A Royal Netherlands Air Force Cougar in the new grey livery (Image © Ministerie van Defensie)

Saved from the axe: Cougar helicopter in the Netherlands

Under economic pressure the Royal Netherlands Air Force (RNLAF) was saying goodbye to the Cougar helicopter, but the vital function of the tactical transport helicopter saved from the axe was shown clearly this week during an airlanding exercise near Arnhem, the Netherlands.

The military training grounds of Deelen and the Ede Heath saw a lot of action in a normally quiet Autumn. A total of six RNLAF choppers were flying back and forth with military equipment, from pallets to vehicles. The double rotor choppers – aka Boeing CH-47 Chinooks – are not easy to miss, but the quieter and real stars of the show were the AS532U2 Cougars.

Providing an airhead with necessary military equipment in the last week of November 2015. Taken on the training grounds near Arnhem (Image © Ministerie van Defensie)
Providing an airhead with necessary military equipment in the last week of November 2015. Taken on the training grounds near Arnhem (Image © Ministerie van Defensie)

SFOR in Bosnia

Seventeen of these machines won over the legendary Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk when the Royal Netherlands Army was looking for a proper rotary airlift in the 1990s. Designed by Aérospatiale, built by its successor Eurocopter and currently named Airbus Helicopters, the French built machines arrived in 1996 and 1997. Their service record has not been without trouble. The machines were notorious for leaking fuel and the lack of de-icing equipment did hamper operations a bit while 5 machines operated with the NATO-led Stabilisation Force (SFOR) in Bosnia in 2001, the RNLAF Cougars’ first operational deployment.

Neither fond of heat the Cougars also had some issues while flying from Tallil Airbase in Iraq in 2004. Operation in 2006 to 2010 as part of the Royal Netherlands Armed Forces Task Force Uruzgan in Afghanistan were limited by Cougars not only having to combat heat but also high altitude operations, flying from inside the Uruzgan province and Kandahar.

The RNLAF Cougar in its original camouflage livery (Image © Marcel Burger)
The RNLAF Cougar in its original camouflage livery (Image © Marcel Burger)

Bambibucket

But the choppers were still able to perform important tasks in support of the Royal Netherlands Army, as Search-and-Rescue or medevac asset, as shipborne troop transport helicopter for the amphibian forces of the Marine Corps of the Royal Netherlands Navy embarked on landing transport docks, and as fire fighter with the so-called bambibucket both at home and abroad.

Demonstrating the use of the bambi-bucket during a wildfire near the city of Assen in the Netherlands in 2011 (Image © Ministerie van Defensie)
Demonstrating the use of the bambi-bucket during a wildfire near the city of Assen in the Netherlands in 2011 (Image © Ministerie van Defensie)

Flying up to 500 miles (800 km) – further with additional fuel tanks – the Cougar operates normally with a crew of four: pilot, co-pilot, loadmaster and door gunner on a 7.62 mm machine gun. The cargo hold has room for 10 fully equipped troops or 14 without equipment. In the medevac role a doctor/anesthetist and a nurse are on board to take car of up to six patients, three sitting up and three lying down.

Gilze Rijen Airbase

All Cougars fly with 300 Squadron, operating from Gilze Rijen Airbase. The unit’s personnel were shocked to learn in 2011 that their job was about to disappear when the Ministry of Defence in the Hague announced another round of downsizing. But even with the awaited beefing up of the Boeing CH-47F Chinook fleet to 20 machines, having the NH90 choppers on strength at 18 the military and defence policital leadership say they have noticed a lack of rotary wing capacity if there would no longer be any Cougars.

The two "looks" of the Dutch Cougars, flying in together over Gilze Rijen Airbase in 2014 (Image © Marcel Burger)
The two “looks” of the Dutch Cougars, flying in together over Gilze Rijen Airbase in 2014 (Image © Marcel Burger)

Cougar service life

So the French design from 1965 will stay part of the fleet until at least 2023, Defence minister Jeanine Hennis-Plasschaert recently wrote to the parliament in the Hague. Currently down to 12 operational machines a even smaller number of Cougars will keep on flying till the end of their new decided service life until the leadership is confident the Foxtrot Chinooks and NH90s can do the job together.

Cougar training with commandos on Curaçao, one of the Dutch territories in the Caribbean (Image © Ministerie van Defensie)
Cougar training with commandos on Curaçao, one of the Dutch territories in the Caribbean (Image © Ministerie van Defensie)
The core of air mobility of the Royal Netherlands Air Force: a Cougar working in tandem with a Chinook to fly in military equipment to the 11th Air Mobile Brigade Some Cougars were painted in the new grey livery, seen here at the Cougars home base of Gilze Rijen in 2014 (Image © Marcel Burger)
The core of air mobility of the Royal Netherlands Air Force: a Cougar working in tandem with a Chinook to fly in military equipment to the 11th Air Mobile Brigade, with the Boeing AH-64 Apaches (foreground) providing fire power cover (Image © Marcel Burger)

11th Airborne Brigade

As illustrated again at the Ede Heath and Deelen training grounds this week, the Cougars and Chinooks often operate closely together with the 11th Airborne Brigade of the Royal Netherlands Army. That capacity – although not fully used since 2013 as the red berets have been deployed more conventionally – is something the Netherlands would like to keep. Possibly in light of the increased Russian activity on the borders with NATO, where the strengthened Russian Aviation Regiments are training on blitzkrieg-like offensive maneouvres by quickly moving sizable ground units through the air by Mil Mi-8/Mi-17s escored by Mi-24/35 Hind attack helicopters.

Some Cougars were painted in the new grey livery, seen here at the Cougars home base of Gilze Rijen in 2014 (Image © Marcel Burger)
Some Cougars were painted in the new grey livery, seen here at the Cougars home base of Gilze Rijen in 2014 (Image © Marcel Burger)

Backed by renewed trust the men and women of 300 Squadron of the RNLAF showed this week that although plagued through its service life, they are up to the challenge of airlifting combat reinforcements to airheads in the field, in the way the AS532U2 Cougar was originally purchased for.

© 2015 Airheadsfly.com editor Marcel Burger
Featured image: A Royal Netherlands Air Force Cougar in the new grey livery (Image © Ministerie van Defensie)