Tag Archives: France

PC-21s for France, Jordan and UK

Pilatus Aircraft on Wednesday 4 January announced three seperate orders for a total of 21 PC-21 training turboprop aircraft. Seventeen of those are for the French Air Force, while the Royal Jordanian Air Force and QinetiQ, a UK company which operates the Empire Test Pilots’ School (ETPS), take two each. The total order is worth 280 million EUR.

France

In 2016, the French Air Force opted for the PC-21 to replace older Alpha Jet trainers now in use for training fast jet pilots. On 30 December, the French signed a contact with Babcock Mission Critical Services France (BMCSF) in which subcontractor Pilatus supplies 17 PC-21s for French Air Force training purposes.

QinetiQ

QinetiQ is ordering two PC-21s for the famed ETPS at Boscome Down airfield in the UK. The PC-21s with their modified flight instruments will be used to train test pilots and flight test engineers for customers from the United Kingdom and elsewhere.

Royal Jordanian Air Force

The Royal Jordanian Air Force already ordered eight PC-21s earlier, after first eyeing the less advanced PC-9. The Jordanian now have ten PC-21 on orders. First deliveries are set for mid-2017.

Germany fed up with A400M, set to buy C-130 with France

Germany is set to buy and operate four to six Lockheed Martin C-130J Super Hercules transport aircraft in a joint effort with France, German reports say on Tuesday 4 October. Berlin with such a move clearly shows it doesn’t have much faith in the Airbus A400M, which is now being delivered to the German Luftwaffe at a painfully slow rate while also showing shortcomings for which Berlin seeks compensation.

The Hercules aircraft are to be delivered in 2021 and based in France, according to sources. They would be fitted especially for special operations and be able to operate from unpaved runways.

Signal
If anything, the purchase is a clear signal to Airbus that the Germans are fed up with the A400M. Germany has 53 of the type on order but only saw delivery of a handful of aircraft as a result of production delays and operational limitations. Berlin now apparently think the A400M will never be the ‘tactical’ airlifter it thought it ordered.

France already ordered four C-130J Super Hercules aircraft earlier, while Germany was known before to also look at other options apart from the A400M. A joint purchase of new C-130s was never on the cards, however. The German-Franco aircraft will likely be stationed at Orleans airbase in France, home to the existing French Hercules fleet.

Could it be? Indian cabinet clears Rafale deal

Could it really, really be true after all? Several sources have just confirmed that the Indian cabinet has agreed to the purchade of 36 Dassault Rafales in an 8.8 billion USD deal with France. A contract is said to be signed on Friday in New Delhi, which would concluded one of the most ridicilously long negotiations in defense history ever.

What really is true, is that a deal was said to have been closed several times before. What is also true, is that India has been eyeing the Rafale for much longer than Qatar and Egypt ever have, while the latter two ordered their Rafales last year. Dassault probably gave them a nice discount to lure India in further.

India was once in the market for up to 126 Rafales, but that option was deed to costly. Also, India wanted to produce the aircraft mostly in-country while France was hesitant the transfer the required technology. New Delhi meanwhile studied the Su-30 Flanker, F-18 Hornet, Saab Gripen and Lockheed Martin F-16 also.

It should be interesting to see how the final contract turns out. If there is such a contract, of course.

© 2016 Airheadsfly.com editor Elmer van Hest

 

 

France forces Mirage 2000Ds to fight on and go low

Despite having about 100 Dassault Rafale B/Cs in the Air Force inventory, France sees itself forced to keep its older Mirage 2000D operational to keep the ground attack capabilities of the Armée de l’Air at proper levels. It even wants the Deltas to drop below altitudes they were not meant to do when designed – learning from recent missions in the skies of Southwest Asia.

Dassault Aviation received the order – by French defence procurement agency DGA – to renovate 55 Mirage 2000Ds. The modification include weapon system updates, the gun pod and Mica missiles of the aircraft version of the Mirage 2000 that is especially adapted for ground attack.

The Mirage 2000D entered service in 1993 and is the “less terrifying” sister of the Mirage 2000N designed for nuclear strike. In fact, the aircraft are basically the same with the Delta used for long-range strikes with conventional Apache, Scalp and Mica missiles. The first flight of the 2000D was in 1991, roughly 5 years after the 2000N. Lacking an on-board gun, has proven to be a miss during recent combat operations in Afghanistan, Libya (Operations Harmattan / Unified Protector) and Central Africa / Mali (Serval, now Barkhane) and combating the so-called Islamic State forces in Iraq and Syria (ISIS / Daesh(.

Mirage 2000D operations

During the operations of the last few years the Mirage 2000Ds often flew with just a pair of 500 lbs GBU-12 laser-guided or GBU-49 gps-/laser-guided bombs and two external fuel tanks. Adding the gun pod means the French Air Force wants to add a more effective close-air support to the Mirage 2000D – something that the aircraft was not designed to do but may work well in low-threat environments. The new modifications are believed to have been mostly “inspired” by the recent deployments against ISIS / Daesh.

The newest French multi-role fighters Dassault Rafale B (two-seat) and C (single-seat) initially were introduced with air-to-air capabilities (F1) only. The latest Dassault Rafale B/C have been delivered in F3 standard (fully multi-role, including nuclear strike) but reportedly not all Rafale F1s have been fully upgraded yet to F3.

Mirage 2000D bases

French Air Force Mirage 2000Ds fly from BA133 Nancy/Ochey (France), BA188 Djibouti/Ambouli (East Africa) plus a pair normally deployed to Niamey/Diori Hamani in Niger in support of Operation Barkhane.

© 2016 Airheadsfly.com senior contributor Marcel Burger
Featured image (top): A Mirage 2000 taking off (Image © Elmer van Hest)

Final flight for French Etendards

After 42 years, it’s all over for the Dassault Super Etendard in French service. The final flight was scheduled for Tuesday 12 July at Landivisiau airbase, close to the French Atlantic coast. In its career, the sea was familiar territory for the Etendard, as the type was also operated from French Navy aircraft carriers.

The final flight was performed in front of hundreds of spectators at Landivisiau. Only five jets remained in service until the very end, although a significant number of Etendards still participated in operations against co-called Islamic State forces untill recently, flying from a French carrier.

Iraq

Less known is the fact that France leased some Etendards to Iraq in the Eighties. Iraq then used the aircraft to employ the feared Exocet anti-shipping missiles at Iranian vessels in the Persian Gulf. The jets eventually returned to France,

The Dassault Rafale of course replaces the Etendard in French service, with several dozen already in service. The last Etendards will probably find their way to museums in technical schools.

The world’s last Etendards are now to be found in Argentina, which operates just a few aircraft. These jets earned their fame in the 1982 Falklands war.

© 2016 Airheadsfly.com editor Elmer van Hest

One of the classic shapes in aviation. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
One of the classic shapes in aviation. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
A French super Etendard, seen at Landivisiau. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
A French super Etendard, seen at Landivisiau. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Not all Dassault Super Etendards look the same... (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Not all Dassault Super Etendards look the same… (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The French Etendards have a thing for Tigers. By their standards, these are rather boring tiger markings. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The French Etendards have a thing for Tigers. By their standards, these are rather boring tiger markings. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Superbe! A Super Etendard looking old skool at the Le Bourget Salon in june 1991. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Superbe! A Super Etendard looking old skool at the Le Bourget Salon in June 1991. (Image © Elmer van Hest)