Tag Archives: C-130

Press Play: Cold Response 2016 (2)

We already served you a nice dish of images of the big NATO & partners exercise Cold Response earlier, but the military photographers and the Norwegian military audiovisual unit have given us some more nice stuff! Press play and see more of the aircraft and helicopters that supported the 15,000 troops strong exercise in Northern and Central Norway, with even the Norwegian crown prince Haakon deployed, earning his tactical special operations parajump certification with the Norwegian Special Operations Command.

Featured image (top): US Marines, Dutch marines and UK Royal Commandos do an integrated air insert during a training event for Exercise Cold Response 16 on 3 March 2016 near the city of Namsos, Norway. (Image © Chad McMeen / USMC)


Norwegian Crownprince Haakon Magnus jumps with the Norwegian Special Operations Command (NORASOC) from a Royal Norwegian Air Force C-130J Hercules (Image © Forsvaret)
Norwegian Crownprince Haakon Magnus jumps with the Norwegian Special Operations Command (NORASOC) from a Royal Norwegian Air Force C-130J Hercules (Image © Forsvaret)

And off the Norwegian Crownprince goes (Image © Forsvaret)
And off the Norwegian Crownprince goes (Image © Forsvaret)
To get his tactical special operations jump certificate the Norwegian Crownprince Haakon also left a RNoAF Bell 412 in mid-air (Image © Forsvaret)
To get his tactical special operations jump certificate the Norwegian Crownprince Haakon also left a RNoAF Bell 412 in mid-air (Image © Forsvaret)
A RNoAF Bell 412 goes for a white-out landing during Cold Response 2016 (Image © Sofia Carlsson / Forsvaret)
A RNoAF Bell 412 goes for a white-out landing during Cold Response 2016 (Image © Sofia Carlsson / Forsvaret)
A Polish Kaman SH-2G Super Seasprite practising together with the Norwegian frigate KNM Thor Heyerdahl in Trøndelag during Cold Response 2016 (Image © Mats Hjelmeland / Sjøforsvaret)
A Polish Kaman SH-2G Super Seasprite practising together with the Norwegian frigate KNM Thor Heyerdahl in Trøndelag during Cold Response 2016 (Image © Mats Hjelmeland / Sjøforsvaret)

A Swedish Armed Forces NH90 - called HKP 14 in Swedish military service - in action during Cold Response 2016 (Image © Mats Carlsson / Försvarsmakten)
A Swedish Armed Forces NH90 – called HKP 14 in Swedish military service – in action during Cold Response 2016 (Image © Mats Carlsson / Försvarsmakten)

U.S Marines Cobra i övningsområdet. Foto: Jesper Sundström/Försvarsmakten #coldresponse2016 #coldresponse #svfm #usmarines #helicopter

A photo posted by I19 Norrbottens Regemente (@i19norrbottensregemente) on

A B-52 Stratofortress from Barksdale AFB receives fuel from a KC-135 Stratotanker assigned to RAF Mildenhall, England, over the Trøndelag region of Norway, while participating in exercise Cold Response 2016 (Image © Senior Airman Victoria H. Taylor / USAF)
A B-52 Stratofortress from Barksdale AFB receives fuel from a KC-135 Stratotanker assigned to RAF Mildenhall, England, over the Trøndelag region of Norway, while participating in exercise Cold Response 2016 (Image © Senior Airman Victoria H. Taylor / USAF)

Getting tough during Real Thaw 2016

From 21 February to 4 March, Portugal was the stage of Real Thaw, the annual exercise that provides special training to NATO units most likely to participate in military operations within international cooperative frame works. And if Portugal was the stage, Beja airbase was the dressing room. Fighter aircraft, transporters and helos all played their part.

Other than delivering jet noise over large parts of Portugal, the main goal of Real Thaw 2016 was to provide tough tactical training with participation of air, land  and sea forces and focusing on the execution phase. Participating forces were confronted with an operating environment as realistic as possible and typical of current operations, according to the Portuguese Air Force, organizer of Real Thaw.

