Tag Archives: F-5

Another double crash for display teams

As if last week’s crash of a Blue Angel and Thunderbird on the same day wasn’t strange enough, a Patrouille Suisse F-5 Tiger and Russian Knights Su-27 Flanker crashed within hours of each other on Thursday 9 June. The Swiss pilot ejected after an apparent mid air collision over Leeuwarden airbase in the Netherlands, while the Russian pilot died in a crash near Moscow.

The Swiss F-5s collided while practicing their display routine prior to the Leeuwarden airshow on Friday. One aircraft came down near the town of Bitgum, north west of the airbase. Rescue service confirmed the pilot ejected. An Air Medical Services helicopter was dispatched to the crash site.

The second F-5 involved in the incident landed safely after half an hour or so, minus half of its right hand horizontal stabilizer. The trailing edge of the right wing also showed some damage from the collision.

Friday’s airshow at Leeuwarden marks the international airshow debut of the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II. On Thursday evening, the Royal Netherlands Air Force (RNLAF) announced the show is going ahead as planned.

The cause of the Russian crash is unknown so far.

Cracks: Swiss retire ten Tigers

The Swiss Air Force is retiring ten out of 36 operational F-5 Tigers due to structural cracks found in the aicraft. As reported earlier here on Airheadsfly.com, cracks where found last year in some Tigers. Inspections on all aircraft have now finished and problems were found on 16 in total. Six will be repaired, ten will be disposed of.

Repair costs for the six savable aircraft are estimated at 1 million Swiss francs, which roughly equals 1 million euro. Among these six are five aircraft used by aerial demonstration team Patrouille Suisse.

The Swiss will see their active F-5 Tiger fleet reduced from 36 to 26 by this decision, made possible by fleet optimization and leading to cost savings. Between 1978 and 1984, the Swiss Air Force ordered a total of 98 single-seat F-5E and 12 two-seat F-5F aircraft. A significant number was since sold the US Navy, which has been using the Tigers as aggressor aircraft. A total of 54 F-5 is still being kept in Switzerland, with some being stored.

Assessment of the Swiss fleet carried out together with RUAG and Armasuisse. Repairs are expected to last until the end of the first quarter of 2016. Patrouille Suisse will partly use regular F-5s until all of their red and white aircraft are repaired.

The decision confirms that the Swiss will use their F-5s also from 2016 on. Earlier reports indicated that all Tigers would be retired in that year, but parliament in Bern decided otherwise.

© 2015 Airheadsfly.com editor Elmer van Hest
Featured image: No more happy landings for ten Swiss Tiger. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

Overview: Yemen Air Strikes

UPDATED 21APRIL 2015 | The Royal Saudi Air Force (RSAF) led air strikes on Houthi rebel positions in neighbouring Yemen has got a broad military support from many other Arab nations. As Airheadsfly.com got new data the RSAF F-15S (Strike) Eagles and EF2000 Typhoons didn’t fly into combat alone at all.

If our sources are correct the United Arab Emirates Air Force sent 30 of its fighter jets, mainly Lockheed Martin F-16E/F Desert Falcons and possibly a number of Dassault Mirage 2000s. The Royal Bahraini Air Force (RBAF) and Kuwait Air Force both said to have contributed about 15 combat jets each. If true, the relatively large RBAF contribution is remarkable, since the country has only about 15 to 17 operational F-16Cs and eight remaining and aging Northrop F-5Es.

The Kuwait Air Force used almost half of its 35 McDonnell Douglas (Boeing) F/A-18C/D Hornet fleet. The Qatar Emiri Air Force scrambled up to ten of its Mirage 2000s, while the Royal Jordanian Air Force flew six of its Lockheed Martin F-16s into combat in the Yemen.

