadrons at Eielson AFB will double our fifth-generation fighter aircraft presence in the Pacific theater,” said Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Welsh III. “It’s an exciting time for Pacific airpower.”

Construction

On-base construction to prepare Eielson airbase for the aircraft is expected to start in fiscal year 2017. The first F-35As are currently scheduled to arrive in 2020. The jets will join the F-16 aggressor squadron currently assigned to Eielson AFB.

Overseas

In a press release, the move is described as leading to the “first operational overseas F-35A Lightning IIs”. That would mean the Eielson-based aircraft are to be mission ready before the F-35s that are projected to be based at Lakenheath airbase in the UK, another overseas US airbase planned to operate F-35s in the future.

Meanwhile, the first Air National Guard base to host F-35s, will do so earlier than originally planned. Burlington Air Guard Station in Vermont is now scheduled to receive aircraft in fall 2019.

© 2016 Airheadsfly.com editor Elmer van Hest
Featured image (top): An F-35A inflight. (Image © Lockheed Martin)

Raptors join Lightnings at UK Air Tattoo at Fairford

US Air Force F-22 Raptors will join US F-35 Lightning II fighter jets during the Royal International Air Tattoo at RAF Fairford in July. They are part of the Air Combat Command (ACC) F-22 Raport demo team. According to a posting on the team’s Facebook on Tuesday 23 February, the team will be present in July at Fairford.

The F-22 will join the Lockheed Martin F-35’s announced earlier. The presence of both fifth generation fighter aircraft can without a doubt be regarded as a show of force of advanced Western military firepower. The F-22 has been on display at Fairford before, but never alongside its smaller and newer Lockheed Martin F-35 stablemate.

Dutch airshow

The F-35 should see it’s UK air show debut at Fairford this year, after a ditched attempt in 2014. However, the type’s first ever airshow appearance outside the US should take place at Leeuwarden airbase in the Netherlands in June. A Royal Netherlands Air Force F-35A will cross the Atlantic this spring for what the Dutch call ‘perception flights’, plus the appearance at Leeuwarden.

The F-22 was a rare sight in Europe for many years. That ended with the deployment of four jets to Germany in 2015 as a show of force to Russia.

© 2016 Airheadsfly.com editor Elmer van Hest
Featured image: An F-22 Raptor heads for the skies. (Image © Airman 1st Class Amanda Morris / USAF) 

Rafale, Raptor & Typhoon join forces in the US

In December, French Dassault Rafales and British Eurofighter Typhoons meet US Air Force Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptors during exercise Trilaterale Initiative (TEI) at Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. The three fighter jet types will operate alongside eachother for the first time during this exercise, which lasts until 18 December.

The French contingent arrived at Langley this week after an Atlantic crossing that orginated at Saint Dizier airbase in France. They brought six Rafales, two CF-135 Stratotankers and 150 personnel.

Royal Air Force

The RAF will bring Typhoons and 175 personnel, although the recent sending of UK Typhoons to battle so-called Islamic State may have an impact on this. The US Air Force provides 500 personnel and the state-of-the-art F-22, that saw its combat debut over Syria last year and its first deployment to Europe this year.

US Air Force F-15 Eagles and T-38 Talons will serve as adversaries during Trilaterale Initiative, while E-3 AWACS and KC-135 tanker aircraft provide support. First orientation flights for the exercise started on Friday 4 December.

© 2015 Airheadsfly.com editor Elmer van Hest
Featured image: A French Rafale pilot flies the French flag. (Image © Armée de l’Air)

A US Air Force F-22 Raptor. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
A US Air Force F-22 Raptor. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
A Royal Air Force (RAF) Eurofighter Typhoon takes off at Nellis (Image © LAC Michael Green / 28SQN AFID-CBR / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
A Royal Air Force (RAF) Eurofighter Typhoon. (Image © LAC Michael Green / 28SQN AFID-CBR / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)

Raptors get close during Estonia visit

Two out of four US Air Force F-22 Raptors currently deployed to Europe, went very much near Russia during a visit to Estonia on Friday 4 September. The aircraft arrived under escort by two A-10C Thunderbolts currently also deployed to the Baltics. More pics are here.

