Tag Archives: Poland

Poland keeps looking for new helicopters

Window shopping again, or more than that this time? After several failed attempts and growing friction with suppliers, Poland is having another go at beefing up its helicopter capabilities. The country is looking for eight anti-submarine choppers plus another eight helos for use by special forces, the ministry of Defense in Warsaw said on Monday 20 February.

Airbus Helicopters, Leonardo Helicopters and Lockheed Martin have been asked to come up with bids. The new choppers should replace ageing Mi-8 Hip and Mi-14 Haze helicopters that have been in Polish services for decades already, dating back to Eastern Bloc-times.

For Airbus Helicopters, this newest Polish tender will breng back the headaches that came with the selection of the H225 Caracal by Poland back in April 2015. After much hassle, that 3 billion USD deal was finally scrapped last year. Lockheed Martin (after taking over helicopters manufacturer Sikorsky first) then seemed to have the best cards for a Polish helicopter deal. However, that too appeared to be window shopping in the end.

© 2017 Airheadsfly.com editor Elmer van Hest
Featured image (top): A Polish Navy anti-submarine Mi-14 Haze helicopter. (Image © P. Kazylotnicze)

Polish analysis points to more F-16s

Poland is looking at possible solutions to replace ageing Sukhoi Su-22 Fitter and MiG-29 Fulcrum jets. According to an analysis made by the Polish MoD, one such solution could be the purchase of up to 96 second hand F-16s from the US. Wether this will trully materialize, remains to be seen. Poland currently operates 48 advanced F-16C/D jets.

It’s no surprise that the Polish are looking to replace their Soviet-era Sukhois and MiGs for something more suited to operate alongside the F-16. This could very well be F-16C/D aircraft previously used by the US Air Force, although these jets would require extensive updates to fit them into the existing Polish F-16 fleet. Also, while the US is to put aside many F-16s in the years to come, a substantial number of those will end up us remote controlled QF-16s.

Poland has been mentioned before as a country that may very well purchase the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lighting II at some point in the future. According to Warzaw, the jet is to expensive now, plus industrial offsets seem out of reach.

Perhaps Poland has started manoeuvring itself in a more favourable position for a future F-35 purchase by saying it is willing to expand its capabilities by buying a Lockheed Martin product, but not at any costs. In that light, the announcement on Friday 13 January that Lockheed Martin is close to a deal with the US government about reduced F-35 costs, may be welcome news for Poland.

Time will tell wether we indeed see more F-16 in Polish colours, or F-35s.

© 2017 Airheadsfly.com editor Elmer van Hest

New M-346 jets arrive in Poland & named ‘Bielik’

The first two M-346 Advanced Trainer Jets for Poland arrived at Deblin airbase late on Monday. The  type is named ‘Master’ by Italian aircraft producer Leonardo Aircraft, but in Poland now goes by the name of ‘Bielik’, meaning white tailed eagle. The two jets are the first of eight ordered.

The two Bieliks arrived at Deblin in the company of several TS-11 Iskras, the very type the new jets replace in their training role. The Polish M-346s have been modified with a braking chute, among other things.

Airheadsfly.com recently flew the Master aka Bielik over Italy, where Polish pilots have been receiving training since early 2016. A full report on that is here.

Poland is the fourth country to operate the M-346, following Italy, Singapore and Israel. Leonardo Aircraft so far delivered some 50 aircraft, which combined logged over 16,000 flight hours. Of those, close to half were chalked up by the 30 Israeli jets.

TS-11 Iskras welcome their successors. (Image © Paweł Bondaryk)
TS-11 Iskras welcome their successors. (Image © Paweł Bondaryk)
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After their arrival, the jets were sheltered for the night. (Image © Paweł Bondaryk)
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The Bielik’s shows it good looks head on. (Image © Paweł Bondaryk)

The Polish have a habit of naming military jets differently. The F-16 for example,  is not known as as Fighting Falcon but as Jastrzab (Hawk).

Bielik previously was also the name given the indigenous MS-10 jet trainer, which first flew in 2003 and was also meant to replace the TS-11 Iskra. Only one was ever produced however.