(Image © Jorge Ruivo)
(Image © Jorge Ruivo)
(Image © Jorge Ruivo)
Many transport aircraft were involved in Real Thaw… (Image © Jorge Ruivo)
(Image © Jorge Ruivo)
…. as were plenty of fighter jets. (Image © Jorge Ruivo)
(Image © Jorge Ruivo)
An F-16 cleans up the gear. (Image © Jorge Ruivo)

Assets

The Portuguese sent all their assets to join Real Thaw, including F-16s, Alfa Jets, C-130 Hercules plus P-3 and C295 maritime patrol aircraft. Forces from other countries were invited to participate in Real Thaw 2016 in order to create a joint-operational environment.

Participation also came from the US (F-15, MV-22 and C-130), Norway (F-16), the Netherlands (C-130), Belgium (C-130), Denmark (AS550 support helicopters), Spain (C-212 light transport aircraft) and the UK. Also, a NATO E-3A Awacs was involved.

(Image © Jorge Ruivo)
Back on terra firma after a mission. (Image © Jorge Ruivo)
(Image © Jorge Ruivo)
The US Air Force brought a two seater F-15D to Beja. (Image © Jorge Ruivo)
(Image © Jorge Ruivo)
Portuguese Alfa Jets are known to wear attractive paint jobs. (Image © Jorge Ruivo)
(Image © Jorge Ruivo)
Taking part also were two MV-22 Ospreys. (Image © Jorge Ruivo)

Day and night

Missions took place at both day and night times environments and included the use of para jumpers, forward air controllers and other ground forces. The coordination of Real Thaw 2016 was run from Beja Air Base in central Portugal. In order to give support to air and ground missions that took place further north in the areas of Guarda and Pinhel,  a tactical air base was temporarily set up near the town of Seia.

Real Thaw 2016 was the eighth exercise in a series conducted by the Portuguese Air Force since 2009.

© 2016 Airheadsfly.com contributor Jorge Ruivo – www.cannontwo.blogspot.pt
Featured image (top): An F-16 thunders away from Beja. (Image © Jorge Ruivo)

(Image © Jorge Ruivo)
The maritime element in Real Thaw 2016: a P-3 Orion. (Image © Jorge Ruivo)
(Image © Jorge Ruivo)
Two Alfa Jets approach Beja in formation. (Image © Jorge Ruivo)
(Image © Jorge Ruivo)
Eagle at dusk. (Image © Jorge Ruivo)

Feature: C-130 Hercules beats 2,500

The Lockheed Martin C-130 Hercules has reached a new milestone. On 11 December 2015 the 2,500th aircraft of the type was delivered: a HC-130J Combat King II to the US Air Force’s 71st Rescue Squadron at Moody Air Force Base in Georgia.

With reaching the number the US aircraft manufacturer illustrates once again the important role of the most popular military transport aircraft of modern times. The C-130 easily beats the Antonov AN-26 (1,400 produced), the AN-24 (1,300 – 1,400) and the AN-12 (1,200+ produced), of which only the AN-12 is somewhat similar as a four-engine turboprop tactical airlifter. The Hercules has been flying into many battles, providing troops with necessary provisions and ammunition. But it also brought thousands of tons of food and medical supplies to people in need and rescuing many from disaster zones.

