Category Archives: Intelligence

More Poseidon adventure

Rotate! A Boeing P-8 takes to the sky in Renton, WA. (Image © Boeing)
Rotate! A Boeing P-8 takes to the sky in Renton, WA. (Image © Boeing)

The US Navy awarded Boeing a $1.98 billion contract for 13 additional P-8A Poseidon aircraft, continuing the modernization of U.S. maritime patrol capabilities that will ultimately involve more than 100 P-8As. Boeing announced the deal on August 1, 2013.

The US Navy has now ordered 37 of the 117 P-8As it is expected to buy. To date, 10 have been delivered. Based on the Boeing Next-Generation 737-800 commercial airplane, the P-8 provides anti-submarine, anti-surface warfare as well as intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities. The P-8 is replacing the Navy’s P-3 aircraft.

Boeing assembles P-8As in the same facility where it builds all its 737s. The Poseidon team uses a first-in-industry in-line process that takes advantage of the efficiencies in the Next-Generation 737 production system. After initial assembly, the  P-8A aircraft enter a separate mission system installation and checkout facility for final modifications and testing.

Initial operational test and evaluation (IOT&E) was completed in March; the US Navy announced July 1 that the P-8A program had passed IOT&E and the P-8A was ready for fleet introduction.

Source: Boeing

Overview: the Air Forces of Denmark

Royal Danish Air Force (RDAF) (Flyvevåbnet) status as of July 2013


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Active number of aircraft: 93

  • 17x Lockheed Martin F-16AM single-seat multi-role fighter
  • 13x Lockheed Martin F-16BM dual-seat multi-role fighter
  • 4x Lockheed C-130J-30 Hercules tactical transport aircraft
  • 3x Canadair CL-604 Challenger sea and fishery patrol & VIP transport aircraft
  • 27x Saab T-17 (MFI-17) training and observer/scout aircraft
  • 14x Agusta Westland EH-101 tactical transport & search and rescue helicopter
  • 8x Eurocopter AS 550 C2 Fennec observation & scout helicopter
  • 7x Westland Lynx Mk 90B naval support helicopter

Airbases (Flyvestation): 5

  • Aalborg

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    • C-130 (Eskadrille 721)
    • CL-604 (Eskadrille 721)
    • EH-101 (SAR)
    • T-17 (Flyveskolen, 4x)
  • Karup

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    • T-17 (Flyveskolen, 20x)
    • EH-101 (Eskadrille 722)
    • Lynx Mk 90B (Eskadrille 723)
    • AS 550 Fennec (Eskadrille 724)
  • Skrydstrup

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    • F-16AM/BM (Eskadrille 727 / Eskadrille 730)
    • EH-101 (SAR)
    • T-17 (Flyveskolen, 3x)
  • Roskilde

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    • EH-101 (SAR)
    • Sea King Mk 43 (330 skvadron)
  • Sønderstrømfjord (Greenland)

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    • CL-604 (det. Esk 721, 1x)

Source: Flyvevåbnet

Upgraded Orion speeds to US Customs

The MLU P-3 Orion of US Customs and Border Protection lands at the agencies airfield of Greenville, South Caroline, July 2013. (Image © Lockheed Martin)
The MLU P-3 Orion of US Customs and Border Protection lands at the agencies airfield of Greenville, South Caroline, July 2013. (Image © Lockheed Martin)

US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) received its eight of 14 upgraded Lockheed P-3 Orion on July 18th, 78 days ahead of delivery schedule, from Lockheed Martin.

During the so-called Mid-Life Update (MLU) the manufacturer replaces all fatigue life-limiting structures with enhanced-design components; and incorporates a new metal alloy that is five times more corrosion resistant than the original material. This way the operating costs of the P-3 are reduced. The MLU solution removes current aircraft flight restrictions and extends the structural service life of the P-3 up to 15,000 hours, adding more than 20 years of operational use.

Worldwide the Lockheed P-3 Orion is extensively used for maritime patrol and reconnaissance, homeland security, hurricane reconnaissance, anti-piracy operations, humanitarian relief, search and rescue, intelligence gathering, and antisubmarine warfare.

During fiscal year 2012, the CBP P-3 fleet seized or disrupted more than 117,765 pounds of cocaine valued at more than $8.8 billion, totaling 21.1 pounds seized for every flight hour, valued at $1.5 million for every hour flown.

Source: Lockheed Martin