Air Assets Operation Restoring Hope (known as Decisive Storm until the end of April 2015)

  • Royal Saudi Air Force (RSAF):
    100 aircraft, including Boeing F-15C Eagle air-superiority fighters, Boeing F-15S (Strike) Eagles, Eurofighter EF2000 Typhoon multi-role fighters, Panavia Tornado interdictor / strike aircraft, Boeing E-3 Sentry AWACS aircraft, Boeing AH-64 Apache attack helicopters (unconfirmed), Aérospatiale (Airbus Helicopter) AS532M Cougar CSAR helicopters
  • United Arab Emirates Air Force (UAEAF):
    30 fighter jets of Lockheed Martin F-16E/F Desert Falcon and Dassault Mirage 2000 type
  • Kuwait Air Force (KAF):
    15 McDonnell Douglas F/A-18C/D Hornet multirole fighters. Some or all operating from King Khalid Airbase (Khamis Mushayt) in Saudi Arabia.
  • Royal Bahraini Air Force (RBAF):
    15 aircraft of the Lockheed Martin F-16C Fighting Falcon and Northrop F-5 type
  • Qatar Emiri Air Force (QEAF):
    10 Mirage 2000-5 fighters. Some or all operating from King Khalid Airbase (Khamis Mushayt) in Saudi Arabia.
  • Royal Jordanian Air Force (RDAF):
    6 Lockheed Martin (General Dynamics) F-16A/B Fighting Falcon multirole fighters
  • Royal Moroccan Air Force:
    6 Lockheed Martin F-16C/D Fighting Falcon multirole fighters
  • Sudanese Air Force:
    3 to 6 Sukhoi Su-24 strike aircraft. Operating from King Khalid Airbase (Khamis Mushayt) in Saudi Arabia. Moreover the Sudanese Air Force has likely deployed some of its four C-130 Hercules and possible its two Shaanxi Y-8 transport aircraft in support
  • Egyptian Air Force:
    contribution unknown
  • US Air Force (USAF):
    Boeing KC-135 Stratofortress upon Saudi request. First refuelling mission flown on 8 April 2015.

Focusing
The air strikes are focusing on Houthi rebel positions, air defence sites, air bases and Sanaa international airport, command-and-control locations and army camps in Sanaa, Saada and Taiz. The first strikes were launched on 25 or 26 March 2015, with ground forces engaged as well in what has been dubbed Operation Decisive Storm. Officially it takes place under the flag of the Cooperation Council for the Arab States of the Gulf or Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC), of which Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates are the members.

Footage posted by AlAribya on YouTube

Saudi Arabia has said to have committed a 100 aircraft, as well as 150,000 ground forces. The six F-16C/D Fighting Falcons that the Royal Moroccan Air Force already had in the United Arab Emirates to fight ISIS in Iraq have also been retasked with supporting the Saudi-led operations in Yemen. Sudan committed three combat aircraft, Sukhoi Su-24s (“Fencer”) sources say. Egypt pledged its support as well, but there is no information yet on how many and which aircraft it will sent.

The US Armed Forces are not directly taking part in the military ops, but do provide essential tanker support, according to sources to USA Today.

A Royal Saudi Air Force E-3 Sentry taking off (Image © Boeing)
Although its involvement has not been officially confirmed, it is very likely that the Saudis use their E-3 Sentries to provide a complete radar picture of the operations zone in Yemen (Image © Boeing)

Conflict
The conflict in Yemen is between loyalist forces that support fled president Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi and the Houthi / Zaidi Shia rebels. Main focus is the western part of the country. There the loyalist forces have the most support in the Sunnis south – with Aden as the principal city. Whoever control Aden, controls the sea lanes to/from the Red Sea – a main supply route for oil and other goods. The Arab coalition led by Saudi Arabia is said to be pushing towards Aden with a ground force of about 5,000 troops.

The Houthi forces have a strong control of the northern part of the west, mainly north of the capital of Sanaa. They easily took control of the capital last September and are known to be an effective fighting force, meaning the Arab coalition will very likely deploy combat aircraft and maybe helicopters in the close air-support role. In fact, the Saudis deployed armed helicopters (likely Apaches, but this is unconfirmed) on the border when its ground forces clased with Houthi forces.

Footage posted by AlAribya on YouTube

Iran
During a large part of the 20th century there were two Yemens. North Yemen became a state in 1918, while South Yemen freed itself from colonizer Britain. The two united on 22 May 1990, but unrest has plagued the country since 1993. In the current conflict Arab nations led by Saudi Arabia support the loyalist forces – including military ground and air ops since this week. Iran is opposing the use of weapons by its Arab neighbours, but has so far stayed out of the conflict militarily.

Houthi rebel combat planes
Officially at least, since some sources indicate that Islamic Republic of Iran Air Force pilots are flying combat planes of Yemeni Air Force units who sided or were overrun by Houthi rebels. One or more Iranian ships have also docket in Hudaidah with military equipment and ammunition on board earlier this March.

