Tag Archives: MiG-29

PHOTO REPORT: MiG-29K/KUB carrier tests

(Image © Mikoyan Gurevich)
(Image © Mikoyan Gurevich)

Mikoyan-Gurevich has started aircraft carrier flight testing of its series production version of the MiG-29K/KUB fighter. The tests are carried out on board the aircraft future home: the Russian Navy Admiral Kuznetsov. We got the photos from the tests, which were perfomed in September.

The Admiral Kuznetsov is the only aircraft carrier in the Russian Navy, serving with the Northern Fleet out of Murmansk. Mikoyan-Gurevich is contracted for the delivery of 20 MiG-29K single-seat and four MiG-29KUB two-seat fighter jets. Currently only Sukhoi Su-33s operate from the aircraft carrier.

The big difference between a normal MiG-29 and the K/KUB version is its foldable wings and better ground-/sea-attack capabilities. MiG put a new Zhuk-ME radar into the machine. Due to the nature of stronger forces on the airframe during carrier operations the aircraft manufacturer also strengthened the airframe and put on a strong tail-hook for the cable-arrested landings on board the aircraft carrier.

Like the American navy the MiG-29K/KUB is capable to execute so-called buddy-refueling, meaning it can provide other MiG-29s in the air of extra fuel. An aircraft carrier is to small for a proper tanker aircraft and by using refueling pods underneath the wing the carrier air unit is capable to operate on longer distance or stay aloft longer without the need of Air Force assets jumping in.

Russia is not the only country using the MiG-29K/KUB. India bought the aircraft to fly from its INS Vikramaditya, the aircraft carrier that Russia will hand over to the Indian Navy in mid-November.

Source: Mikoyan-Gurevich / Indian Navy

(Image © Mikoyan Gurevich)
(Image © Mikoyan Gurevich)
(Image © Mikoyan Gurevich)
(Image © Mikoyan Gurevich)
(Image © Mikoyan Gurevich)
(Image © Mikoyan Gurevich)
(Image © Mikoyan Gurevich)
(Image © Mikoyan Gurevich)

Russia increases its military in Armenia

The Mi-28 attack helicopter (Image © Russian Helicopters)
The Mi-28 attack helicopter (Image © Russian Helicopters)

Russia will increase its air forces in Armenia by adding a helicopter squadron to the fighter unit already operating from Erebuni Air Base/Gyumri near Yerevan, reports Russian press agency RAI Novosti.

Currently Erebuni is home to 16 Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-29 Fulcrum fighters, part of a by Russia brokered deal to provide defences for the ex-Soviet republics part of the Commonwealth of Independent States. Erebuni is located close to the border with Turkey and therefore a key asset of the Russian military. Officially the airport also accommodates civilian passenger and cargo flights, but those are very limited to charters and services on demand.

The type of helicopter that will be based at Erebuni is yet unclear, but it will likely be either Mi-17s, Mi-24V/Ps or even the Mi-28N Night Hunter. The Armenian Air Force main air assets are 16 Mi-24s and 18 Mi-8s, plus a dozen Su-25 ground attack aircraft.

Source: RAI Novosti with additional reporting by AIRheads’ Marcel Burger

Related posts

First modernised Polish MiG-29 back on duty

A Polish Air Force MiG-29A Fulcrum taking off from Berlin-Schönefeld during an airshow in 2008. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
A Polish Air Force MiG-29A Fulcrum taking off from Berlin-Schönefeld during an airshow in 2008. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

The first of 16 modernised Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-29 Fulcrum fighter aircraft is back on duty with the Polish Air Force. The single-seater with number 89 landed at Minsk Mazowiecki Airbase at the end of July. A second modernised Fulcrum will soon follow, according to a press release by the Polish Air Force (Siły Powietrzne).

Wojskowe Zaklady Lotnicze No. 2 and Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) together upgrade the Fulcrums, 13 single-seaters (MiG-29A) and 3 two-seaters (MiG-29UB). The modernisation mainly concerns the pilot’s office, since the aircraft themselves have already been refurbished to last another 4,000 flight hours each. The biggest eye-catcher is a new multi-function display, clearly visible on the image published at the Polish Air Force website.

