The first unmanned QF-16 Full Scale Aerial Target flight on Sept. 19 at Tyndall Air Force Base (Image © Staff Sergeant Javier Cruz/USAF)

To be killed in mid-air: US Air Force orders 30 more QF-16s

They will not end their flying days in glory, but they are still aircraft of some sort: the Boeing/Lockheed Martin QF-16. The multi-role fighter turned into full-scale aerial target is increasing in numbers, now that Boeing got a US Air Force order for another 30 QF-16s.

While Lockheed Martin still has high hopes for the newest V-version of the legendary Fighting Falcon once designed, developed and initially produced by General Dynamics in the 1970s, the older kids on the block are about to be shot out of the sky. Literately, as the whole purpose of a full-scale aerial target is to train modern fighter jocks in other aircraft in aerial combat.

QF-16 will get killed

Piloted remotely by a guy or girl with hands on the sticks on the ground, the QF-16 will get killed in mid-air by the cannon or missiles fired from other aircraft that hunt it down. QF-16s can still be operated like normal jets, with a real pilot in the cockpit, for training or test sorties.

Fourth batch

American tax payers will spend more than 35 million on the fourth batch (Lot 4) of 30 QF-16s. Work will be done in St. Louis, Missouri, and the last of the aircraft now ordered will enter service of its probably short mission life in April 2018.

At Tyndell AFB

In March 2015 the US Air Force started to build up its fleet of tens of QF-16s with the first 13 aircraft (Lot 1), with the 82nd Aerial Targets Squadron at Tyndall AFB, Florida. As you read on Airheadsfly.com the QF-16s are replacing the Vietnam War era QF-4 in that role. The first flight of the QF-16 was in September 2013, and we show you the cool video footage.

© 2016 Airheadsfly.com editor Marcel Burger
Featured image: The first unmanned QF-16 Full Scale Aerial Target flight on Sept. 19 at Tyndall Air Force Base (Image © Staff Sergeant Javier Cruz/USAF)