Tag Archives: Kleine Brogel

Ssshhh … there was a Red Flag 14-02

A USAF F-15E Strike Eagle pilot from the 336th Fighter Squadron from Seymour Johnson AFB goes through post-flight checks during Red Flag 14-2 3 March 2014 (Image © Airman 1st Class Thomas Spangler / USAF)
A USAF F-15E Strike Eagle pilot from the 336th Fighter Squadron from Seymour Johnson AFB goes through post-flight checks during Red Flag 14-2 3 March 2014 (Image © Airman 1st Class Thomas Spangler / USAF)

With the international community focusing on both the Russian-Ukrainian stand-off and the missing of Malaysian Airlines flight MH370, one almost forgets loads of other things happen in the world of aviation. Take the famous Red Flag exercises in the Nevada dessert. At AIRheads↑Fly we published a much viewed feature on edition 14-01, but the second Red Flag of the year went by largely unnoticed. Until now 🙂

Even the media units of the Belgian and Danish ministries of Defence hardly paid any attention to their men and women being deployed to literately the Vegas of aerial combat. Maybe they took the nickname of the host city a bit to seriously: What happens there, stays there. Only when Belgian Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Aviator Gerard Van Caelenberge visited the operations at Nellis AFB, a little bit of news coverage followed but without any Belgian F-16s to show. From the Danish side, it was as quiet as it normally is from the Saudis who were also there this time.

Good that the US Air Force press service and their photographers did notice they had Europeans flying combat sorties in American designed aircraft over the Nevada ranges. We selected the highlights – including footage released by the Belgian Defence of the their C-JCS visit. The Belgian Air Component F-16s and stunningly painted C-130H were caught by Dave Budd from from fellow online aviation magazine Photorecon.net. Steve Lewis followed with an astonishing photo series as well!

© 2014 AIRheads’ editor Marcel Burger

Royal Danish Air Force Lance Cpl. Robert Nielsen, crew chief of RDAF's Esk 730 marshals in a Skrydstrup F-16 Fighting Falcon upon arrival on Nellis AFB, 26 February 2014 (Image © Senior Airman Matthew Lancaster / USAF)
Royal Danish Air Force Lance Cpl. Robert Nielsen, crew chief of RDAF’s Esk 730 marshals in a Skrydstrup F-16 Fighting Falcon upon arrival on Nellis AFB, 26 February 2014 (Image © Senior Airman Matthew Lancaster / USAF)
RDAF Esk 727 and Esk 730 F-16s on the flightline of Nellis AFB on 26 February 2014 ahead of Red Flag 14-2 (Image © Senior Airman Matthew Lancaster / USAF)
RDAF Esk 727 and Esk 730 F-16s on the flight line of Nellis AFB on 26 February 2014 ahead of Red Flag 14-2
(Image © Senior Airman Matthew Lancaster / USAF)
A NATO E-3A Sentry AWACS takes off at Nellis AFB during Red Flag 14-2 (Image © Airman 1st Class Thomas Spangler / USAF)
A NATO E-3A Sentry AWACS takes off at Nellis AFB during Red Flag 14-2
(Image © Airman 1st Class Thomas Spangler / USAF)
A B-52 from the 96th Bomb Squadron takes off during Red Flag 14-2 on 4 March 2014  at Nellis AFB (Image © Airman 1st Class Thomas Spangler / USAF)
A B-52 from the 96th Bomb Squadron takes off during Red Flag 14-2 on 4 March 2014 at Nellis AFB
(Image © Airman 1st Class Thomas Spangler / USAF)

Participants of Red Flag 14-02 (Source: USAF)
Combat & Strike

  • USAF F-15C Eagles from the 123rd Fighter Squadron, Portland ANG Base, Oregon
  • USAF F-15C Eagles from the 40th Flight Test Squadron, Eglin AFB, Florida
  • Royal Saudi Air Force (RSAF) F-15S Strike Eagles, from either Dhahran or/and Khamis Mushayt (King Khalid Air Base) Airbases
  • USAF F-15E Strike Eagles from the 336th Fighter Squadron, Seymour Johnson AFB, North Carolina
  • USAF F-16CM Fighting Falcons from the 4th Fighter Squadron, Hill AFB, Utah
  • USAF F-16CJ Fighting Falcons (SEAD variant), 77th Fighter Squadron, Shaw AFB, South Carolina
  • Belgian Air Component F-16AM Fighting Falcons, 2 Tactical Wing, Florennes Airbase, Belgium
  • Belgian Air Component F-16AM Fighting Falcons, 10 Tactical Wing, Kleine Brogel Airbase, Belgium
  • Royal Danish Air Force F-16AM Fighting Falcons, Esk 727/Esk 730, Skrydstrup Airbase, Denmark
  • USAF B-52H Stratofortresses from the 96th Bomb Squadron, Barksdale AFB, Louisiana