© 2016 Airheadsfly.com editor Elmer van Hest

(Image © Paweł Bondaryk)
Polish pride! (Image © Paweł Bondaryk)
(Image © Paweł Bondaryk)
The drag chute housing the tail. (Image © Paweł Bondaryk)
(Image © Paweł Bondaryk)
Ready for duty. (Image © Paweł Bondaryk)

 

First Polish M-346 jets close to delivery

Poland is getting close to receiving the first two M-346 Advanced Jet Trainers. Leonardo company pilots will fly the Polish M-346s to Deblin later in November. The new jets – eight of which are on order – replace ageing TS-11 Iskra trainer aircaft at Deblin airbase.

For the last couple of months, Polish Air Force pilot have been training on the new type at Lecce airbase in southern Italy. Airheadsfly.com recently flew a sortie in the M-346 from the same airbase and was very impressed.

The jets for Poland differs from similar aircraft for Italy, Singapore and Israel by having braking chutes installed. All eight jets are currently in production at the Leonardo Aircraft production line in Venegono, Italy.

© 2016 Airheadsfly.com

(Image © Dennis Spronk)
The third Polish M-346 in production in Italy. (Image © Dennis Spronk)

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Mastering the Master

“Radar lock on Cobra 1”, I hear my pilot call from the front seat. And yes,  I can see it on the head up display (HUD) and on the screen between my knees. But the thing is, we don’t actually carry radar or air-to-air missiles. Seconds later and to my amazement, I see Cobra 1 in a thermal targeting image from a Litening pod on the left screen. The image reflects my actual view of Cobra 1 in our 1 o’clock position. But again, the thing is, we don’t actually carry a Litening pod. Welcome to the M-346 Master Advanced Jet Trainer and it’s world of simulation.

Click on the pictures for a larger image

Just 30 minutes before, Cobra 1 and Cobra 2 are both lined up at runway 14 at Lecce Galatina airbase in southern Italy. The military airfield houses the Italian Air Force’s 61st Wing and all seven M-346 Master Advanced Jet Trainers now in use. Two of those are now scheduled for a familiarization sortie in the area, with me in the backseat of Cobra 2. Flying Cobra 1 is the commander of 212 Gruppo, the squadron that since 2014 is the sole operator of the M-346 in the Italian Air Force.

(Image © Elmer van Hest)
Time for a selfie while holding short for take off. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

The flight follows after a visit to Leonardo Aircraft’s Venegono facility in northern Italy, where the remaining eleven Italian jets are still in production, next to a batch of eight aircraft for Poland. Leonardo puts the M-346 – called T-346A by the air force – on the market not merely as a Phase 4 Lead-in Fighter Trainer (LIFT) platform, but as an integrated training solution for military jet pilots, and one that makes good use of the virtues of simulation. In the costly world of 4th and 5th generation fighter jets, that’s not a bad place to start from.

Take off

Back in Lecce, we start our take off roll in formation and become airborne after only 15 seconds. Since I studied the Master’s cockpit the day before in Venegono, I already feel somewhat familair in these surroundings, but what catches me by surprise once in the air, is the nearly unlimited visibility from the back seat. I can observe nearly all of the world around me, but also what my pilot – whose tactical callsign is ‘Pants’  – is up to in the front seat. Pants is an instructor pilot (IP) and it’s his job to ready student pilots for the next step in their military flying career, which is flying 4th and 5th generation fighter aircraft such as the Typhoon, plus the F-35 Lightning II in the near future. But first, they’ll have to master the Master.

(Image © Elmer van Hest)
Rotation is achieved just 15 seconds or so after brake release. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
(Image © Elmer van Hest)
A topside view over Italian farmland. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
(Image © Elmer van Hest)
The sea turns turquoise while we execute a left hand turn. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

Data stream

In doing so, the 8 g capable M-346 should also be able to present student pilots with the same, endless data stream that fighter pilots are subjected to in combat situations. And after doing some pre-briefed photo set ups below and above the clouds first, the jet in fact proves it is capable of doing exactly that. Pants in quick succession shows me the various air-to-ground and air-to-air modes. If needed and by using the M-346’s embedded tactical simulation plus datalink capablities, an IP on the ground at Lecce could present us with an immediate tactical threat of any kind, and leave us to deal with it. It puts the right amount of pressure on any aspiring fighter pilot. But, thanks to Leonardo’s smart and unique Live Virtual Constructive (LVC), none of it is actually real.