Loadmaster Senior Airman Kevin O’Neil, 71st Rescue Squadron, waits for engine start-up of Herc 13-782 on 11 December 2015 at the Lockheed Martin C-130 Ramp in Marietta, Georgia (Image © Senior Airman Ryan Callaghan / US Air Force)
Loadmaster Senior Airman Kevin O’Neil, 71st Rescue Squadron, waits for engine start-up of Herc 13-782 on 11 December 2015 at the Lockheed Martin C-130 Ramp in Marietta, Georgia (Image © Senior Airman Ryan Callaghan / US Air Force)
Captain Andrew Kim, 71st Rescue Squadron pilot, flies the 2,500 Hercules, a HC-130J Combat King II on 11 December 2015 in the skies over southern Georgia. (Image © Senior Airman Ryan Callaghan / US Air Force)
Captain Andrew Kim, 71st Rescue Squadron pilot, flies the 2,500 Hercules, a HC-130J Combat King II on 11 December 2015 in the skies over southern Georgia. (Image © Senior Airman Ryan Callaghan / US Air Force)
The 2,500th Hercules, the seventh HC-130J Combat King II of the USAF's 71st Rescue Squadron conducts a low pass before landing on 11 December 2015 at Moody AFB (Image © Senior Airman Ceaira Tinsley / US Air Force)
The 2,500th Hercules, the seventh HC-130J Combat King II of the USAF’s 71st Rescue Squadron conducts a low pass before landing on 11 December 2015 at Moody AFB (Image © Senior Airman Ceaira Tinsley / US Air Force)
The 2,500 Hercules delivered taxis to the parking area of Moody AFB after landing on 11 December 2015 (Image © Senior Airman Ceaira Tinsley / US Air Force)
The 2,500 Hercules delivered taxis to the parking area of Moody AFB after landing on 11 December 2015 (Image © Senior Airman Ceaira Tinsley / US Air Force)

Today at least 68 countries operate the C-130 in its military role, logging more than 22 million flight hours, according to statistics from Lockheed Martin. There are even a few civilian operators like Lynden Air Cargo from the United States and Safair from South Africa. Sixteen nations choose to newest model, the C-130J Super Hercules, for their nation’s air arms. More than 100 different variants of the C-130 have been made.

C-130 First Flight

The characteristic sound of the Herc’s four Allison T56 engines have been with us ever since 23 August 1954, when prototype YC-130 took off from the Lockheed plant in Burbank, California, to land at Edwards Air Force Base roughly an hour later. Since then the C-130 has been developed into not only a tactical airlifter, but flying weather stations, air tanker, airborne gunship, reconnaissance aircraft and (combat) rescue machine.

Adore the Hercules

Let’s give a big applause to the men and women who designed, made, fly, service or just adore the Lockheed Martin C-130 Hercules … wherever they are with some historic Hercules images (below).

© 2015 Airheadsfly.com editor Marcel Burger
Featured image (top): Airman 1st Class Jonathan Marquez, 71st Rescue Squadron crew chief, marshals in the HC-130J Combat King II on 11 December 2015 at Moody AFB (Image © Senior Airman Ceaira Tinsley / US Air Force)