Electronic Warfare & Control

  • USAF E-3C Sentry, 965th Airborne Air Control Squadron, Tinker AFB, Oklahoma
  • USN EA-18G Growlers, Electronic Attack Squadron 141 (CAW 5), Naval Air Facility Atsugi, Japan
  • NATO E-3A Sentries, NATO AWACS Unit, Geilenkirchen Airbase, Germany

(Combat) Search-and-Rescue

  • HH-60 Pave Hawks, 66th Rescue Squadron, Nellis AFB, Nevada
  • HC-130J Combat King IIs, 79th Rescue Squadron, Davis-Monthan AFB, Arizona

Opposing Forces (OPFOR)

  • USAF F-16C Fighting Falcons, 64th Agressor Squadron, Nellis AFB, Nevada
  • USAF F-16C Fighting Falcons, 65th Agressor Squadron, Nellis AFB, Nevada
  • USAF F-15C Eagle, 65th Agressor Squadron, Nellis AFB, Nevada

Tactical airlift

  • Belgian Air Component C-130H Hercules, 15 Wing Air Transport, Brussels/Melsbroek Airbase, Belgium
Belgian C-JCS Gen. Aviator Gerard Van Caelenberge arriving on 10 March 2014 on the Belgian Air Component (BAC) Dassault Falcon 900B. Notice the BAC Airbus A330-300 in the background. (Image © Defensie / Belgian Ministry of Defence)
Belgian C-JCS Gen. Aviator Gerard Van Caelenberge arriving on 10 March 2014 on the Belgian Air Component (BAC) Dassault Falcon 900B. Notice the BAC Airbus A330-300 in the background.
(Image © Defensie / Belgian Ministry of Defence)
Belgian C-JCS Gen. Aviator Gerard Van Caelenberge went for a ride in the backseat of this USAF 65th Agressor Squadron F-15C Eagle. Taken on 10 or 11 March 2014. (Image © Defensie / Belgian Ministry of Defence)
Belgian C-JCS Gen. Aviator Gerard Van Caelenberge went for a ride in the backseat of this USAF 65th Agressor Squadron F-15D Eagle. Taken on 10 or 11 March 2014.
(Image © Defensie / Belgian Ministry of Defence)

Forty Viper Years

USAF_F16tbirdssolo
No article about forty years of F-16 Fighting Falcon is complete without one of these guys.
(Image © Elmer van Hest)

It’s extraordinary to think that back in the early seventies, an average computer was the size of an average refrigerator. But that probably wasn’t what was going on in the mind of test pilot Phil Oestricher when he – albeit unintended – took the YF-16 to the air for the first time forty years ago, on 20 January 1974. It was the soon to be first large scale mass produced fighter jet flying with microchips and fly-by-wire, and boy did it almost end in disaster. Eventually of course, it came out a winner – and the flying proof of a digital, computerized future.

Oestricher and the people at General Dynamics must have watched in horror as the prototype YF-16, stuffed with micro computer technology that was basically unheard of in those days, accidentally got airborne during a fast taxi test at Edwards Air Force Base. What followed was an almost comical struggle between a pilot – wanting not to fly – and his aircraft wanting to fly. In the end, Oestricher (read his story here) decided to take the aircraft up. He landed back at Edwards immediately after, safely ending what later became known as ‘flight zero’. Two weeks later, he took the YF-16 up for the official ‘first’ flight.

Phenomenal
That wobbly ‘flight zero’ in no way illustrates the phenomenal success the General Dynamics F-16 Fighter Falcon – or Electric Jet or Viper – became soon afterwards. As small as the aircraft is – 14.8 meters long and 9.8 meters wide – as big was and still is its commercial success. The USAF was of course the first user, but in ‘The Sale Of The Century’ the F-16 was also sold by the hundreds to Belgium, the Netherlands, Norway and Denmark. The deal was signed following the 1975 Paris Le Bourget airshow, where pilot Neil Anderson demonstrated the previously unseen manoeuverability of the YF-16.

