Tag Archives: Australian Defence Force

First Aussie PC-21 flies

Pilatus Aircraft has successfully tested the first of 49 PC-21 trainer aircraft destined for the Australian Defence Force, the company said on Thursday 21 July. The initial production test flight over the Pilatus factory in Stans, Switzerland, came only seven months after contract signature.

Under a contract signed in December 2015 aimed at harmonising Australian Defence Force flight training across all three services – Army, Navy and Air Force – Pilatus will deliver a total of 49 PC-21 which will operate from four Royal Australian Air Force bases. Pilatus will also supply significant elements of ground based training equipment and the in-service support capability.

This first PC-21 will be handed over to the Royal Australian Air Force at East Sale in June 2017 after completion of testing and verification work in both Switzerland and Australia.

The PC-21 aircraft will replace both the aging PC-9 fleet, which has been in service since 1988, and also the CT-4 aircraft currently used for basic training. The PC-9 is due to be withdrawn in 2019 after thirty years of service and more than 500,000 flying hours.

The PC-21s for Australia will form the backbone of future pilot training for the Australian Defence Force for the next 25 years.

Australian PC-21 deal signed

Australia on Tuesday 8 December finally signed the deal for the delivery of 49 Pilatus PC-21 turboprop trainers as part of a pilot training program contract awarded to Lockheed Martin. The PC-21 was selected as the aircaft of choice earlier in 2015.

Australia is no stranger to the PC-21, as the training platform has been in service with the Republic of Singapore Air Force at RAAF Base Pearce in Western Australia since 2008. The PC-21 is also operated by the air forces of Switzerland, the UAE, Saudi-Arabia and Qatar.  With this latest order 180 aircraft have been sold.

The PC-21 replaces the PC-9 in Australian service, which was introduced Down Under in 1987. Pilot training in the aircraft commenced in 1989. All were built under license by Hawker de Havilland in Sydney.

Deliveries

The PC-21’s for Australia will be delivered commencing June 2017 and will form the backbone of pilot training for the Australian Defence Force (ADF) for the next 25 years.

© 2015 Airheadsfly.com editor Elmer van Hest

Aussie helo training system one step closer

Airbus Helicopters has achieved what it calls ‘factory acceptance ‘of HATS01, the first of fifteen helicopters of the H135 family (formerly EC135 T2+) for the Helicopter Aircrew Training System (HATS) for the Australian Defence Force (ADF). Prime contractor is Boeing Defence Australia. Representatives of the Royal Australian Navy and the Australian Army joined the acceptance ceremony in Donauwörth, Germany.
 
Under the HATS project, a new joint helicopter training system for both Army and Navy aircrew will utilise the EC135 T2+ helicopters, along with flight simulators and a new flight-deck equipped sea-going training vessel.

Following contract signature in November of 2014, the first aircraft took to the skies on the 16th of January 2015, and is now accepted by the customer.  The next steps involve training of initial Boeing and Commonwealth aircrews and technicians in Donauwörth, before shipment to Australia in January 2016

 Source: Airbus Helicopters
Featured image (top): The first H135 for the Australian Defence Force. (Image © Airbus Helicopters)

Australia: hands on HATS helo

Australia will soon get its first EC135 T2+ helicopter for the Australian Defence Force (ADF). The helo successfully performed a 57 minute first flight recently, Airbus Helicopters reported on Monday 26 January. The chopper is part of a planned fleet of modern, twin-engine, rotary-wing aircraft being acquired for the new Helicopter Aircrew Training System (HATS) in Australia.

Under the HATS project, a joint training scheme for both Army and Navy aircrew will utilise some 15 Airbus Helicopters EC135 T2+ trainers, along with EC135 flight simulators and a new flight-deck equipped, sea-going training vessel.

The first aircraft was test flown from the Airbus Helicopters’ production site in Donauwörth, Germany. While the EC135 T2+ is a civil design helicopter, it has also proved to be a ideal military trainer. With a high-visibility glass cockpit, multi-axis auto-pilot and the performance and safety of a twin-engine helicopter replacing current single-engine types, it is similar to the multi-role and combat helicopters now in service Down Under- including new-generation Tigers and NH90s.

Initial Operating Capability (IOC) is scheduled for late 2018 although students will begin arriving earlier. The HATS system will eventually accommodate up to 130 students a year.

Source: Airbus Helicopters

(Image ©Airbus Helicopters)
(Image ©Airbus Helicopters)

Meet the future Australian aircraft carrier

UPDATED 28 November 2014 | Officially commissioned on 28 November 2014, it is the largest ship ever built for the Australian Defence Force (ADF) and it is sporting an interesting ski-jump. Will we see Harriers or F-35B Lightning IIs operate from the brand new HMAS Canberra?

