Category Archives: Airlift

Ukrainian legacy keeps small Russian wings airborne

Ignore Russia took control of the Crimean peninsula in 2014 for a few moments, ignore the ongoing fights in Ukraine’s eastern areas with Russian troop, intelligence and command & control involvement. The Russian military is still building its logistic strength on the legacy from the country it has been trying to destabilize for years. For its short-haul fixed-wing flights.

Designed and originally made by Antonov in Ukrainian Kiev, the new Antonov AN-140-100 turboprop aircraft is still finding its way to units of the Russian armed forces, be it in small numbers. The latest passenger and cargo aircraft of the type went to the Russian Navy’s Pacific Fleet, on 14 February this year.

How many officially are in service is hard to say. Moscow planned to have at least 20 operational, but after the conflict with Ukraine resulted in an industrial break-up between Antonov and the Russian partners, the air frames already in Russia are planned to be finished with solely Russian equipment. As far as our sources go, we estimate the number of operational AN-140-100s within the Russian armed forces to be between 8 and 14, but Moscow wishes for more. Russian Aviacor is believed to deliver at least six of the machines it had on its premises in various stages of unfinished construction.

The AN-140-100 is able to transport up to 52 people or about 19,000 lbs (about 8,500) of cargo (including fuel weight) over 2,290 miles (3,700 km) of distance. It can operate from unpaved airstrips, which makes it an ideal aircraft to operate in island rich environments where unprepared or short airstrips are common.

© 2017 Airheadsfly.com editor Marcel Burger
Featured image: Official release photo of the AN-140-100 like the one recently delivered to the Russian Navy’s Pacific Fleet (Image © Russian Ministry of Defence)

Indonesia eyes five Airbus A400M transporters

Indonesia is set to buy five Airbus A400M military airlift aircraft, worth 2 billion USD, according to reports on Thursday 19 January. If indeed true, that’s great news for Airbus and its somewhat troubled A400M program. 

Indonesia was already known to eye the A400M as a replacement and add on for C-130 Hercules aircraft. Indonesia in recent years purchased additional C-130s from Australia, one of which unfortunately was lost in crash in 2016.

The A400M is in service in six countries, being France, the UK, Germany, Turkey and Malaysia. Additionaly, Belgium and Luxembourg have ordered the type.

An order would be a very welcome boost for the A400M program, that suffered a fatal crash almost two years ago, plus some bad press in the German press in particular.

Spain gets its hands on first Airbus A400M

The Spanish Air Force took delivery of its first Airbus A400M on Thursday 17 November. It is the first of 27 aircraft ordered. Spain is the sixth nation to put the A400M into service, following France, the UK, Germany, Turkey and Malaysia.

Representatives of the Spanish Air Force and Ministry of Defense formally accepted the aircraft, known as MSN44, from Airbus in a brief ceremony at the A400M final assembly line (FAL) in Seville, Spain.

The A400M will replace the Spanish Air Force’s C-130 Hercules. Under an agreement signed in September, 14 aircraft will be delivered at a steady pace between now and 2022, and the remaining 13 are scheduled for delivery from 2025 onwards. It is however not clear if Spain will actually take up this last batch, as funds may not allow it. In that case, Spain could very well re-sell the aircraft.

The Spanish A400M fleet will be based at Zaragoza in north east Spain and will operate alongside medium C295 and CN235, and light C212 aircraft – MSN44 will fly to Zaragoza in the coming days.

Bangladesh bags an Airbus C295

Bangladesh has become the latest nation to acquire the Airbus C295W medium airlifter with an order for a single aircraft for Bangladesh Army Aviation, Airbus reported on Tuesday 11 October. The aircraft, in transport configuration, will be delivered in the second half of 2017 under a contract that also includes customer support and training.

The C295W is qualified for the transport of troops and bulky/palletized cargo, paratrooping and medical evacuation. It is the first multi-engine fixed-wing aircraft to be operated by Bangladesh Army Aviation

Airbus Defence and Space’s Head of Marketing and Sales, Jean-Pierre Talamoni said: “The C295W will markedly increase the transport capability of Bangladesh Army Aviation. We look forward to working with this new customer to secure a smooth entry into service and to supporting the aircraft for many years to come. ”

With this new order the number of operators for the C295 rises to 26, says Airbus.

Germany fed up with A400M, set to buy C-130 with France

Germany is set to buy and operate four to six Lockheed Martin C-130J Super Hercules transport aircraft in a joint effort with France, German reports say on Tuesday 4 October. Berlin with such a move clearly shows it doesn’t have much faith in the Airbus A400M, which is now being delivered to the German Luftwaffe at a painfully slow rate while also showing shortcomings for which Berlin seeks compensation.

The Hercules aircraft are to be delivered in 2021 and based in France, according to sources. They would be fitted especially for special operations and be able to operate from unpaved runways.

Signal
If anything, the purchase is a clear signal to Airbus that the Germans are fed up with the A400M. Germany has 53 of the type on order but only saw delivery of a handful of aircraft as a result of production delays and operational limitations. Berlin now apparently think the A400M will never be the ‘tactical’ airlifter it thought it ordered.

France already ordered four C-130J Super Hercules aircraft earlier, while Germany was known before to also look at other options apart from the A400M. A joint purchase of new C-130s was never on the cards, however. The German-Franco aircraft will likely be stationed at Orleans airbase in France, home to the existing French Hercules fleet.