Tag Archives: Growler

RAAF receives first Boeing EA-18 Growlers

The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) on Tuesday received its first two Boeing EA-18G Growlers. Both jets are part of an Australian order of twelve jets. The Growlers are electronic warfare variants of the F/A-18F Super Hornet and are capable of disrupting, deceiving or denying a broad range of military electronic systems, including radars and communications.

The 12 EA-18G Growlers will be based at Amberley airbase and will operate in conjunction with Australian air, land and sea forces. The Growlers are a vital part of plan Jericho, wich aims to transform the RAAF into one of the most advanced air forces in the world by seeking maximum network integration with Australian army and navy forces.

All remaining Australian Growlers are due for delivery this year. The country already operates a fleet of 24 F/A-18F Super Hornets, plus 71 older F/A-18A/.B Hornets.

Featured image: Two RAAF Growlers. (Image © Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)

 

Unveiled: first Aussie EA-18G Growler

The first Boeing EA-18G Growler for the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) was rolled out on Wednesday 29 July by Boeing and the US Navy. Australia has twelve of the electronic warfare aircraft on order under a foreign military sales agreement with the US Navy, and is the second country to operate the type following the US.

The Growler will fly to Naval Air Station (NAS) China Lake, California, for flight testing. It is then expected to head for NAS Whidbey Island, Washington, for training purposes. RAAF electronic warfare operators will train with US Navy pilots to gain expertise in the highly technical electronic warfare mission. The RAAF is expected to take delivery of the aircraft in-country in 2017.

The Growler is derivative of the F/A-18 Super Hornet and according toe Boeing, is the only aircraft in production providing tactical jamming and electronic protection. Australia already operates a fleet of older F/A-18A and B Hornets, plus 24 newer F/A-18F Super Hornets.

Reshaping
“The Growlers will complement our existing and future air combat capability, and we will be much more lethal,” said Air Marshal Geoff Brown, former chief of the RAAF. “In many respects, it’s the final piece of the jigsaw puzzle for the RAAF.” Australia is working to reshape the RAAF into an integrated, networked force able to deliver air power in all operating environments. The project is named Plan Jericho.

Wednesday 29 July proved a good day for the RAAF, as the service also saw the delivery of its seventh Boeing C-17A Globemaster III.

© 2015 Airheadsfly.com editor Elmer van Hest
Featured image (top):  The first Growler in RAAF colours. (Image © Boeing Defense / Twitter)

Carrier Air Wing will fight from unready ship

Featured image: Carrier Air Wing 5 on board nuclear aircraft carrier USS George Washington on October 11th, 2013.
(Image © Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Chris Cavagnaro/USN)

There is a big risk that the first Carrier Air Wing to board the newly build US aircraft carrier CVN 78 USS Gerald R Ford will have to operate in far less than ideal situations. The General Accountability Office (GAO) – or the guys and girls that keep track of government spending – slapped the US Department of Defense on the wrist on 20 November 2014. Roughly translated: the US military will have a ship – and with that the air wing on board – that is far less capable to enter combat then it’s supposed to be.

The most disturbing part for the aviators is the number of aircraft launches and landings, that seems to be less than what they need in order to be effective. The GAO puts it like this: “The Navy will have a ship that is less complete than initially planned at ship delivery, but at a greater cost.” And even after the Ford will be handed over in 2016 the US tax payers have to cough up an additional US$ 988 million to finish the semi-ready vessel, on top of the US$ 12.9 billion the vessel already is supposed to cost.

Over the wires! (Screenshot © YouTube)
Over the wires! The F-35C on board the USS Nimitz during sea trials of the aircraft. (Footage © US Navy)

Super Hornets
Aircraft that will board the Ford will be launched by electromagnetic catapults, in stead of the steam-powered launch facilities on the current 10 Nimitz-class vessels and all its modern predecessors. But so far the innovation has not promised the required amount of launches in a certain time frame, meaning the ship might be put into a war situation without having the necessary capabilities. That means the F/A-18E/F Super Hornets, EA-18G Growlers, E-2 Hawkeyes and maybe even the future F-35Cs will be operate from a base that is in less than ideal conditions.

Weaponry
The electromagnetic field that will propel the aviators off the ship would in theory enable them as to bring along more than 225 percent additional weaponry or other payload, compared to the current situation on the Nimitz-class carriers. This would make it easier for the air crew to either hit the target harder or conduct longer missions with less aerial refuellings.