A Belgian F-16BM, seen here pulling Gs in its natural element; the blue yonder. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The four European Participating Air Forces (EPAF) purchased no less then 524 F-16s altogether. First up: Belgium. A F-16BM is seen here pulling Gs in its natural element; the blue yonder. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Champions of the special paint, that's what the Belgians are. Number 31 'smaldeel' at Kleine Brogel airbase keeps up the tradition of painting aircraft in tiger colours. (Image © Robert van Zon)
Champions of the special paint, that’s what the Belgians are. Number 31 Smaldeel at Kleine Brogel Airbase keeps up the tradition of painting aircraft in tiger colours. (Image © Robert van Zon)
Denmark_F16AMshelter
Since the eighties, hardened aircraft shelters are as much of a natural habitat for F-16s as the sky is. It’s where a lot of European Vipers spend much of their time, like this Danish F-16AM at Skrydstrup airbase.
(Image © Elmer van Hest)
This Bravo is called Orange Jumper, because of its large orange badge. It belongs to the test unit of the KLu. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Another F-16 takes shelter. This time, it’s an F-16BM, used by the Royal Netherlands Air Force for test purposes. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
But the Dutch also have had their share of special paints. Here, two Vipers with special tails are seen at Volkel airbase. (Image © Robert van Zon)
The Dutch also have had their share of special paints. Here, two Vipers with unique tails at Volkel Airbase. (Image © Robert van Zon)
Whereas most F-16 users choose the standard 3-tone grey livery, the Norwegians opted for overall light grey... and they didn't do special paints very often. (Image © Robert van Zon)
Whereas most F-16 users choose the standard 3-tone grey livery, the Norwegians opted for overall light grey… and they didn’t do special paints very often. (Image © Robert van Zon)

Versions
Nowadays, 24 countries use the various further developed versions of the original YF-16. The two prototypes were followed by several pre-production aircraft, after which serial production started on three lines, which eventually became five lines in as many countries. The A/B versions were followed by the C/D versions. More recently E/F and I versions entered service. More obscure Fighting Falcons are the delta winged F-16XL and the General Electric J-79 equipped F-16/79. The US Navy’s (T)F-16N aggressor aircraft were also relatively short-lived.

Practice what you preach. It's no wonder the USAF equipped the Thunderbirds with F-16s in an early stage. Who needs marketeers? (Image © Robert van Zon)
Practice what you preach. It’s no wonder the USAF equipped the Thunderbirds with F-16s in an early stage. Who needs marketeers? (Image © Robert van Zon)
The F-16 has been used over hotspots for decades, one of those hotspots being the Korean peninsula. This USAF F-16C is based at Osan. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The F-16 has been used over hotspots for decades, one of those hotspots being the Korean peninsula. This USAF F-16C is part of the 51st Fighter Wing, based at Osan. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The US Air National Guard is by no means a stranger to the F-16.  (Image © Ralph Blok)
The US Air National Guard is by no means a stranger to the F-16. (Image © Ralph Blok)
US Navy F-16Ns weren't around for very long, although this specimen (serial 163576) remains preserved at NAS Fallon, NV. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
US Navy F-16Ns weren’t around for very long, although this specimen (serial 163576) remains preserved at NAS Fallon, Nevada (Image © Elmer van Hest)

Orders
More than 4,540 F-16s have been produced, mostly at the Lockheed Martin production line at Fort Worth. Apart from the four first European customers, Israel, Venezuela and Pakistan were among the early adopters as well, ordering aircraft in the early eighties. More recent customers include Chile, Morocco and Iraq. Lockheed Martin took over General Dynamics in 1993 and now has 48 aircraft remaining on order, according to a statement released on Thursday. Among the remaining orders are aircraft for Oman and Iraq. When asked, the company wouldn’t comment on any special activities relating to the Vipers’ 40th birthday.

