All posts by AIRheads/EH

Goodbye to South Korean Hawks & Talons

The Republic of Korea Air Force (ROKAF) is saying good bye to its Hawk Mk67s. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The Republic of Korea Air Force (ROKAF) is saying goodbye to its Hawk Mk67s. The aircraft above is one of ten now registered in the US. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

The Republic of Korea Air Force (ROKAF) is getting rid of its twenty year old British Aerospace Hawk Mk67 aircraft, as ten of them showed up on the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) register last week. The aircraft are reportedly owned by AirUSA in Nevada. The ROKAF is replacing these Hawks with indigenous developed and built T-50 Golden Hawk aircraft. AIRheads↑FLY visited South Korea years ago, the faboulous dish of kimchi being our main target. Oh, and we saw some of those Hawks as well.

The ROKAF Hawk were based at Yecheon airbase in central South Korea. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The ROKAF Hawk were stationed at Yecheon airbase in central South Korea. Deliveries began in 1993. This aircraft is caught landing at its homebase in autumn 2004. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The camouflage on these aircraft was as striking as the dayglow parts. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The camouflage on these aircraft was as striking as the orange dayglow parts. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

Talon
Not only did the Koreans say goodbye to the Hawks, they did the very same to the thirty Northrop T-38A Talons that were leased from the US. In South Korea, these trainers also used Yecheon as their homebase. Over the last few years, the Talons returned stateside, where they returned flying in USAF service. Most of them are now operating from Holloman AFB, NM.

The dayglow was also found on the T-38A Talons in South Korea. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The orange dayglow was also found on the T-38A Talons in South Korea. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The Hawks and T-38 shared the runway at Yecheon airbase. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The Hawks and T-38 shared the runway at Yecheon airbase. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
T-38s are gone from South Korean skies, but continue training pilots in many countries. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
T-38s are gone from South Korean skies, but continue to train pilots in many countries. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

And what replaces both the Hawks and Talons is the Korea Aircraft Industries (KAI) T-50; a state of the art two-seater that is capable of supersonic speeds. The T-50 is flying in substantial numbers in South Korea now, and recently the first aircraft were delivered to Indonesia.

Seen landing at Sacheon is the second KAI T-50 prototype. The installation over the exhaust houses an anti spin dragchute. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
This is the second KAI T-50 prototype, seen in October 2004. (Image © Dennis Spronk)

 

© 2013 AIRheads’ Elmer van Hest

Check out the RoKAF Orbat at Scramble.nl

First T-50 Golden Hawks land in Indonesia

Nice colours on the Indonesian T-50s! (Image © TNI-AU)
Nice colours on the Indonesian T-50s! (Image © TNI-AU)

The first two T-50 Golden Hawks for the Indonesian air force (TNI-AU) arrived in Indonesia today, two years after an agreement for 16 aircraft was signed with Korea Aerospace Industries (KAI). The aircraft left for Indonesia after leaving Seochan airfield, home of KAI and birthplace of the T-50 Golden Hawk.

The contract for 16 T-50i aircraft – as the Indonesian version of the Golden Hawk is officially designated – is worth 400 million USD. The supersonic trainers are to replace the BAe Hawk Mk53s that are now in service with the TNI-AU.

The ferry flight from South Korea to Indonesia took about seven hours to complete. Click here for an air to air shot of the T-50s escorted by a Hawk. All 16 aircraft will be delivered during the coming months, in a total of eight ferry flights.

The South Korean T-50, that very much resembles a scaled down F-16, first flew in August 2002. The Republic of South Korea Air Force (ROKAF) operates a substantial nuber of T-50s. The type is also used by ROKAFs display team, the Black Eagles.

Other countries have expressed interest in the Golden Hawk. Among those countries is the Philippines.

Seen landing at Sacheon is the second KAI T-50 prototype. The installation over the exhaust houses an anti spin dragchute. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Seen landing at Sacheon is the second KAI T-50 prototype. The installation on top of the exhaust houses an anti spin dragchute. (Image © Dennis Spronk)

© 2013 AIRheads’ Elmer van Hest

Check out the Indonesian Air Force Orbat at Scramble.nl

Fassberg Flyers

The future of German army aviation. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
The future of German army aviation. (Image © Dennis Spronk)

Last weekend, AIRheads↑FLY took the Autobahn to Bremen, traveled a bit more through some German woods, came across some villages and finally ended up in a large place with lots of helicopters. That place is Fassberg, home of Transporthubschrauberregiment 10, flying NH Industries NH90 helicopters and good ol’ Bell Hueys. And what coincidence, at September 7th Fassberg was home to the Aerospace Day 2013.

