A Swedish Air Force Gripen low-level (Image © Sergeant Johan Lundahl / Combat Camera / Försvarsmakten)

Low-level flying hazard for Swedish Gripen

Low-level flying has slowly become a hazard for the Swedish Air Force, especially for its SAAB JAS 39 Gripen fast jet. Information about transmission towers / electricity pylons and wind turbines is often so wrong that the military has been limited by how to train compared to a decade ago.

According to a fairly fresh report from the Swedish Crash Investigation Board (Statens Haverikommission) two years ago a JAS 39C Gripen single-seat jet came withing 30 to 60 feet of a so-called wind measuring mast. The near collision was avoided by pure luck, investigators say. More research shows that data provided by the Swedish Geological Agency (Lantmateriet) often is wrong. Towers are placed on different locations than mapped or their height is off compared to what the official data shows. If the Lantmateriet’s information reaches the military at all, because even that seems to be a problem.

To Swedish public Radio 4 flight safety chief Robert Persson of the Swedish Armed Forces HQ says: “We simply no longer operate on low level the same way as we used to.”

© 2015 Airheadsfly.com editor Marcel Burger
Featured image: A Swedish Air Force Gripen low-level (Image © Sergeant Johan Lundahl / Combat Camera / Försvarsmakten)

2 thoughts on “Low-level flying hazard for Swedish Gripen”

    1. Hej Kjell! Tack så mycket! (Thank you!)
      Text adapted.
      /Marcel Burger (editor)

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