Source: Siły Powietrzne

Check out the Polish Air Force Orbat at Scramble.nl

Time for Twentynine

It is July 29th today – and let’s just call this day International MiG-29 Day from now on. Yeah! Inspired by our recent digging up of ol’ F-4 Phantom shots, we started looking for some Fulcrums as well since we feel Phantoms and Fulcrums are sort of ‘in the same category’: the category of King of Cool, that is. Here are some hot shots.

We like Poland and we like MiG-29s. Good combo right there.

Was at 5 years ago already? That scorching hot airshow at Berlin-Schönefeld. This Polish MiG29 was a show stealer.
Take off during a scorching hot airshow at Berlin-Schönefeld back in 2008. This Polish MiG-29 stole the show. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
We had to dust off our trusty scanner to get this shot somewhat presentable for you. It's another Polish MiG29, in the colours of its former owner, the Czech Republic. Photo taken at Dijon, France, 1997. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
We had to dust off our trusty scanner to get this shot somewhat presentable for you. It’s another Polish MiG-29, in the colours of its former owner, the Czech Republic. Photo taken at Dijon, France, 1997. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

Hungary is great too! Both its capital Budapest and its MiG-29s. Good combo again!

Definitely not the time for a screwed up landing. Photo taken during the 2007 Kecskemét airshow. Kecskemét; we keep screwing up that name, so we checked the spelling especially for you, dear reader.
Definitely not the time to screw up a landing. Photo taken during the 2007 Kecskemét airshow. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

For more than a decade, Germany used a bunch of Fulcrums that were leftovers from the Nationale Volksarmee (NVA), otherwise known as the East German army. The German MiG-29s were eventually sold to Poland, although a few are preserved in Germany.

Want to pimp your ride? Call the Germans! They know about proper paintjobs on airplanes. This Fulcrum was seen at Florennes, Belgium in 2001. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Want to pimp your ride? Call the Germans! They know about proper paintjobs on airplanes. This Fulcrum was seen at Florennes, Belgium in 2001. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

These guys are a bit rare, but have shown up in Dutch viewfinders before … Serbia operates a few Fulcrums and did so during the 2012 Batajnica airshow near Belgrade – a city we loved spending some time in while enjoying some Jelen beer.

What's not to like about those lines?
What’s not to like? (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Setting it down nicely on one of Batajnica's two runways.
Putting it down nicely on one of Batajnica’s two runways. The 2012 airshow saw high temperatures, a huge crowd and the treat of nine Fulcrums, of which four were from the host nation. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

Next up is a Slovakian MiG-29. We like the Slovaks – simply because they are still flying these things.

Back in the days, when Fulcrums were regulars at European airshows. This one shows its stuff at Fairford 1995.
Back in the days, when Fulcrums were regulars at European airshows. This one shows its stuff at Fairford 1995.

Bulgaria sent a MiG-29UB to the 2011 Izmir Airshow, and AIRheads↑FLY was there to capture it and enjoy some of that fine Turkish food and weather.

Are we taking it with us all the way to parking? Yep, we are.
“Are we dragging that thing with us all the way to the parking lot? Yep, we are.” (Image © Elmer van Hest)

MiG-29s come in flocks too! One such flock is called Team Strizhi in Russian, or Team Swallows for non-Russian speakers.

Team Stryyi were stars of the 2005 airshow in Brno. Key for succesfull photography at this airshow was to stay outside the airfield.
Team Stryyi was the star of the 2005 airshow at Brno. Key for succesfull photography at this airshow was to stay outside the airfield. A spot to the south of the runway provided excellent views. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

Always finish with a rarity is our motto. We anticipate this is rare enough for a grande finale:

A Cuban MiG29UB in the Museo del Aire in Havana. Yeah, that's rare, because it is on of only two Cuban MiG29UB's that ever excisted. This picture was taken in december 2006 and the museum has since completely vanished. Not a trace left. It made this MiG29 even rarer.
A Cuban MiG-29UB in the Museo del Aire in Havana. Yeah, that’s rare, because it is one of only two Cuban MiG-29UBs that ever existed. This pic was taken in december 2006 and the museum has since completely vanished. Not a trace left. Our guess is this MiG now resides at San Antonio de los Banos airbase near Havana, away from public eyes. It makes this Fulcrum even more rare. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

© 2013 AIRheads editor Elmer van Hest