Belgian Air Component Lockheed C-130H Hercules of the 20 Smaldeel performing a fly-by of Kleine Brogel Airbase during the 2001 Tiger Meet. (Image © Marcel Burger)
Belgian Air Component Lockheed C-130H Hercules of the 20 Smaldeel performing a fly-by of Kleine Brogel Airbase during the 2001 Tiger Meet. (Image © Marcel Burger)
A pair of American C-130Hs and crew on Eindhoven Airbase, the Netherlands in September 2014 (Image © Dennis Spronk)
A pair of American C-130Hs and crew on Eindhoven Airbase, the Netherlands in September 2014 (Image © Dennis Spronk)
The humidity of the air is clearly visible in this picture, nice special effect on this French Air Force C-130. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
The humidity of the air is clearly visible in this picture, nice special effect on this French Air Force C-130. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
A view from the top of a Austrian C-130 Hercules.(Image © Elmer van Hest)
A view from the top of a Austrian C-130 Hercules.(Image © Elmer van Hest)
A Bangladesh Air Force C-130E landing at Zia International Airport near Dhaka (Image (CC) Faisal Akra)
A Bangladesh Air Force C-130E landing at Zia International Airport near Dhaka (Image (CC) Faisal Akra)
A Royal Australian Air Force C-130 Hercules in mid-air (Image © Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
A Royal Australian Air Force C-130 Hercules in mid-air (Image © Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
Lockheed C-130H-30 Hercules tactical transport aircraft of the Royal Netherlands Air Force at the Royal Netherlands Air Force Airshow in 2004, Volkel AB. Aircraft G-275 seen here in the original camouflage livery of the early years of its service life with the RNLAF (Image © Marcel Burger)
Lockheed C-130H-30 Hercules tactical transport aircraft of the Royal Netherlands Air Force at the Royal Netherlands Air Force Airshow in 2004, Volkel AB. Aircraft G-275 seen here in the original camouflage livery of the early years of its service life with the RNLAF (Image © Marcel Burger)
Lockheed Tp 84 Herkules (C-130H Hercules) of the Swedish Air Force (Flygvapnet) taxiing to the runway while the Swiss Air Force (Schweizer Luftwaffe) PC-7 Team breaks above Linköping-Malmen in 2012. (Image © Marcel Burger)
Lockheed Tp 84 Herkules (C-130H Hercules) of the Swedish Air Force (Flygvapnet) taxiing to the runway while the Swiss Air Force (Schweizer Luftwaffe) PC-7 Team breaks above Linköping-Malmen in 2012. (Image © Marcel Burger)
Lynden Air Cargo Lockheed L100-30 landing at Ramstein Airbase, Germany in 2004 (Image © Marcel Burger)
Lynden Air Cargo Lockheed L100-30 landing at Ramstein Airbase, Germany in 2004 (Image © Marcel Burger)
British paratroopers leaving a RAF Lockheed Hercules above Ginkel Heath, the Netherlands, during the World War 2 Operation Market Garden Commemorative flight in 2003 (Image © Marcel Burger)
British paratroopers leaving a RAF Lockheed Hercules above Ginkel Heath, the Netherlands, during the World War 2 Operation Market Garden Commemorative flight in 2003 (Image © Marcel Burger)
Lockheed C-130 of the Brazilian Air Force at the 2007 RIAT airshow at RAF Fairford (Image © Marcel Burger)
Lockheed C-130 of the Brazilian Air Force at the 2007 RIAT airshow at RAF Fairford (Image © Marcel Burger)
Two CC-130 Hercules aircraft refuel in Resolute Bay, Nunavut, during Operation Nunalivut 2013 (Image © Corporal Pierre Letourneau / DND-MDN Canada)
Two CC-130 Hercules aircraft refuel in Resolute Bay, Nunavut, during Operation Nunalivut 2013 (Image © Corporal Pierre Letourneau / DND-MDN Canada)
The first ever landing of an Argentine Hercules, a C-130E, on Marambio Base permafrost in the Antarctics on 11 April 1970. Earlier attempts on four other days in that month were aborted due to bad weather. The aircraft with registration TC-61 was from 1 Air Brigade, flying in from Río Gallegos, transporting military personnel and 3,500 kilograms of food plus mail. (Image © Fuerza Aérea Argentina)
The first ever landing of an Argentine Hercules, a C-130E, on Marambio Base permafrost in the Antarctics on 11 April 1970. Earlier attempts on four other days in that month were aborted due to bad weather. The aircraft with registration TC-61 was from 1 Air Brigade, flying in from Río Gallegos, transporting military personnel and 3,500 kilograms of food plus mail. (Image © Fuerza Aérea Argentina)
An Afghan Air Force pilot flies a AAF C-130 Hercules during an "advisory mission" with US Air Force airmen from 438th Air Expeditionary Wing/NATO Air Training Command-Afghanistan 10 March 2014, over Kabul (Image © Tech. Sgt. Jason Robertson / US Air Force)
An Afghan Air Force pilot flies a AAF C-130 Hercules during an “advisory mission” with US Air Force airmen from 438th Air Expeditionary Wing/NATO Air Training Command-Afghanistan 10 March 2014, over Kabul (Image © Tech. Sgt. Jason Robertson / US Air Force)
Flightdeck of the Lockheed C-130J Super Hercules. Here a combined US/Canadian crew at work on the runway of Bagram Airbase, Afghanistan (Image © Staff Sgt. Manuel J. Martinez/USAF)
Flightdeck of the Lockheed C-130J Super Hercules. Here a combined US/Canadian crew at work on the runway of Bagram Airbase, Afghanistan (Image © Staff Sgt. Manuel J. Martinez/USAF)
4x6 size An Austrian Air Force Lockheed C-130K Hercules in flight (Image © Österreichische Luftstreitkräfte)
4×6 size An Austrian Air Force Lockheed C-130K Hercules in flight (Image © Österreichische Luftstreitkräfte)
A RoCAF (Taiwanese) C-130H Hercules landing at Chih Hang AFB in 2013 (Image (CC) Xuán Shǐshēng)
A RoCAF (Taiwanese) C-130H Hercules landing at Chih Hang AFB in 2013 (Image (CC) Xuán Shǐshēng)
A CC-130 Hercules takes off into the sunset during Operation Impact on 21 February 2015. (Image © OP Impact, DND)
A CC-130 Hercules takes off into the sunset during Operation Impact on 21 February 2015. (Image © OP Impact, DND)

