All posts by AIRheads/EH

The hours

An US Air Force F-16D seen at Luke Air Force Base in October 2000. This is a similar aircraft to the US F-16 that hit 7,238 flying hours, many more then any Dutch F-16 has ever clocked. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
An US Air Force F-16D seen at Luke Air Force Base in October 2000. This is a similar aircraft to the US F-16 that hit 7,238 flying hours, many more than any Dutch F-16 has ever clocked. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

There is an ongoing shady discussion in the Netherlands about a speedy replacement of the current F-16s with spankin’ new F-35A Lightnings. Shady, because it partly revolves around the number of flying hours the F-16s clocked up so far. We crunch some numbers and find out some numbers are far more impressive than others.

Just take a quick look at this stuff, the answer of the Dutch Ministry of Defence on questions from Dutch parliament about the number of flying hours per Dutch F-16. It shows that the aircraft with registration J-637 is the champion of all, having flown 4,893 flying hours already by December 2011. That’s a lot … Until we read this, about an USAF F-16 that happily flew 7,238 hours. This is stuff we love!

Yearly, each Dutch F-16 spends 180 hours in the air – give or take a few hours – so our hero J-637 now probably has over 5,000 flying hours. The Dutch MoD claims that its Fighting Falcons are getting old and require more and more maintenance.

Sounds logical. But why then is an American F-16 of similar age – the US high-flyer was delivered in 1984, while J-637 was delivered the year before – capable of spending 7,238 hours in the air while the Dutch fighters apparently start falling apart after 4,500 hours or so. Upgrades such as Pacer SLIP and Falcon Up should have prolonged service life beyond 6,000 flying hours, and have been costing the Dutch taxpayers millions and millions of euros. A service life of 8,000 hours was even mentioned back then. Recent updates to newer US aircraft even go as far as to give 10,000 hours of life for each airframe.

The usual argument is that Dutch F-16s were used more extensively then originally planned, for example during operations over Kosovo, Afghanistan and Libya. That’s probably true, although a lot of flying time is actually spent high up in the air, waiting for the close-air-support call or just looking for a tanker. Not exactly the most stressfull situation for any airframe. And still: the US high-flyer spent most of its years in the hands of inexperienced trainee pilots at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. That’s a lot of hard landings, bumpy rides and mishandling. And besides that, a day at the fence of Luke shows based F-16s flying around with the same heavy weaponry that supposedly stressed out the Dutch Vipers all these years. For the record, Dutch F-16 J-015 – the current demo aircraft – only has 3,500 hours or so at this moment.

The Norwegians and the Danish – not to mention the Israelis (how about their flying hours?) – are still happily flying their oldest vintage 1978 F-16s, while the Dutch put those aside more than a decade ago, stripping them for parts and throwing the remains in the bin.

Dutch F-16AM J-254 was taken out of service years ago and clocked up a number flying hours that almost certain wasn' t anywhere close to 7,238 hours. The aircraft's tail number is not mentioned in the Dutch MoD documents, because it is not operational anymore.  (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Dutch F-16AM J-254 was taken out of service years ago and clocked up a number flying hours that almost certain wasn’t anywhere close to 7,238 hours. The aircraft’s tail number is not mentioned in the Dutch MoD documents, because this aircraft is not operational anymore. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

The Americans know how to treat an aircraft that fulfilled its task. Their high-flyers are resting in the Arizona desert, having done their job. We will not mention that even those aircraft will return to the sky as QF-16s, clocking up even more hours, only to be finally shot to pieces as live targets. How’s that for scrapping?

© 2013 AIRheads’ Elmer van Hest

Check out the Royal Netherlands Air Force Orbat at Scramble.nl

Oh my! An airplane landed safely!

Coverage on the website of Dutch national public broadcast company NOS.
Coverage on the website of Dutch national public broadcast company NOS.

Breaking news today: a Delta Airlines Flight from Paris to Detroit diverted to Amsterdam Schiphol and landed without a problem. Amazing stuff, according to just about all Dutch media, who are in fact clueless about aviation but all the more guided by money and even more stupidly, each other.

In a attempt to not miss out on a ‘dramatic developing story’ of an ‘impending horrifying crash’ involving ‘296 terrified and innocent’ passengers, all major Dutch media were quick to publish about flight DAL99, a Delta Airlines A330 on its way from Paris to Detroit. After take-off it experienced technical problems and the crew decided to divert to Amsterdam. This – and especially the fuel burning orbits circuit over the UK – was noticed by some tweeps on Flightradar24, was put on Twitter – and yep, a small media storm was born.

It resulted in cameras filming an uneventful, uninspiring landing. They could have known, because an aircraft experiencing flap problems – as was the story – is not a very big thing. It’s nothing at all, actually. And it wasn’t, really. Approach speed as seen on Flightradar24 was 141 knots. That’s excellent, right on the mark, probably not even a flap problem at all.

