Tag Archives: Kawasaki

First flight for Norwegian AW101

The first of 16 AgustaWestland AW101 helicopters for the Norwegian Ministry of Justice and Public Security (MoJ) successfully performed its maiden flight at the AgustaWestland Helicopter Division’s Yeovil factory in the UK on 21 March 2016.  This was announced by Finmeccanica on 23 March 2016.

The successful on-schedule maiden flight marks a major milestone and the start of the flight test programme that will lead to initial aircraft deliveries to the MoJ, for operation by the Royal Norwegian Air Force, in 2017. Aircraft deliveries will continue through to 2020.

“I am very pleased that Finmeccanica has reached this important milestone in the SAR helicopter project and thereby making good progress for the replacement of the aging Sea King helicopter with the new state-of-the-art AW101 by 2020,” says the Minister of Justice and Public Security, Mr. Anders Anundsen.

The first Norwegian AW101 during its maiden flight on 21 March from Yeovil airfield (Image © Finmeccanica)
The first Norwegian AW101 during its maiden flight on 21 March from Yeovil airfield (Image © Finmeccanica)

As we reported earlier, the Norwegian Ministry of Justice and Public Security signed a contract for 16 AW101 helicopters plus support and training, back in december 2013, to meet the Norwegian All Weather SAR Helicopter (NAWSARH) requirement based on a new generation aircraft. Each aircraft is provided with an advanced SAR equipment package including a multi-panel AESA (Active Electronically Scanned Array) surveillance radar system, that provides 360° coverage. The large cabin doors and rear ramp provide easy access for personnel, survivors and equipment into the 27 m3 cabin which has stand-up head room throughout.

Finmeccanica’s Helicopter Division will provide initial support and training services, including spares at each of the aircraft operating bases and aircrew training. It will then provide performance based logistic support to deliver approximately 90,000 flying hours across the fleet of 16 helicopters over the initial 15 year period of operation. In support of pilot training, a full flight simulator will be available in Norway in advance of the delivery of the first aircraft.

The AW101 is in service with several air forces. For example, the Danish Air Force already send their AW101 (EH101) for operations in Afghanistan. In 2015, Japan got its first anti-mine AW101 (MCH-101) delivered, produced by Kawasaki Heavy Industries, while the Italian Air Force recently introduced its first CSAR AW101 (HH-101A) into service.

© 2016 Airheadsfly.com editor Dennis Spronk
Featured image: The first Norwegian AW101 during its maiden flight on 21 March from Yeovil airfield (Image © Finmeccanica)

British buy P-8 Poseidon, extra life for Typhoon

In a long awaited announcement, UK prime minister David Cameron on Monday 23 November stated the UK is buying nine Boeing P-8 Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft as part of a strategic defense review. The decision ends a long period of uncertainty about which aircraft should follow in the footsteps of the famed but retired Nimrod. Futhermore, the UK is creating two more Typhoon squadrons.

The Poseidons will be based at Lossiemouth airbase in Scotland and provide the UK with a much needed longe range submarine hunting capability, search and rescue coverage and other maritime duties. The UK joins the US, India and Australia in operating the type. The Japanese Kawasaki P-1 patrol aircraft was also in the race to replace the Nimrod, but an unlikely candidate from the start.

Typhoon

A statement also says the UK will extend the life of multirole Typhoon fighter aircraft for 10 extra years through to 2040, meaning the Royal Air Force will be able to create 2 additional squadrons. This gives the British a total of frontline 7 squadrons, consisting of around 12 aircraft per squadron. Downing Street also announced an investment in Typhoon’s ground attack capability, plus the addition of the latest Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) radar.

F-35

According to sources, London is also said to soon purchase up to 24 F-35B Lightnings to equip its two future aircraft carriers. So far, the British have ordered only ten aircraft, with three already delivered. In total, the UK is planning to get 138 F-35Bs over the next two decades, fulfilling an commitment for the 5th generation and stealthy aircraft made earlier.

Panavia Tornado

Also on the fast jet front, the Panavia Tornado is to retire in 2019, when the final two squadrons hand in their aircraft. Furthermore, 14 out of 24 C-130J Super Hercules transport aircraft will remain in service between 2022 and 2030 to serve alongside new Airbus A400M airlifters.

© 2015 Airheadsfly.com editor Elmer van Hest

First anti-mine MCH-101 chopper to Japan

The Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) received its first Kawasaki Heavy Industries (KHI) MCH-101 Airborne Mine Counter Measures helicopter on 10 March 2015.

The chopper is a licence built version of the AgustaWestland AW101 helicopter. Its equipment includes the Northrop Grumman AN/AQS-24A airborne mine hunting system and the Northrop Grumman AN/AES-1 Airborne Laser Mine Detection System (ALMDS).

Kawasaki Heavy Industries has led the development of the AMCM variant of the AW101/MCH-101, with AgustaWestland providing technical support. The support includes Automatic Flight Control System (AFCS) modified to be able to perform coupled towing patterns with the AN/AQS-24A.

Japan will operate the first MC-101 from Iwakuni Air Base, with the 51st Experimental Squadron before entering operational service in 2016.

The AN/AQS-24A features a high-resolution, side scan sonar for real time, detection, localization and classification of bottom and moored mines at high area coverage rates and a laser line scanner to provide precision optical identification of underwater mines and other objects of interest. Through the ALMDS the data is presented on a mission console in the cabin of the helicopter.

The first MCH-101 is the eight of 13 AW101s that Kawasaki Heavy Industries is building under licence from AgustaWestland for the Japan Maritime Defense Force. Another five MCH-101s are awaiting full configuration, while the JMSDF also received two CH-101s to support Japan’s Antarctic research activities.

