Category Archives: Trainers

Indian Navy received first Hawk Mk 132

A BAe Systems Hawk in Indian armed forces livery (Image © BAE Systems)
A BAe Systems Hawk in Indian armed forces livery (Image © BAE Systems)

The Indian Navy received its first of 17 ordered BAE Systems Hawk Mk 132 on September 23, 2013. Therby India has become the third naval operator of the advanced training aircraft, after the Fleet Air Arm of the British Royal Navy and the US Navy with its own derivative McDonnell Douglas (Boeing) T-45 Goshawk. The Indian Air Force also has 40 of the new Hawks on order with the British manufacturer. The Indian Hawks are assembled in India by Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL).

Source: BAE Systems

Goodbye to South Korean Hawks & Talons

The Republic of Korea Air Force (ROKAF) is saying good bye to its Hawk Mk67s. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The Republic of Korea Air Force (ROKAF) is saying goodbye to its Hawk Mk67s. The aircraft above is one of ten now registered in the US. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

The Republic of Korea Air Force (ROKAF) is getting rid of its twenty year old British Aerospace Hawk Mk67 aircraft, as ten of them showed up on the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) register last week. The aircraft are reportedly owned by AirUSA in Nevada. The ROKAF is replacing these Hawks with indigenous developed and built T-50 Golden Hawk aircraft. AIRheads↑FLY visited South Korea years ago, the faboulous dish of kimchi being our main target. Oh, and we saw some of those Hawks as well.

The ROKAF Hawk were based at Yecheon airbase in central South Korea. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The ROKAF Hawk were stationed at Yecheon airbase in central South Korea. Deliveries began in 1993. This aircraft is caught landing at its homebase in autumn 2004. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The camouflage on these aircraft was as striking as the dayglow parts. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The camouflage on these aircraft was as striking as the orange dayglow parts. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

Talon
Not only did the Koreans say goodbye to the Hawks, they did the very same to the thirty Northrop T-38A Talons that were leased from the US. In South Korea, these trainers also used Yecheon as their homebase. Over the last few years, the Talons returned stateside, where they returned flying in USAF service. Most of them are now operating from Holloman AFB, NM.

The dayglow was also found on the T-38A Talons in South Korea. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The orange dayglow was also found on the T-38A Talons in South Korea. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The Hawks and T-38 shared the runway at Yecheon airbase. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The Hawks and T-38 shared the runway at Yecheon airbase. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
T-38s are gone from South Korean skies, but continue training pilots in many countries. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
T-38s are gone from South Korean skies, but continue to train pilots in many countries. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

And what replaces both the Hawks and Talons is the Korea Aircraft Industries (KAI) T-50; a state of the art two-seater that is capable of supersonic speeds. The T-50 is flying in substantial numbers in South Korea now, and recently the first aircraft were delivered to Indonesia.

Seen landing at Sacheon is the second KAI T-50 prototype. The installation over the exhaust houses an anti spin dragchute. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
This is the second KAI T-50 prototype, seen in October 2004. (Image © Dennis Spronk)

 

© 2013 AIRheads’ Elmer van Hest

Check out the RoKAF Orbat at Scramble.nl

First T-50 Golden Hawks land in Indonesia

Nice colours on the Indonesian T-50s! (Image © TNI-AU)
Nice colours on the Indonesian T-50s! (Image © TNI-AU)

The first two T-50 Golden Hawks for the Indonesian air force (TNI-AU) arrived in Indonesia today, two years after an agreement for 16 aircraft was signed with Korea Aerospace Industries (KAI). The aircraft left for Indonesia after leaving Seochan airfield, home of KAI and birthplace of the T-50 Golden Hawk.

The contract for 16 T-50i aircraft – as the Indonesian version of the Golden Hawk is officially designated – is worth 400 million USD. The supersonic trainers are to replace the BAe Hawk Mk53s that are now in service with the TNI-AU.

The ferry flight from South Korea to Indonesia took about seven hours to complete. Click here for an air to air shot of the T-50s escorted by a Hawk. All 16 aircraft will be delivered during the coming months, in a total of eight ferry flights.

The South Korean T-50, that very much resembles a scaled down F-16, first flew in August 2002. The Republic of South Korea Air Force (ROKAF) operates a substantial nuber of T-50s. The type is also used by ROKAFs display team, the Black Eagles.

Other countries have expressed interest in the Golden Hawk. Among those countries is the Philippines.

Seen landing at Sacheon is the second KAI T-50 prototype. The installation over the exhaust houses an anti spin dragchute. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Seen landing at Sacheon is the second KAI T-50 prototype. The installation on top of the exhaust houses an anti spin dragchute. (Image © Dennis Spronk)

© 2013 AIRheads’ Elmer van Hest

Check out the Indonesian Air Force Orbat at Scramble.nl

Nice trainer, great helmet

Dedicated followers of the latest HMD-fashion. (Image © Alenia Aermacchi)
Dedicated followers of the latest HMD-fashion. (Image © Alenia Aermacchi)

Alenia Aermachhi sure is proud of its new M-346, and called it ‘the only advanced jet trainer with a fully integrated Helmet Mounted Display (HMD)’ in a press release on Tuesday. The new helmet provides student pilots with a new generation personal avionics system that enables them to develop competency in the use of advanced weapons systems management in operations fully representative of modern combat aircraft.

Fully integrated into the M-346 aircraft avionics systems and the ground based mission simulators, the HMD is particularly effective in those missions where the trainee employs the Embedded Tactical Training System (ETTS) for sensor and weapons systems training.

In these missions the HMD demonstrates its outstanding capability to augment the pilot’s Situational Awareness (SA), both in Air-To-Air and Air-To-Ground missions.  Optically integrated with the M-346 Head-Up Display (HUD), the M-346 HMD provides training in the combined use of HMD and HUD provided information.

The M-346 HMD is particularly effective during off bore-sight “target tracking”; tactical symbology is displayed on the helmet visor and provides targeting and tracking information in direct view allowing the student to concentrate on performing tactical maneuvers and weapon release in pursuit of his mission objective. The M-346 HMD is also equipped with a click-on night module which permits an easy mechanical integration with all the most common night-vision goggle models.

Now, we at AIRheads↑FLY barely understand what any of the above means. But we do know it looks kind of cool as you can see as well at Alenia Aermacchi M-346 resumes flight tests.

© 2013 AIRheads’ Elmer van Hest

Alenia Aermacchi M-346 resumes flight tests

The Alenia Aermacchi advanced jet trainer over the desert (Image © Alenia Aermacchi)
The Alenia Aermacchi advanced jet trainer over the desert (Image © Alenia Aermacchi)

The M-346 advanced jet trainer has resumed test flight operations after it was grounded by Alenia Aermacchi of Italy following an accident of the company-owned, pre-series aircraft on May 11, 2013.

,,The technical investigation allowed Alenia Aermacchi to successfully identify the accident’s causes”, writes the company in a press release. ,,The process has been shared with air force customers, and the required aircraft modifications have been approved by the relevant authority, the Italian Direzione Armamenti Aeronautici.”

Source: Alenia Aermacchi