Turning more oriental now with this Samsung built, Republic of Korea Air Force (RoKAF) F-16D, seen on approach to Seosan airbase. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Turning more oriental now with this Samsung built, Republic of Korea Air Force (RoKAF) F-16D, seen on approach to Seosan airbase. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Pakistan_F16Atakeoff
Pakistan was an early adopter and ordered the F-16 as early as 1981. The aircraft above was part of that order. More recently, Pakistan received brand spankin’ new F-16C/D fighters. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Pakistan_F16Atopside
Topside! (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Cruzex 2013 marks the first time forces from Venezuela and the US are training together, after years of political and ideological arguments between the two countries. The death of former Venezuela president Hugo Chávez in March this year, clearly changed the mood. (Image © Ralph Blok)
Cruzex 2013 offered a good opportunity to see some of those rare F-16s from Venezuela. (Image © Ralph Blok)
Strike a pose! Portugal operates a few dozen F-16s, of which 15108 was delivered in the mid-nineties. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Strike a pose! Portugal operates a few dozen F-16s, of which 15108 was delivered in the mid-nineties. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Blue skies and not a storm in sight. Or is there? The Lockheed Martin F-16I is actually called 'Sufa' (Storm) in Israeli service. A perfect storm which makes for a nice picture. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Blue skies and not a storm in sight. Or is there? The Lockheed Martin F-16I is actually called ‘Sufa’ (Storm) in Israeli service. A perfect storm which makes for a nice picture. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Turkey_F-16soloturk
Another topside, and this time it is the shiny upper surface of Solotürk, the demo aircraft of the Turkish Air Force. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Greece ordered several batches of Fighting Falcons over the years, totaling 170 aircraft. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Greece ordered several batches of Fighting Falcons over the years, totaling 170 aircraft.
(Image © Elmer van Hest)
Poland operates some of the most advanced F-16s in Europe. (Image © Robert van Zon)
Poland operates some of the most advanced F-16s in Europe. (Image © Robert van Zon)

Second hand
Many Vipers have changed ownership already, with the US selling or leasing lots of of their surplus aircraft to other countries. Early model F-16A and B aircraft soon found their way to Israel, and later on similar aircraft were also delivered to Jordan. A small number of US F-16Cs went to Indonesia.

Belgium and the Netherlands are also in the business of selling Vipers abroad, customers being Jordan and Chile. Some F-16s are third hand already, as Portugal sold second hand Vipers to Romania last year.

Italy used former US Vipers as a stop gap until enough Eurofighter EF2000 were delivered. These were of the F-16ADF kind, a specialized version for air defence. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Italy used former US Vipers as a stop gap until enough Eurofighter EF2000s were delivered. The AMI flew the F-16ADF, a specialized version for air defence. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Jordan flies former US Vipers as well, plus aircaft bought from the surplus inventories of Belgium and the Netherlands. This a former Belgian aircraft, now in Jordan service. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Jordan flies former US Vipers as well, plus aircraft bought from surplus inventories of Belgium and the Netherlands. This a former Belgian aircraft, now in Jordanian service. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Former Dutch F-16s also found their way to Chile although this aircraft is seen here on exercise in Brazil. (Image © Ralph Blok)
Former Dutch F-16s also found their way to Chile, although this Chilean aircraft is seen here on exercise in Brazil. (Image © Ralph Blok)

In the pocket
The whine of either the Pratt and Whitney PW220 or General Electric F110 that equips the F-16 will be heard for many years to come, as Vipers are started up at airfields around the world to fill and patrol the skies. The computerized F-16 paved the way for many military and commercial airplanes, and also for many technological applications that are now standard in every household, and possibly even in the pocket of your jeans – if that’s where you keep your cellphone.

It’s extraordinary to think what an impact this little agile fighter has had. It sure didn’t look that way on 20 January 1974. Cheers!

© 2014 AIRheads’ editor Elmer van Hest
Featured image: No article about forty years of F-16 Fighting Falcon is complete without one of these guys.(Image © Elmer van Hest)

If there ever was a universal signal, it's thumbs up! This Turkish F-16 pilot shows his satisfaction after a successful mission. (Image
Thumbs up to the F-16! (Image © Elmer van Hest)

Draken-deal brings new hopes to Czech trainer

An Aero L-159A ALCA advanced trainer and light attack aircraft of the Czech Air Force (Vzdušné síly armády České republiky) landing at Kleine Brogel AB, Belgium, after a NATO training mission in 2005. The aircraft with serial 6052 is from 212.lt based at Cáslav.  (Image © Marcel Burger)
An Aero L-159A ALCA advanced trainer and light attack aircraft of the Czech Air Force (Vzdušné síly armády České republiky) landing at Kleine Brogel AB, Belgium, after a NATO training mission in 2005. The aircraft with serial 6052 is from 212.lt based at Cáslav. (Image © Marcel Burger)

The announced sale negotiations of 28 ex-Czech Air Force L-159 ALCA advanced trainer aircraft to military subcontractor Draken International in the USA has brought new hopes to Czech aircraft manufacturer Aero Vodochody. With the American continent opening up to its aircraft, the company now starts developing a new and bigger trainer & light attack aircraft.

