Tag Archives: Fokker 70

Air Niugini takes 7 ex-KLM Fokker 70s

Air Niugini, the national airline of Papua New Guinea, is the new user of seven ex-KLM Royal Dutch Airlines Fokker 70s. The two-engine short-haul jetliners will be phased out starting in December 2015, when the first new two KLM Embraer 190s arrive at Amsterdam-Schiphol IAP.

Archive photo of a Fokker 28 of Austrian Arrows at Stockholm-Arlanda IAP. Austrian Arrows has merged in Austrian Airlines (Image © Marcel Burger)
RELATED POST: Thirty-six Fokker aircraft found new home
Air Niugini has been adopting ex-KLM machines before. In September 2013 a Fokker 100 was transferred, followed by a Fokker 70 in October 2014.

The Fokker 70 – one of the last types of commercial airliners developped in the Netherlands – has served KLM for 21 years. The KLM Cityhopper fleet will in the future consist entirely of Brazilian made Embraer 190s (30 aircraft) and 175s (15 aircraft), making KLM the largest Embraer E-Jet user in Europe.

KLM took its first Fokker 70 into service in 1994. Between 1994 and 1997, a total of 47 Fokker 70s were built, as well as one prototype. The F70 was operated by 15 different carriers worldwide. KLM Cityhopper has the biggest F70 fleet, operating 18 of these aircraft through December 2015. Together, the Fokker 70 and its bigger brother, the F100, have racked up more than 10 million flight hours for KLM. The Fokker 100 was phased out of the KLM fleet in 2012. KLM also operated the turboprop Fokker 50, until 28 March 2010.

The average age of the Fokker 70 is almost 20 years, with each aircraft having operated an average of 37,000 flight hours and as many take-offs and landings.

Source: KLM Royal Dutch Airlines
Featured image: A KLM Fokker 70 (Image © KLM Royal Dutch Airlines)

Remnants of Dutch aviation pride change hands

The remnants of what was once the pride of the Dutch aviation industry is changing hands. Fokker Technologies has been sold to GKN for 706 million euro, increasing GKN’s position of one of the largest produces of aircraft parts worldwide once the authorities that guard monopolies in both Europe and the United States agree with GKN’s purchase.

A KLM Embraer 190 at Amsterdam-Schiphol International Airport (Image © KLM)
RELATED POST:
KLM buys 17 Embraer E-Jets, exit Fokker 70

Fokker Technologies currently produces lightweight aircraft parts, cables and landing gear, plus it does aircraft maintenance and logistics. It is a surviving heritage of the once larger Fokker (Aerospace) that produced hundreds of military and commercial aircraft between 1912 and 1996 – when the company was declared bankrupt. Started by Anthony Fokker in 1912 in Germany, the aircraft manufacturer moved in 1919 to the Netherlands.

The F.27 Friendship became Fokker’s most successful passenger aircraft after World War II, with almost 600 produced plus another 206 by US company Fairchild. Despite that aircraft as a whole have no longer been produced since 1996, the latest models Fokker 50, Fokker 70 and Fokker 100 are still fairly popular and remain operational with airlines and air forces world wide.

A serious attempt since 2010 by the company called Rekkof (“Fokker” spelled backwards) to redevelop and restart production of larger version of the Fokker 70 (F90NG) and a larger version of the Fokker 100 (F120NG) with financial support from the Dutch government has so far not led to the actual start-up of an assembly line.