Likely, but not flying in Royal Australian Navy (RAN) or Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) service … for the time being. The official roles of the new ADF Landing Helicopter Dock ships include “to embark, transport and deploy a military force. In case of the ADF it will be the Army, but it could equally be an allied Army or Marines Corps”.

Hello US Marines and British Royal Navy/Royal Marines F-35s! The short take-off and vertical landing fighter jets ordered by the two services would make excellent fighter coverage for any naval combat force with the HMAS Canberra or its future sister ship HMAS Adelaide as its centrepiece. Or it might host other navy’s Harrier jump jets, like the EAV-8B Matador IIs of 9a Escuadrilla Aeronaves that can deploy on the SPS L61 Juan Carlos I. The Australian Canberra-class LHDs are based on this Spanish design.

But things are looking good for a RAAF/RAN F-35 force on board the HMAS Canberra. “The Government is considering buying the “B” model of the F-35, the variant to operate from aircraft carriers”, Australian Defence Minister David Johnston more or less told the newspaper The Weekend West in the beginning of May 2014. Other sources confirmed the stealthy Lightning II has been considered for the two new LHDs from the very first day the Australian government ordered the vessels.

The first of two new Landing Helicopter Dock ships being built for the Australian Defence Force, entered Sydney Harbour for the first time on 13 March 2014 as part of her first contractor trials and testing program at sea. Canberra departed the BAE Systems dockyard at Williamstown on 3 March and conducted a series of tests to prove systems and equipment prior to the Contractor delivery of the ship to Defence. The trials tested a variety of systems in different conditions. The ship is scheduled to undertake a commercial docking in the Dry Dock in Sydney, where the size and scale of the LHD platform will be readily apparent. Canberra is scheduled to receive a hull clean in the dock and final paint before proceeding to sea and returning to Williamstown to commence the final phase of Contractor sea trials involving communications and combat systems. Both LHDs will be home-ported at Fleet Base East, Sydney (Image © ABIS Bonny Gassner / Navy Imagery Unit - East / Commonwealth of Australia)
The first of two new Landing Helicopter Dock ships being built for the Australian Defence Force, entered Sydney Harbour for the first time on 13 March 2014 as part of her first contractor trials and testing program at sea. Canberra departed the BAE Systems dockyard at Williamstown on 3 March and conducted a series of tests to prove systems and equipment prior to the Contractor delivery of the ship to Defence. The trials tested a variety of systems in different conditions. The ship is scheduled to undertake a commercial docking in the Dry Dock in Sydney, where the size and scale of the LHD platform will be readily apparent. Canberra is scheduled to receive a hull clean in the dock and final paint before proceeding to sea and returning to Williamstown to commence the final phase of Contractor sea trials involving communications and combat systems. Both LHDs will be home-ported at Fleet Base East, Sydney
(Image © ABIS Bonny Gassner / Navy Imagery Unit – East / Commonwealth of Australia)

Rotary wing fleet
The Canberra’s flight deck is 202.3 m (663 feet) long and 32 m (105 feet) wide with six landing spots, primarily designed to accommodate the ADF’s rotary wing fleet. It allows simultaneous take off and landing operations of six medium-sized helicopters like the MRH90 Taipan, S-70B-2 Black Hawk, the new MH-60R Seahawk, or four simultaneous take off and landings of the larger CH-47D/F Chinooks in Royal Australian Army service. There are two aircraft elevators – one aft of the flight deck and one forward of the island on the starboard side – that can accommodate medium sized helicopters, with the after one able to accommodate the larger Chinooks.

Computer generated cut-out of helicopters boarded on the HMAS Canberra (Image © Commonwealth of Australia)
Computer generated cut-out of helicopters boarded on the HMAS Canberra (Image © Commonwealth of Australia)

Hangar
Between the flight deck and the accommodation deck is a contiguous hangar and light vehicle deck. The hanger (aft) can accommodate up to 8 medium sized helicopters with 18 medium sized helicopters able to be accommodated if the light vehicle deck (front) is also used. Accommodation is provided for 1400 personnel, of which 400 are the ship’s own company. The LHD will be jointly crewed with personnel from Navy, Army and the Air Force.

Combat power
Untill (foreign) Harriers or F-35s are admitted during operations, the biggest aerial combat power on the Canberra and Adelaide will come from embarked ARH-Tiger armed reconnaissance helicopter, of which 22 operate with the RAA’s 1st Aviation Regiment in Darwin. Getting the two LHDs out at sea has put Australia back in a more strategic maritime role, after the last aircraft carrier of the nation – HMAS Melbourne – was decommissioned in 1982.

© 2014 AIRheads’ editor Marcel Burger with source information of the Royal Australian Navy

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