Dutch media seemed to have written this plane off already before it landed and the passengers’ only moan was being in Amsterdam and not in Detroit. Discussion about the ‘mysterious’ orbits over the UK, an escort from the French Air Force and even by a helicopter (yes!), possible hijack… yeah, we saw it all today, and Flightradar24 saw a great number of hits. Good on them.

Media want their journalists to be generalists these days, and the ridiculous stuff they put down the throats of their audience is the result of that. Specialists in editorial teams would prevent this ‘breaking news’ from hitting the screens. But no news equals no commercial value, which is why there is no room for specialists.

The media should be breaking bad habits, and not bring news that never was news in the first place.

© 2013 AIRheads’ Elmer van Hest

Magic Mirage

So, no more Brazilian Mirages from December on. Well, that’s one reason less to go there, although we are pretty sure there are many reasons left. But that’s future stuff; over the past 25 years or so, Mirages have worked their magic pretty well on us. Let’s see a few.

Yeah, there's two in there. Nice autumn light on these Dijon Deltas. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Yeah, there’s two in there. Nice autumn light on these Dijon Deltas. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The REAL Mirage, according to us. The classic shape of a classic fighter - from Switzerland. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The REAL Mirage, according to us. The classic shape of a classic fighter – from Switzerland. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Spain_MirageF1
The Spanish Mirage F1s ended their flying career earlier in 2013. This one is seen fully active at Florennes, Belgium. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The Swiss also operated Mirages in the recce role. Good thing it came with a great camouflage job. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The Swiss also operated Mirages in the recce role. Good thing it came with a great camouflage job. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Mirages come in bigger size also, but not bigger than this Mirage 4P taking off from Kleine Brogel, Belgium. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Mirages come in bigger size also, but no bigger than this Mirage 4P taking off from Kleine Brogel, Belgium. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Colmar, France, 1995. That about sums it up for this Mirage F1CT. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Colmar, France, 1995. That about sums it up for this Mirage F1CT. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Oh yeah, always finish with something rare, is what we say. Well, it is a shitty picture, but it IS a Moroccan Mirage F1, albeit pictured in Reims, France. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Oh yeah, always finish with something rare, is what we say. Well, it is a shitty picture, but it IS a Moroccan Mirage F1, albeit pictured in Reims, France. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

End of life for Brazilian Deltas

The twelve Brazilian Mirage 2000s were bought from France. Pictured here is a Mirage 2000 operated by the Armée de l'Air. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The twelve Brazilian Mirage 2000s were bought from France. Pictured here is a Mirage 2000 still operated by the Armée de l’Air. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

Brazil will retire its Mirage 2000s by the end of year, several Brazilian media announced this week. The twelve Mirages, compromising single- and two-seaters were bought from France for a sum of 80 million USD. The aircraft are nearing the end of their service-life.

The Brazilian Deltas started service in Brazil only in 2005, and were originally meant to be in service until 2011. Two years were added to that, but now the end is nearby. The aircraft will be temporarily replaced by up to twelve F-5M fighters, modernized by Embraer. Some time in the future the Brazilian government will decide upon a definitive replacement aircraft. Candidates are the Boeing Super Hornet, Saab Gripen NG and the Dassault Rafale.

Source: Força Aerea Brasileira

Check out the Brazilian Air Force Orbat at Scramble.nl

More Poseidon adventure

Rotate! A Boeing P-8 takes to the sky in Renton, WA. (Image © Boeing)
Rotate! A Boeing P-8 takes to the sky in Renton, WA. (Image © Boeing)

The US Navy awarded Boeing a $1.98 billion contract for 13 additional P-8A Poseidon aircraft, continuing the modernization of U.S. maritime patrol capabilities that will ultimately involve more than 100 P-8As. Boeing announced the deal on August 1, 2013.

The US Navy has now ordered 37 of the 117 P-8As it is expected to buy. To date, 10 have been delivered. Based on the Boeing Next-Generation 737-800 commercial airplane, the P-8 provides anti-submarine, anti-surface warfare as well as intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities. The P-8 is replacing the Navy’s P-3 aircraft.

Boeing assembles P-8As in the same facility where it builds all its 737s. The Poseidon team uses a first-in-industry in-line process that takes advantage of the efficiencies in the Next-Generation 737 production system. After initial assembly, the  P-8A aircraft enter a separate mission system installation and checkout facility for final modifications and testing.

Initial operational test and evaluation (IOT&E) was completed in March; the US Navy announced July 1 that the P-8A program had passed IOT&E and the P-8A was ready for fleet introduction.

Source: Boeing