© 2015 Airheadsfly.com editor Marcel Burger
Featured image (top): A KLM Cityhopper Fokker 70 landing at Bristol Airport, United Kingdom (Image (PD) Adrian Pingstone)

Dutch pride in the shape of a Fokker F.27 Friendship. This Royal Netherlands Air Force aircraft was pictures in July 1996, only four months after its builder Fokker 27 was declared bankrupt - a not so proud moment in Dutch aviation history.  (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Dutch pride in the shape of a Fokker F.27 Friendship. This Royal Netherlands Air Force aircraft was pictures in July 1996, only four months after its builder Fokker 27 was declared bankrupt – a not so proud moment in Dutch aviation history. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The recently transfered Fokker 50 U-06 in its former Royal Netherlands Air Force livery (Image © Ministerie van Defensie)
The Fokker 50 U-06 in Royal Netherlands Air Force livery (Image © Ministerie van Defensie)
One of the Fokker 60UTAs that the Peruvian Naval Aviation commissioned in 2010 (Image © Marina de Guerra del Perú
One of the Fokker 60UTAs that the Peruvian Naval Aviation commissioned in 2010 (Image © Marina de Guerra del Perú
Archive photo of a Fokker 28 of Austrian Arrows at Stockholm-Arlanda IAP. Austrian Arrows has merged in Austrian Airlines (Image © Marcel Burger)
Archive photo of a Fokker 28 of Austrian Arrows at Stockholm-Arlanda IAP. Austrian Arrows has merged in Austrian Airlines (Image © Marcel Burger)

KLM buys 17 Embraer E-Jets, exit Fokker 70

KLM Cityhopper announced on 30 March 2015 the purchase of 17 new Embraer E-Jets to replace its Fokker 70 aircraft. The deal is for 15 E175s and two E190s. The latter will arrive in December 2015, while the E175s are expected between March 2016 and June 2018.

Archive photo of a Fokker 28 of Austrian Arrows at Stockholm-Arlanda IAP. Austrian Arrows has merged in Austrian Airlines (Image © Marcel Burger)
RELATED POST:
36 Fokker aircraft found new home
With the purchase the end is in sight for a historical Dutch product flown by a major Dutch operator. The Fokker 70’s first flight was on 4 April 1993 at its location of Woensdracht in the Netherlands. The aircraft is a derivative of the Fokker 28 and that’s why the type is officially registered as F28-0070. KLM received the Fokker 70s from the successors of the original manufacturer, as the company started by Anthony Fokker in 1919 in the Netherlands went bankrupt mainly due to bad management in 1996. The first KLM Cityhopper Fokker 70 was delivered in on 22 January 1997, the last on 25 March 2000.

Between 1992 and 1997 only 47 Fokker 70s were produced. KLM Cityhopper has been the biggest operator of the type. A Fokker 70 serves as the government flight of the Netherlands, while the Kenyan Air Force flies one for its president. The other operators are Tyrolean Airways / Austrian Airlines (6), Insel Air (3) and Alliance Airlines (8) in Australia. Fokker Services – one of the successors of Fokker – owns one Fokker 70. The rest of the Fokker 70s are mostly flying in VIP configuration as a luxury company business jet.

Incident
The Fokker 70 is powered by two Rolls-Royce Tay 620 turbofans. It has a cruising speed of 456 knots (525 mph or 845 kmh), a range of 2,119 miles (3,410 km) and a service ceiling of 36,000 feet. The only known incident was with an Austrian Airlines jet on 5 January 2004, when it crash-landed on Munich IAP in Germany after ice built up in the engines upon descent. Luckily the crash resulted in no serious injuries to any of the 28 passengers and four crew, with almost all escaped shaken but unharmed.

A KLM Cityhopper Fokker 70 landing at Bristol Airport, United Kingdom (Image (PD) Adrian Pingstone)
A KLM Cityhopper Fokker 70 landing at Bristol Airport, United Kingdom (Image (PD) Adrian Pingstone)

Introduction
The introduction of the Embraer E175 and the retirement of the Fokker 70 will be done gradually. KLM Cityhopper together with partner Air France regional daughter Hop! also signed an option for another 17 Embraer E-Jets.

With the arrival of the new aircraft KLM Cityhopper is able to transport 100 passengers on the E190s and 88 on the E175, against 80 on the Fokker 70. The E175 has a slightly shorter range than the Fokker 70: 1,800 miles (3,334 km) with a typical cruising speed of 447 knots (515 mph or 828 kmh). It has a service ceiling of 41,000 feet. Embraer aircraft are not a new sight for KLM Cityhopper. The Dutch daughter of the oldest still existing airline (KLM) flies 28 Embraer E190s.