But with the Royal Saudi Air Force controlling Yemeni air space since Thursday 26 March, it is unlikely that Houthi planes with Yemeni or Iranian pilots will stand much of a change. In fact, according to several sources on 30 March 2015 the Saudi-led air strikes have destroyed at least 11 fighter jets of the Houthi rebels. The rebels got quite a prize in the third week of March, capturing Yemeni Air Force Al Anad Airbase with apparently up to 21 Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-29 Fulcrum fighter jets. Some sources say that the Houthis never had more than 16 combat aircraft in total, so the exact details are somewhat sketchy.

© 2015 Airheadsfly.com editor Marcel Burger
Featured image (top): A UAE F-16 (Image © Michael B. Keller / USAF)

Related: Saudis use Typhoon and F-15 in Yemen strike

A Jordan F-16, bought from surplus Belgium inventory. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
A Jordan F-16, bought from surplus Belgium inventory. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

Swiss Tigers show their age

Swiss Air Force F-5E Tigers should see the end of their careers in 2016, but now the Swiss see themselves confronted with a major repair job on their remaining F-5s. Crack were found in structural parts on two aircraft, forcing a restriction on flying. The first Northrop F-5s came into Swiss service in 1976.

Update 18 January 2015: several Patrouille Suisse F-5E Tigers were seen flying today during a fly pass over the Ski World Cup in Wengen, Switzerland. Two of the aircraft taking part were in standard grey colours however, so presumably two Patrouille Suisse aircraft grounded for inspection. See pic below

A number of aircraft has already been inspected, but 13 aircraft remain unchecked and therefore grounded. Each inspection takes two weeks, and all repair work is expected to be concluded in Q2 of 2015. Eighteen F-5E single-seaters and a number of F-5F two-seaters will not be inspected, as they are not in use anymore.

The Swiss Air Force says all tasks – including air patrol missions  during the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos – will be performed by Boeing F/A-18 Hornets. The cracks in the Tigers however do mean that the Swiss air demonstration team Patrouille Suisse is temporarily unable to perform. The team uses six F-5E Tigers.

© 2015 Airheadsfly.com editor Elmer van Hest

Grease it in! Or in this case, just smoke it in! (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Grease it in! Or in this case, just smoke it in! (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Every year in October, Axalp is the place to be in Switzerland. The Swiss Air Force then combines a live firing exercise with an airshow, and all of this literally on an Alp. The scenery is breathtaking, the action is also - F-5 Tigers included. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Every year in October, Axalp is the place to be in Switzerland. The Swiss Air Force then combines a live firing exercise with an airshow, and all of this literally on an Alp. The scenery is breathtaking, the action also is – F-5 Tigers included. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

Selamat tinggal Malaysian F-5

We say Goodbye (or selamat tingal in Malay) to the Royal Malaysian Air Force (RMAF) F-5E Tiger and RF-5E Tigereye. With the 2015 budget coming into effect soon, the Northrop fighter-bombers from the Cold War era will be retired.

The parliament in Kuala Lumpur was informed of the decision on 18 November this year, when Deputy Defence Minister Datuk Abdul Rahim Bakri also told the MPs the 10 MiG-29N and 2 MiG-29NUB will be decommissioned in 2015.

There is no immediate replacement for the (to be) retired jets yet, meaning the RMAF has to soldier on with its 18 Sukhoi Su-30MKMs and 8 McDonnell Douglas (Boeing) F/A-18Ds, plus the light attack British Aerospace Hawk 208s (13) and Italian-made Aermacchi MB 339s (18).

F-5s have been flying in Malaysia airspace ever since the establishment of 12 Squadron in 1975, that became the country’s first fast jet air defence unit. They were already retired once in 2000, but called back into service in 2003 at Butterworth RMAF Base as the Tactical Air Reconnaissance Squadron and Reserve.

Despite the second retirement renewed strategic-military tensions in Asia might give the Tigers another chance. We at Airheadsfly.com are already carefully practicing our next phrase in Malay: Jumpa lagi F Lima or See you again F-5!

© 2014 Airheadsfly.com editor Marcel Burger

See our extensive Overview: Air Forces of Malaysia

According to the Malaysian Ministry of Defence all F-5Es and RF-5Es will be retired in December 2014 (Image © National Museum of the US Air Force)
A Royal Malaysian Air Force RF-5 (Image © National Museum of the US Air Force)