Czech media report that the new plane is designated L-169 and that it will be more Czech than the L-159, meaning less foreign components. According to an Aero spokesman the company intends to give the L-169 a bigger range than its predecessor, giving it a main fuel tank capable of 1,300 liters and innerwing storage for another 600 liters. A lot of times extended ranges are met by attaching underwing fuel pods, but they cause more drag and thus increasing the fuel consumption and decreasing the performance somewhat. The L-159 was able to cross 1,570 kilometres (845 nautical miles) on internal fuel and 2,530 km (1,365 nautical miles) with external fuel tanks.

Mothballed
The L-169 will primarily be designed as an advanced trainer, not like the L-159 that was meant to give the Czech Republic an affordable light combat capacity after the break-up of the Warsaw Pact and the limitation of military funds. With the combat role since 2005 taken over by the 14 much more capable Saab JAS 39C/D Gripen fighters, the L-159 has become less popular with its owner. Only 24 of 72 delivered planes are still in use, with the remainder mothballed.

Ground crew gathering around a Czech Air Force L-159A ALCA at Kleine Brogel AB, Belgium, during a NATO training exercise in 2005. (Image © Marcel Burger)
Ground crew gathering around a Czech Air Force L-159A ALCA at Kleine Brogel AB, Belgium, during a NATO training exercise in 2005. (Image © Marcel Burger)

28 L-159As
For many of the decommissioned aircraft there seems to be a new life ahead across the Atlantic Ocean. Aero is talking to Florida based Draken International Inc to sell the subcontractor for the US military 28 L-159As from the Czech Air Force storage. “The successful conclusion of the sale and introduction of the aircraft in the USA would mark new phase in the life of L-159 and would bring significant benefits for Aero and other aerospace manufacturers in the Czech Republic, involved in the program”, according to a press release.

Draken International flies more than 50 military jets, including ex-Polish Air Force Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-21bis, McDonnell Douglas A-4 Skyhawks, Aero Vodochody L-39 Albatros and Alenia Aermacchi MB-339s. Draken is headquartered at Lakeland Linder Regional Airport and offers simulation of enemy aerial targets (aircraft, guided missiles), aerial training, tactical training, electronic warfare, in flight refueling and research and testing services to the US military.

This Polish MiG 21bis was seen in spring 2001 at Malbork airbase, central Poland. It clearly means business since Draken International bought 25 of them (Image © Elmer van Hest)
This Polish MiG 21bis was seen in spring 2001 at Malbork airbase, central Poland. It clearly means business since Draken International bought 25 of them (Image © Elmer van Hest)

Legacy
Aero Vodochody has a good trainer reputation legacy to keep, with the historic L-29 Delfin and the still popular L-39 flying in both military and civilian roles worldwide.

Aero L-29 Delfin advanced training aircraft of company ATS at the 2010 Kecskemet military airshow, Hungary (Magyar). The aircraft with reg. OK-ATS is former Czechoslovakian / Czech Air Force 3238. (Image © Marcel Burger)
Aero L-29 Delfin advanced training aircraft of company ATS at the 2010 Kecskemet military airshow, Hungary (Magyar). The aircraft with reg. OK-ATS is former Czechoslovakian / Czech Air Force 3238. (Image © Marcel Burger)
Hungarian Air Force (Magyar Légierö) Aero L-39ZO Albatros training aircraft with nose number 133 at the 2010 Kecskemét airshow, Hungary. (Image © Marcel Burger)
Hungarian Air Force (Magyar Légierö) Aero L-39ZO Albatros training aircraft with nose number 133 at the 2010 Kecskemét airshow, Hungary. (Image © Marcel Burger)
The Aero L-39 Albatros is quite famous - especially in Europe - thanks to the Breitling Jet Team that visits many airshows every year with its L-39Cs. Seen here in formation at the 2010 Kecskemet military airshow, Hungary (Magyar). (Image © Marcel Burger)
The Aero L-39 Albatros is quite famous – especially in Europe – thanks to the Breitling Jet Team that visits many airshows every year with its L-39Cs. Seen here in formation at the 2010 Kecskemet military airshow, Hungary (Magyar). (Image © Marcel Burger)

© 2013 AIRheads’ Marcel Burger with source information from Aero Vodochody

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Check out the Czech Air Force Orbat at Scramble.nl

After the Dutch, will Belgium choose the F-35 too?