KLM Cityhopper’s current 47 aircraft make about 300 flights a day, all within Europe, to 54 destinations. Business travellers are the core of the 18,000 passengers that fly daily with the company.

© 2015 Airheadsfly.com editor Marcel Burger

Say hello to the KLM Embraer E190 (Image © KLM)
Say hello to the KLM Embraer E190 (Image © KLM)
A KLM Embraer 190 at Amsterdam-Schiphol International Airport (Image © KLM)
A KLM Embraer 190 at Amsterdam-Schiphol International Airport (Image © KLM)

Thirty-six Fokker aircraft found new home

Thirty-six Fokker aircraft found a new home in 2014, with four new as well as nine existing Fokker operators, the Dutch company announced. Fokker Services – one of the successors of the legendary Fokker company – placed thirteen Fokker 50s, ten Fokker 70s and seven Fokker 100s. The leases on another two Fokker 50s were extended, as well as on four Fokker 100s.

“Latin America continues to represent a significant market,” a company statement reads. “Fast-expanding Insel Air, based in the Netherlands Antilles, has added 4 Fokker 50s, making 7 in total, while also taking 3 long-range Fokker 70s to expand its international network. In Surinam Fly All Ways also took delivery of 2 Fokker 70s. Mexico’s Air Cuahonte (Mayair) took delivery of a Fokker 50 to grow its regional operations. The Peru Navy, which operates all 4 Fokker 60 aircraft, also took delivery of 2 Fokker 50s.

The Fokker 50 popularity increased in Africa. Four airlines added a total of 6 Fokker 50s to their fleets. Kazakhstan’s Bek Air added 2 Fokker 100s to its fleet, making a total of 6, serving both scheduled and charter routes.

In Germany ACMI specialist Avanti Air purchased 2 Fokker 100s and started operating this month, while Dutch Denim put 2 Fokker 100s on its AOC. An undisclosed operator also purchased 1 Fokker 100.
Papua New Guinea’s Air Niugini added an initial long-range Fokker 70 to its fleet of 7 Fokker 100s. Transnusa from Indonesia also took delivery of a Fokker 70, while leases on a couple of Fokker 50s were extended. Virgin Australia Regional Airlines had leases on 4 Fokker 100s extended as well, while Australian stalwart operator Alliance added 3 Fokker 70s to its ever growing Fokker fleet.

Fokker Services does not sell nor lease Fokker aircraft itself, but supports others who do. More than 500 Fokker aircraft remain operational worldwide, while the last aircraft – a Fokker 70 – left the factory of the in 1996 bankrupt declared Dutch aircraft company in 1997.

Source: Fokker Services
Featured image: Archive photo of a Fokker 28 of Austrian Arrows at Stockholm-Arlanda IAP. Austrian Arrows has merged in Austrian Airlines (Image © Marcel Burger)

KLM adds six more Embraer 190s to fleet

A KLM Embraer 190 (Image © KLM)
A KLM Embraer 190 (Image © KLM)

KLM Royal Dutch Airlines will add an additional six Embraer 190 passenger jets to its Cityhopper short-haul fleet, announced the Dutch airline on July 24th, 2013.

The new aircraft will be leased from BOC Aviation which purchased the aircraft from the Brazilian manufacturer. The six Embraer 190s will replace seven Fokker 70s between November 2013 and April 2014.

KLM Cityhopper is a full daughter company of KLM, which is since 2004 part of Air France-KLM. The soon to be 28 Embraer 190 and 19 Fokker 70 Cityhopper aircraft make about 100,000 flights per year, operating from Amsterdam Schiphol airport to serve 49 European destinations. Compared to the Fokker 70 the Embraer 190 uses less fuel, has less CO2 exhaust, offers passengers more space and flies faster. The Embraer 190 accommodates up to a 100 passengers, against 80 aboard the Fokker 70. Eventuallly KLM will retire all Fokkers.

Source: KLM