Final landing for F-16 ‘Netz’ in Israel

A total of 335,000 flight hours spread over 474,000 sorties. Yes, the numbers are impressive for the F-16A and B version in Israel. However, these early built F-16s finally left Israeli Air Force service on Monday 26 december 2016, more than 36 years after  delivery of the first jets in 1980. Their final landing was at Ouvda airbase in the southern part of Israel.

These ‘original’ F-16s were named Netz in Hebrew and made famous by their role in taking out the Osiraq nuclear reactor in Iraq on 7 June 1981, only a year or so after delivery of the first jets to Israel. By that time, an Israeli Air Force F-16 was already responsible for the very first air-to-air kill by an F-16.

Over the years, many dozens of F-16 Netz aircraft were extensively used by the Israelis and responsible for many more air-to-air victories. Nevertheless, more capable F-16C/D Barak and F-16I Sufa jets began taking over their role. The Netz was then used as a trainer aircraft, a role that also has some to end with the delivery of thirty M-346 Lavi trainer jets.

The last of these early model F-16s were flown by 115 ‘Flying Dragon squadron at Ouvda, who also used the Netz in an agressor role. Over the years, Israel already retired a substantial number of these jets.

According to Haaretz newspaper, 40 F-16s are now offered for sale. In the past, Israel already sold off substantial numbers of surplus A-4 Skyhawks. Most found a second life by being used for air combat training by civilian companies such as Draken International and Discovery Air Defence Services.

© 2016 Airheadsfly.com editor Elmer van Hest
Featured image (top): Two F-16A Netz aircraft in Israel. (Image © Israeli Air Force)

The F-16I is called ‘Sufa’ (Storm) in Israeli service. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

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