Operational
CVN 79 USS John F Kennedy, the second Ford-class carrier, is on its way as well. But considering the current criticism the question is why the rush when even its brother Ford is disappointing. “After the planned investment CVN 78 may not achieve improved operational performance over the Nimitz class of aircraft carriers as promised for some time to come,” according to the GAO report.

© 2014 Airheadsfly.com editor Marcel Burger, based on an official GAO report

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A F/A-18E Super Hornet, attached to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 31, and a F/A-18F Super Hornet, attached to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 213, prepare to launch from the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) to conduct strike missions against ISIL/ISIS targets. (Image © Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Robert Burck/USN)
A F/A-18E Super Hornet, attached to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 31, and a F/A-18F Super Hornet, attached to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 213, prepare to launch from the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) to conduct strike missions against ISIL/ISIS targets. (Image © Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Robert Burck/USN)
Computer rendering of the future CVN 78 USS Gerald R Ford (Image © US Navy)
Computer rendering of the future CVN 78 USS Gerald R Ford (Image © US Navy)

US Senate eager to support A-10s and Growlers

An USAFE Spangdahlem A-10 Thunderbolt II against a perfect blue sky performing a fly-by of Kleine Brogel AB, Belgium, during the 2001 NATO Tiger Meet. Digital scan. (Image © Marcel Burger)
An USAFE Spangdahlem A-10 Thunderbolt II against a perfect blue sky performing a fly-by of Kleine Brogel AB, Belgium, during the 2001 NATO Tiger Meet. Digital scan. (Image © Marcel Burger)

The US Senate seems eager to keep the mighty Fairchild Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II flying for at least another year, thereby crossing the Pentagon and the US Air Force top brass that in February said they wanted to kill the famous tank killer of the 1990-1991 Iraq War.

The Senate Appropriations Committee (SAC) made its own version of the US Department of Defense FY2015 plan, willing to pump 548 billion dollars extra into the military spending. In the plan presented on 17 July 2014 not only the A-10s – nicknamed Warthog – will stay airborne, but it foresees also in more EA-18G Growlers the US Navy is advocating hard for. As we at Airheadsfly.com reported earlier the USN hopes to get an additional 22 of these electronic attack aircraft. Manufacturer Boeing has put in a helping hand, declaring at the 2014 Farnborough International Airshow this week it is very much willing to keep the Super Hornet production line open. The EA-18G is a F/A-18E/F Super Hornet derivative.

With the SAC plan it is now up to the full US Senate to decide over the alternative plan for the air assets of the US armed forces. So far no date has been set yet on when the issue is going to be addressed at Capitol Hill.

© 2014 Airheadsfly.com editor Marcel Burger

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A pair of US Navy EA-18G Growlers over the American dessert (Image © Boeing)
A pair of US Navy EA-18G Growlers over the American dessert (Image © Boeing)

100th Growler, but US Navy pleads for more

U.S. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Micah Smith, 135th Electronic Attack Squadron flight captain, Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Washington, directs the pilot of an EA-18G Growler out of a parking spot prior to a training mission, 29 January 2014, at Nellis Air Force Base (Image © Airman 1st Class Joshua Kleinholz / USAF)
USN Petty Officer 3rd Class Micah Smith, 135th Electronic Attack Squadron flight captain, Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Washington, directs the pilot of an EA-18G Growler out of a parking spot prior to a training mission during Red Flag 14-01, 29 January 2014, at Nellis Air Force Base (Image © Airman 1st Class Joshua Kleinholz / USAF)

The US Navy received its 100th Boeing (McDonnell Douglas) EA-18G Growler tactical jamming and electronic warfare jet on 5 May 2014. But the American maritime strike force wants more.

As we reported earlier the US Navy put 22 Growlers on its list of unfunded priorities for the 2015 Fiscal Year budget. Not only wants the force to make sure they will have enough airplanes of the type in the near future, a final approval of the 22 EA-18Gs will also keep Boeing’s Hornet production line open. After all, the Growler is a direct derivative of the F/A-18 Super Hornet.

Current orders take Growler and Super Hornet production through the end of 2016, according to Boeing. During testimony on 27 March 2014 to the US Senate Armed Services Committee, Admiral Jonathan Greenert, chief of naval operations, described the Growler as an “extraordinary capability” and emphasized the need for more aircraft.

Source: Boeing

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