(Image © Elmer van Hest)
Cobra 1 shows its belly to the camera. The small profile of the M-346 makes it quite hard to visually spot from distances. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
(Image © Elmer van Hest)
Barrell rolling in formation. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
(Image © Elmer van Hest)
And more aerobatics as seen from the backseat. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

Computer generated

The same goes for the thoroughly convincing thermal image I’m seeing of Cobra 1. That image is actually a computer generated picture, relayed to us via a ground station at Lecce. But to us in the cockpit of Cobra 2, it is like we are actually carrying a Litening pod beneath our aircraft.  I have to remind myself that in reality, we don’t. Our jet is in full trainer configuration, completely devoid of any external stores.

(Image © Elmer van Hest)
A climbing turn on the wing of Cobra 1. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
(Image © Elmer van Hest)
Cobra 1 in the distance… (Image © Elmer van Hest)
(Image © Elmer van Hest)
… and up close in a computer generated infrared image. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

Mean version

If it were up to Leonardo Aircraft back in Venegono, that may very well change. The company is currently developing the M-346FT (for Fighter Trainer), a weaponized variant of the M-346. ‘One system, one switch, two missions’, the head of Leonardo’s international sales division tirelessly repeats when talking about this ‘meaner’ M-346, that effortlessly turns from a trainer aircraft into a full fighter aircraft. Electronic warfare capabilities, chaff and flares, recce and targeting pods; all possibly turn from simulated to very real on the M-346FT.

The FT version was sparked by interest from Poland when ordering an initial batch of eight trainer versions. Deliveries of the first of these are set for November 2016. Leonardo is working on update kits that transform M-346 trainers into M-346FT warplanes.

Alternative

The M-346FT also is a noteworthy alternative to buying new expensive fighter jets for countries such as Argentina. That explains the visit to Lecce by Argentine Air Force pilots just a few days before my M-346 flight. Lecce is a melting pot of nationalities by any standards. The airbase houses student and instructor pilots not only from Italy, but also from Poland, Greece, Kuwait, Austria and Singapore among others.

(Image © Elmer van Hest)
Up, up, up! Despite not being equipped with afterburning engines, the M-346 has plenty of power. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
(Image © Elmer van Hest)
(Image © Elmer van Hest)

Dutch training

The Royal Netherlands Air Force (RNLAF) is also represented at Lecce. An instructor pilot has been flying the M-346 for about a year know, although the main objective of the Dutch delegation is to find out if fighter pilot training in Italy could replace current training in the US. Whereas Dutch student pilots were originally to fly the M-346 also, the RNLAF instead opted for the cheaper and less capable MB-339CD. The Dutch however are enthusiastic about the Italian way of training, and about the M-346 in particular.

Barrel rolls

Meanwhile, at 10,000 feet over the Mediterranean Sea, we do some tight turns, barrel rolls and more aerobatics in formation. By now, we have burned close to 1400 kilograms of fuel, so ‘bingo fuel’ is called and it’s time to head back to Lecce. Before we land, I take pictures of Cobra 1 overflying the airbase and the Ground Based Training System (GBTS) that reflects the increasing amount of simulator training that is being done at Lecce. Currently, 50 percent of flight training takes place in the simulator on the ground, but this percentage could grow to as much as 80 percent in the future, further driving down costs.

While Cobra 1 settles down on runway 14, Pants pushes forward the throttles for one more go around and a final circuit followed by a 130 kts landing. As we taxi back to the hangarettes and I switch my ejection seat to safe, I realize that I am truly impressed by the aircraft I have just spend 1 hour and ten minutes in. Mastering the Master appears quite a handful with all the information management tasks it is able to provide, but it’s exactly that which prepares students for what awaits them. It turns them from pilots into fighter pilots.

© 2016 Airheadsfly.com editor Elmer van Hest
Featured image (top): Breaking left! (Image © Elmer van Hest)

(Image © Elmer van Hest)
Over the coastal town of Santa Maria di Leuca…. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
(Image © Elmer van Hest)
… and over Lecce airbase, with the Ground Based Training System (GBTS) visible just to the right of the aircraft’s nose, plus the hangarettes in the lower right hand corner. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
(Image © Elmer van Hest)
Cobra 1 turning final for landing. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
(Image © Elmer van Hest)
Touchdown! (Image © Elmer van Hest)
(Image © Elmer van Hest)
Our turn on finals. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Two thumbs up for the M-346 Master Advanced Jet Trainer. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Two thumbs up for the M-346 Master Advanced Jet Trainer. (Image © Elmer van Hest)