F-35A Lightning IIs perform an aerial refueling mission with a KC-135 Stratotanker May 13, 2013, off the coast of northwest Florida. (Image © USAF / Master Sgt. Donald R. Allen)
F-35A Lightning IIs perform an aerial refueling mission with a KC-135 Stratotanker May 13, 2013, off the coast of northwest Florida. (Image © USAF / Master Sgt. Donald R. Allen)

After the government of neighbouring the Netherlands announced yesterday to go ahead with the purchase of 37 F-35A Lightning II (Joint Strike Fighter), the Belgium government seems eager to choose a similar path.

According to international press agency Reuters on Wednesday September 18, 2013, experts of manufacturer Lockheed Martin have recently briefed Belgian government officials. Several US government senior officials seem to have confirmed this, and Belgian minister of Defence De Crem has confirmed to Belgium medium De Tijd he is interested.

Since Belgium is no high level partner in the early development of the new stealthy American fighter it is unclear when the first Belgian Air Component F-35s could land at Florennes and Kleine Brogel airbases, even if the planes would be procured tomorrow. However, a possible decision is not expected before the end of 2014.

Like the Royal Netherlands Air Force the Belgian Air Component flies the F-16AM and F-16BM Fighting Falcon. Some sources say the Belgians pursue to acquire 35 to 55 new fighter jets, but those numbers seem quite high and only based on the current force strength of 60 F-16s. It is much more likely Brussels will order 24 to 28 new aircraft if one considers the size of the Dutch order and compares the geographical size of Belgium to its northern neighbour.

2 squadrons
This number might mean a squadron of 12 aircraft at both Kleine Brogel and Florennes, with four aircraft in reserve to replace machines lost in accidents, or go the Danish way and put all fighters on one airbase. In that case Kleine Brogel might hold the best cards. One of those is the B-61 nuclear bomb depot of the US Air Force there, a publicly well-known ‘secret’.

French manufacturer Dassault and the French government are expected to put their full weight in trying to win Belgian members of parliament to their side to choose the Dassault Rafale fighter instead. The oppositional Green party already seems reluctant to choose the F-35 – or a new fighter jet as such – and rather goes on the path of European co-operation or division of labour between the European countries.

© 2013 AIRheads’ Marcel Burger

Related posts

Check out the Belgian Air Component Orbat at Scramble.nl

Magic Mirage

So, no more Brazilian Mirages from December on. Well, that’s one reason less to go there, although we are pretty sure there are many reasons left. But that’s future stuff; over the past 25 years or so, Mirages have worked their magic pretty well on us. Let’s see a few.

Yeah, there's two in there. Nice autumn light on these Dijon Deltas. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Yeah, there’s two in there. Nice autumn light on these Dijon Deltas. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The REAL Mirage, according to us. The classic shape of a classic fighter - from Switzerland. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The REAL Mirage, according to us. The classic shape of a classic fighter – from Switzerland. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Spain_MirageF1
The Spanish Mirage F1s ended their flying career earlier in 2013. This one is seen fully active at Florennes, Belgium. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The Swiss also operated Mirages in the recce role. Good thing it came with a great camouflage job. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The Swiss also operated Mirages in the recce role. Good thing it came with a great camouflage job. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Mirages come in bigger size also, but not bigger than this Mirage 4P taking off from Kleine Brogel, Belgium. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Mirages come in bigger size also, but no bigger than this Mirage 4P taking off from Kleine Brogel, Belgium. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Colmar, France, 1995. That about sums it up for this Mirage F1CT. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Colmar, France, 1995. That about sums it up for this Mirage F1CT. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Oh yeah, always finish with something rare, is what we say. Well, it is a shitty picture, but it IS a Moroccan Mirage F1, albeit pictured in Reims, France. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Oh yeah, always finish with something rare, is what we say. Well, it is a shitty picture, but it IS a Moroccan Mirage F1, albeit pictured in Reims, France. (Image © Elmer van Hest)