German? Mais non, this is a French EC665 Tigre helicopter. Fassberg is home to the Franco-German training facility for the Tigre. That explains all. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
German? Mais non, this is a French EC665 Tigre helicopter. Fassberg is home to the Franco-German training facility for the Tigre. That explains all! (Image © Dennis Spronk)
As German as a Volkswagen; a Messerschmitt-Bölkow-Blohm Bo105. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
As German as a Volkswagen; a Messerschmitt-Bölkow-Blohm Bo105. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
During the Aerospace Day, a small flying display was held. This NH90 was part of it. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
During the Aerospace Day, a small flying display was held. This NH90 was part of it. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
HEER, it says on the tail of this NH90. That basically means Army Aviation Corps. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
HEER, it says on the tail of this NH90. That basically means Army Aviation Corps. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
A true workhorse, the Sikorsky - but made in Germany - CH-53G. The Germans ordered 110 of these things in the late sixties. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
A true workhorse, the Sikorsky – but made in Germany – CH-53G. The Germans ordered 110 of these things in the late sixties. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
A Tigre. Or actually; only half a Tigre. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
A Tigre. Or actually; only half a Tigre. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Spacy helmet at Aerospace Day 2013 at Fassberg. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Spacy helmet at Aerospace Day 2013 at Fassberg. (Image © Dennis Spronk)

© 2013 AIRheads’ Dennis Spronk

And the losers are …

The JAS 39 Gripen (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The JAS 39 Gripen (Image © Elmer van Hest)

As reported this week, the F-35A Lightning II has taken the final hurdle in the Netherlands. That leaves a few companies with empty hands, although it has to be said that Saab, Dassault and Eurofighter GmbH did just about everything they could. It’s however no major surprise that the F-35A will after all replace the Dutch F-16 in a few years time. Saab, Dassault, and Eurofighter GmbH were essentially the losers from the word ‘go’, as the Dutch MoD basically had only thing in mind. Here goes a tribute to losers!

The granddaddy of all; the first Rafale first flew on 4 July 1986, two months before the first Eurofighter technology demonstrater and two years before the first Saab Gripen. This is the same Rafale at the Le Bourget in 1991. Excuse the shitty picture, but the Rafale happens to be our favoruite loser. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Le grand-père of all; the first Rafale first flew on 4 July 1986, two months before the first Eurofighter technology demonstrator and two years before the first Saab Gripen. This is the same Rafale at the Le Bourget Airshow in 1991. Excuse the shitty picture, but Rafale happens to be our favourite loser. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

In 2001, Rafale, Gripen and Eurofighter went head to head at the Leeuwarden airshow in the Netherlands. The JSF – as the F-35 was known as back then – was nowhere to been seen, since the prototype X-35 only flew first in October 2000.

First up was this Saab JAS39A Gripen. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
First up was this Saab JAS 39A Gripen … (Image © Elmer van Hest)
... followed by this Italian pre production EF2000. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
… followed by this Italian pre-production EF2000. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Closing the curtains was the Rafale B. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Closing the curtains at Leeuwarden was this Rafale B. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

In the years that followed, all three competitors started appearing in European skies more and more, while the F-35 only really started testing in late 2006.

