A USAF F-15E Strike Eagle from the 48th Fighter Wing on 12 November 2015 over the northern Mediterranean. The unit is deployed to Incirlik AB in Turkey as part of Operation Inherent Resolve (Image © Senior Airman Kate Thornton/USAF)

Bombing ISIS has become a Western war

The bombing of the so-called Islamic State (ISIS / ISIL / Daesh) forces in Syria and Iraq has mainly become a limited Western war. The Arab nations of the coalition no longer take part in it. Meanwhile, Germany is on course to join the coalition.

Apart from Syria and Iraq themselves that is. According to fresh reports it’s mainly the United States, Russia and France who currently operate in the entire region. The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) has been reluctant to fly into Syria, especially since Moscow sent its expeditionary wing to Hmeymim Airbase near Latakia on the Syrian coast. The RAAF focuses on Iraq only, from the beginning and now. The Royal Air Force and Royal Netherlands Air Force do take part in operations in Syria.

The Su-34 bomber from the October 2014 batch (Image © Sukhoi Company)
Among the aircraft deployed by Russia to Syria are Su-34 bomber/strike aircraft (Image © Sukhoi Company)

Operation Inherent Resolve

But when it comes to the Arab nations that were initially part of the US led IS bombings dubbed Operation Inherent Resolve, they are no longer there. Bahrain already stopped its flights in February, the United Arab Emirates followed in March, the Royal Jordanian Air Force in August and the Royal Saudi Air Force in September.

War in Yemen

Many of those nations are now actively involved in the military operations in the Yemen, where some rivalising forces are supported by Iran – seen as a opponent by all Arab nations mentioned above. The shifting of involvement is – however – also considered a political one now that the conflict especially in Syria has become more complicated with the Russian armed forces involved.

Two French Air Force Dassault Rafale F1 aircraft in the skies of Iraq after receiving fuel from a Royal Australian Air Force KC-30A Multi Role Tanker Transport, 3 October 2014. The French fly from Al Dhafra Airbase in the UAE (Image © SGT Mick Davis / 1st JPAU / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)
Two French Air Force Dassault Rafale F1 aircraft in the skies of Iraq after receiving fuel from a Royal Australian Air Force KC-30A Multi Role Tanker Transport, 3 October 2014. (Image © SGT Mick Davis / 1st JPAU / Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence)

Climax in Syria

An illustration of the troublesome and fluent situation in the skies over Syria from last Tuesday, 24 November: a Turkish F-16 downed a Russian Air Force Su-24 Fencer, with Moscow saying that the strike aircraft posed no threat to Turkey, and Ankara admitting the aircraft flew inside Turkish aerospace for only 17 seconds. It was the climax so far in a conflict that mainly sees the US, Russia and France in action. Their forces only sometimes cooperate in bombing raids against the ISIS, with the Russian adding an extra volatile touch by bombing all forces opposing the government army of Syria.

© 2015 Airheadsfly.com editor Marcel Burger
Featured image (top): A USAF F-15E Strike Eagle from the 48th Fighter Wing on 12 November 2015 over the northern Mediterranean. The unit is deployed to Incirlik AB in Turkey as part of Operation Inherent Resolve (Image © Senior Airman Kate Thornton/USAF)

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