Italian built Eurofighter Typhoons for Kuwait

Kuwait has bilaterally agreed to buy 28 Alenia Aermacchi made Eurofighter Typhoons in a competition that apparently left the Boeing F/A-18 Super Hornet defeated. The news came to light on Friday 11 September in Italy.

According to press agency Reuters, the deal is worth 7.5 billion EUR and a contract is to be signed within weeks. The deal is very good news for Eurofighter, which had a hard time selling the Typhoon to other nations other than founding partners Germany, Italy, Spain and the UK. Austria and Saudi Arabia and, in the future, Oman, are the only other nations flying the Typhoon. Eurofighter later on Friday said it ‘welcomes the agreement between Italy and Kuwait for the supply of 28 Eurofighter Typhoons’.

The order reportedly consists of 22 single seat and six two seat aircraft. The Kuwaiti Typhoons are to be manufactured in Alenia Aermacchi’s facility in Turin, where up until now only jets for the Italian Air Force were built, plus left wings for all Typhoons in existence.

Head to head with Typhoon. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Head to head with Typhoon. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

Kuwait Air Force pilots have been getting flight training in Italy for some time, also flying Alenia Aermacchi-made aircraft. At Lecce airbase in southern Italy, the learn basic and advanced fighter jet techniques, using the Alenia Aermacchi MB-339.

For over two decades, Kuwait has been flying the Boeing F/A-18C/D Hornet. These aircraft were hastily delivered after the 1991 Gulf War. For Boeing, the Kuwaiti choice could see the end of F/A-18E/F production. The US company was aiming at a Kuwaiti order to keep production going after completing current US and Australian orders.

© 2015 Airheadsfly.com editor Elmer van Hest
Featured image (top): A brand new Typhoon, produced by Alenia Aermacchi in Turin. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

A Kuwait Air Force F/A-18C Hornet, seen in the UK in 1993 during delivery to Kuwait. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
A Kuwait Air Force F/A-18C Hornet, seen in the UK in 1993 during delivery to Kuwait. (Image © Elmer van Hest)