Source: AgustaWestland
Featured image: The KHI / AgustaWestland MCH-101 mine-encounter chopper of the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (Image © AgustaWestland)

Japanese Navy aiming for 20 P-1s and 5 Sixty Kilos

The Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force is aiming at acquiring 20 indigenous Kawasaki P-1 maritime patrol aircraft in 2015. Moreover, it demands improvements on the type and the JMSDF will allocate funds to keep its more than 70 Lockheed P-3s up and about.

“The P-1 will be acquired with improved detection capabilities, better flight performance, better information processing capabilities and improved attack capabilities as the successor to the existing fixed-wing patrol aircraft of the JMSDF”, a statement accompanying the FY2015 budget proposal reads.

Kawasaki P-1 prototype 5501 at Atsugi in October 2010 (Image © Robert van Zon)
Featured image: Kawasaki P-1 prototype 5501 at Atsugi in October 2010 (Image © Robert van Zon)

At the same time the Japanese naval forces would like to give three of their P-3Cs a life-extension program to keep numbers and overall force projection at level. According to the most recent, somewhat unreliable data the JMSDF has now at 4 to 6 P-1s semi-mission capable – out of 13 aircraft built. Three aircraft were financed during FY2014, but most machines still undergo testing.

The proposed funding for 20 P-1s in FY2015 might be evidence that most of the problems – like with the engines – are solved or are soon to be solved and that the P-1 program is somewhat back on track.

The Kawasaki P-1 has a top speed of 540 knots and can operate at 44,000 feet and cover 4,970 miles (8,000 km) on a single fuel load. The four hardpoints underneath the fuselage are able to accommodate a diverse weaponry like AGM-84 Harpoon anti-ship missiles, AGM-65 Maverick air-to-surface missiles or torpedoes and free-fall bombs.

Pacific Ocean, 22 March 2006. A JMSDF SH-60J departs the flight deck of the aircraft carrier CVN72 USS Abraham Lincoln (Image © Photographer's Mate Airman James R. Evans / USN)
Pacific Ocean, 22 March 2006. A JMSDF SH-60J departs the flight deck of the aircraft carrier CVN72 USS Abraham Lincoln (Image © Photographer’s Mate Airman James R. Evans / USN)

Rotary wing
The maritime rotary wing of Land of the Rising Sun is likely to see an increase of 5 new Sikorsky SH-60K Seahawk anti-submarine and anti-ship helicopters, while a pair of older SH-60Js will undergo a life-extension program.

The navy also wants to spend money to develop a third new patrol helicopter mostly aimed to counter the growing threat of Chinese submersibles in the sometimes shallow waters around Japans many islands. Moreover, there are plans to start a new Coastal Observation Unit for surveillance duties and the deployment of Japanese troops to Yonaguni island “for conducting coastal observation of ships and aircraft passing through nearby areas”.

© 2015 Airheadsfly.com editor Marcel Burger, including source information provided by the Japan Ministry of Defense

↑ Check our 2013 wonderful Photo Report of the Japanese Defence Forces’ Air Assets, by Robert van Zon

Japan buys new P-1s and Sea Hawks, invests in P-3

Kawasaki P-1 prototype 5501 at Atsugi in October 2010 (Image © Robert van Zon)
Kawasaki P-1 prototype 5501 at Atsugi in October 2010 (Image © Robert van Zon)

The Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) procures three additional P-1 maritime patrol aircraft in 2014, but will also invest in upgrading the old P-3 Orion fleet.

According to the official FY2014 budget the Ministry of Defense will pay 59.4 billion yen (US$ 6.2 billion) for the P-1, an indigenous four engine jet maritime patrol and surveillance platform produced by Kawasaki. They will be added to the current fleet of four aircraft. “The P-1 has an improved detection and discernment capability, better flight performance, greater information processing capability and a more advanced attack capability as a successor to the existing Lockheed P-3C fleet”, writes a defence official.

However Tokyo is not saying goodbye to the turboprop Orions that quickly. In fact, it puts the equivalent of US$ 15.6 million into a life-extension program for three P-3Cs and another 12.5 million into nose-mounted infrared detection systems and radars for a not released number of other P-3s of the fleet.

Roof collapse
Japan is slowly replacing the aging Lockheed P-3C, of which it still has about 75 aircraft in its inventory. Moreover the JMSDF has five EP-3C ELINT, three OP-3C optical reconnaissance, one UP-3C test and three UP-3D training aircraft. However, six Orions were extensively damaged – probably considered beyond repair – when the roof collapsed of the hangar they were in at Atsugi on 17 February this year.

Sea Hawks
The helicopter fleet of the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force will also see some capability improvements, with the procurement of four Mitsubishi (Sikorsky) SH-60K Seahawks, while two SH-60Js will undergo overhaul to enable them to serve longer. Currently 46 Julliets and 39 Kilos serve with the JMSDF. Another 19 UH-60J serve as search-and-rescue helicopter.

© 2014 AIRheads’ editor Marcel Burger based on source information provided by the Japan Ministry of Defense

Pacific Ocean, 22 March 2006. A JMSDF SH-60J departs the flight deck of the aircraft carrier CVN72 USS Abraham Lincoln (Image © Photographer's Mate Airman James R. Evans / USN)
Pacific Ocean, 22 March 2006. A JMSDF SH-60J departs the flight deck of the aircraft carrier CVN72 USS Abraham Lincoln (Image © Photographer’s Mate Airman James R. Evans / USN)