Uruguayan Hercules on Antarctic mission

If the weather will allow it the Uruguayan Air Force Lockheed C-130 Hercules dispatched to Antarctica will arrive home on Tuesday 8 December 2015.

The aircraft (FAU 592) left Air Brigade I (Carrasco) on 1 December, the Fuerza Aérea Uruguaya writes in a statement, with the personnel that will operate the Latin American country’s South Pole base in 2016. Dubbed Antarctic Scientific Antarkos XXXII the Hercules the technicians and other personnel will first focus on executing essential repairs to the base, mainly the generators and telecom systems, after the past winter period.

King George Island

Uruguay runs its Artigas Base at King George Island, 75 miles (120 km) from the main coast of Antarctica and home to research stations of many countries. The Uruguayan station is a 5 mile (10km) drive from a nearby 4,230 feet short airstrip which also serves other stations.

© 2015 Airheadsfly.com editor Marcel Burger
Featured image: The Uruguayan Air Force C-130 on an Antarctic mission (Image © Fuerza Aérea Uruguaya)

First Eurofighter air-to-air refueling with KC-130J Hercules

In August, the first air-to-air refueling fights between Spanish Air Force Eurofighters and United States Marine Corps (USMC) KC-130J Hercules aircraft took place in Spain.

The Eurofighters were from Esc 111 (squadron), part of Ala 11 (11th Wing) based at Morón Air Base in Southern Spain. The ops with the tanker were part getting to the squadron’s evaluation of the operational capabilities in October. The USMC Hercules tankers are already at Morón as part of the Special-Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force Crisis Response-Africa.

The Spanish Air Force is planning more tanker meetings with other units and aircraft, to increase the interoperability of its and allied armies.

Source: Ejército del Aire
Featured image: A Spanish Eurofighter C.16 in its usual habitat (Image © Ejército del Aire)

3-ship formation of Spanish air force Eurofighters behind a USMC KC-130J (Image © Ejército del Aire)
3-ship formation of Spanish air force Eurofighters behind a USMC KC-130J (Image © Ejército del Aire)
A single seat Spanish air force Eurofighter gets ready for the next contact (Image © Ejército del Aire)
A single seat Spanish air force Eurofighter gets ready for the next contact (Image © Ejército del Aire)
Air-to-air refueling above typical Spanish landscape (Image © Ejército del Aire)
Air-to-air refueling above typical Spanish landscape (Image © Ejército del Aire)