The two Lockheed Martin F-22s arrived at Ämari airbase in the morning and flew back to Spangdahlem in Germany later in the day. On Monday, two Raptors paid a similar quick visit to Łask airbase in Poland.

The advanced stealth fighters arrived in Germany on 28 August, flying directly from their homebase in Tyndall, Florida. They are expected to leave Europe again mid-September. In other US military movements, eight US Air National Guard F-16s are due to arrive on Friday in Poland for exercises.

© 2015 Airheadsfly.com editor Elmer van Hest
Featured image (top): Final approach for this F-22 Raptor.  (Image © Elmer van Hest)

The Raptors have landed, in Germany

UPDATE 11 September | The muscle to show Russia the United States means business has arrived. The meanest, leanest, winged US military asset has landed on Spangdahlem Airbase in Western Germany early in the evening of 28 August 2015. It marked the first deployment for the Raptor Pack as Rapid Reaction Force in Europe. Airheadsfly.com caught them on the spot.

UPDATE The Raptors headed home again on 11 September, arriving at RAF Mildenhall on their way back

Four Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptors flew from Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, across the Atlantic to give a clear signal that Washington is committed to the protection of its European NATO allies, although four birds don’t make a summer. Sixty airmen accompany the temporary deployment that was supported by a Boeing C-17A Globemaster III strategic airlifter with some necessary support equipment. The supporting tanker aircraft headed for Mildenhall airbase in the UK.

A remark at the Pentagon last week pointed to the Raptors being deployed to Europe. Their exact destination and arrival remained unknown – or better; untold – until just one day prior to their actual arrival at Spangdahlem.

(Image © Elmer van Hest)
The Raptors arrived in formation overhead the airfield. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
(Image © Elmer van Hest)
Not a lot, but at least some sunlight on this F-22. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

Enemy radar
The F-22 is the world’s most advanced fighter jet currently in operational service. Costing more than 150 million dollar a piece, the US Air Force received the last of 187 ordered Raptors in 2012. The aircraft has three internal weapon bays, making it hard to detect by enemy radar as long as it keeps the weapon bays shut. The main bay can accommodate six launchers for beyond-visual-range missiles and two side bays for short-range missiles.

A F-22 Raptor climbs after take-off from the flightline on 24 November 2014 at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam (Image © Airman 1st Class Amanda Morris / USAF)
RELATED POST: Raptor Pack as Rapid Reaction Force

Four launchers can be replace with racks for up to 1,000 lb (450kg) bombs or Joint Direct Attack Munition and Small-Diamater Bombs, a secondary attack option that the Raptors first fielded in a real war situation over Syria in 2014.

X-Mas Trees
However, for this Rapid Reaction kind of deployment to Germany, military radars – including Russian ones if within range – must have been able to track the F-22s all the way like they were flying X-Mas Trees. The landing birds of prey were carrying external fuel tanks that likely mess up their stealthy features completely – apart from looking aesthetically weird. But the extra wing tanks do make long-distance flights much more comfortable, when range and as few in-flight refuelling moments as possible are something to consider too.

© 2015 Airheadsfly.com editor Marcel Burger
Featured image (top): Final approach for this Tyndall F-22 Raptor at Spangdahlem Airbase in Germany.  (Image © Elmer van Hest)

(Image © Elmer van Hest)
The formation performed a right hand break to land at runway 05. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
(Image © Elmer van Hest)
The F-22s will probably remain in Europe for quite some time. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
(U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sergio A. Gamboa/Released)
The F-22’s departure from Tyndall was also something to behold, judging by this picture. (Image © US Air Force / Airman 1st Class Sergio A. Gamboa)
USAF_F22_Raptor_USAF_2
Preparing for a long flight. (Image © US Air Force / Airman 1st Class Sergio A. Gamboa)