In 1997, Eurofighters started to appear in the UK, Germany, Spain and Italy. This Spanish twoseater was a unfortunate one, as it crashed in November 2002. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
In 1997, Eurofighters started to appear in the UK, Germany, Spain and Italy. This Spanish two-seater was an unfortunate one, as it crashed in November 2002. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Nice motion blur on this Swedish Saab JAS39A, seen in June 2006 at Satenäs in Sweden. The model A Gripen have now been replaced by C models. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Nice motion blur on this Swedish Saab JAS 39A, seen in June 2006 at Såtenäs in Sweden. The model A Gripen has now been replaced by C models. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
New type, new training. In the UK, RAF Coningsby was and is the place to be for Typhoons, as the Eurofighter EF2000 is now called. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
New type, new training. In the UK, RAF Coningsby was and is the place to be for Typhoons, as the Eurofighter EF2000 is now called. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

Export
As production mounted, Saab, Dassault and Eurofighter started looking for export customers for their hardware in the hope that sells would really take off. All types saw action in the 2011 Libya war. Meanwhile, testing of the F-35 continues in the US. Some time between August 2016 and December 2016, the first USAF F-35 squadron will reach Initial Operational Capability.

A Rafale C takes off loaded with maximum fuel (Image © Elmer van Hest)
June 2008: an Armée de l’Air Rafale C takes off loaded with maximum fuel. Despite many efforts, the sky remains cloudy for Dassault. The company still hasn’t sold a single Rafale outside France. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Saab is actually not with empty hands. The company has exported the Gripen to the Czech Republic, Hungary, South Africa and Thailand. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Slightly clearer skies for Saab. The Swedish company exported the Gripen to the Czech Republic, Hungary, South Africa and Thailand. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The Eurofighter Typhoon was sold succesfully to Saudi Arabia. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The Eurofighter Typhoon was sold successfully to Saudi Arabia. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

Show off
In recent years, Gripens, Rafales and Eurofighters were steady performers at airshows worldwide. It is unclear when the first F-35 will be seen outside the United States.

Stick 'm up! (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Light ‘m up! (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Stick 'm up again! (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Light ‘m up again! (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The Gripen design in true form. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The Gripen design in true form. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Spanish Typhoon rolling during an airshow. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
A Spanish Typhoon rolling during an airshow. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
A Rafale rolling as well. Rafale and Eurofighter went head to head during several bids. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
A Rafale rolling as well. Rafale and Eurofighter went head to head during several bids. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Gripen on approach (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Landing time for this Gripen. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Landing time for this RAF Typhoon. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Typhoon on approach. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Rafale aims for a touchdown, and is still doing so in 2013. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Rafale aims for a touchdown, and is still doing so in 2013. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
As a matter of fact, older JAS39A Gripens are already used as museum pieces. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Forever touchdown: older JAS 39A Gripens are already used as museum pieces. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

The final loser
There is however one more loser in the well over a decade long debate about a Dutch F-16 replacement. It’s the F-35A Lightning II that in some years time will touch down on Dutch soil, but will have to do its very best to win the hearts and trust of Dutch taxpayers. Plus, we at AIRheads↑FLY simply think its not the sexiest thing in the sky. Go Rafale!

Dutch F-35A F-001 seen over Texas. (Image © Ministerie van Defensie)
Dutch F-35A F-001 seen over Texas. (Image © Ministerie van Defensie)

© 2013 AIRheads’ Elmer van Hest

Dutch JSF takes final hurdle

Dutch F-35A F-001 seen over Texas. (Image © Ministerie van Defensie)
Dutch F-35A F-001 seen over Texas. (Image © Ministerie van Defensie)

A Dutch order for F-35 aircraft seems only a matter of time now that the leftist PvdA party dropped its opposition against the fighter, according to Dutch media. There now is sufficient support in Dutch parliament to proceed with the order of 35 F-35s – or JSF, as the aircraft is still often called in the Netherlands.

The move by PvdA ends more than a decade of discussion about the replacement of Dutch F-16 fighter aircraft by the F-35. According to sources in The Hague, the Dutch government -made up by PvdA and right-wing VVD –  will finally decide on the order later in September.

The Dutch already took delivery of two F-35 aircraft earlier for test purposes. Despite those deliveries, an order for further F-35s remained subject of heated discussion that mostly focused on costs. One F-35 costs at least 65 million Euro, where 40 million Euro was originally planned. The total budget for the order is 4.5 billion Euro.

Dutch government will present its 2014-plans in two weeks time. A further reduction of available F-16s is on the cards. The two F-35 already delivered – with serial F-001 and F-002 – are still in the United States and will remain so for the foreseeable future. Real testing should start only in 2015.

Read our blog on Dutch F-16s and their flying hours here.

© 2013 AIRheads’ Elmer van Hest

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