A KLM Cityhopper Fokker 70 landing at Bristol Airport, United Kingdom (Image (PD) Adrian Pingstone)

Remnants of Dutch aviation pride change hands

The remnants of what was once the pride of the Dutch aviation industry is changing hands. Fokker Technologies has been sold to GKN for 706 million euro, increasing GKN’s position of one of the largest produces of aircraft parts worldwide once the authorities that guard monopolies in both Europe and the United States agree with GKN’s purchase.

A KLM Embraer 190 at Amsterdam-Schiphol International Airport (Image © KLM)
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Fokker Technologies currently produces lightweight aircraft parts, cables and landing gear, plus it does aircraft maintenance and logistics. It is a surviving heritage of the once larger Fokker (Aerospace) that produced hundreds of military and commercial aircraft between 1912 and 1996 – when the company was declared bankrupt. Started by Anthony Fokker in 1912 in Germany, the aircraft manufacturer moved in 1919 to the Netherlands.

The F.27 Friendship became Fokker’s most successful passenger aircraft after World War II, with almost 600 produced plus another 206 by US company Fairchild. Despite that aircraft as a whole have no longer been produced since 1996, the latest models Fokker 50, Fokker 70 and Fokker 100 are still fairly popular and remain operational with airlines and air forces world wide.

A serious attempt since 2010 by the company called Rekkof (“Fokker” spelled backwards) to redevelop and restart production of larger version of the Fokker 70 (F90NG) and a larger version of the Fokker 100 (F120NG) with financial support from the Dutch government has so far not led to the actual start-up of an assembly line.

© 2015 Airheadsfly.com editor Marcel Burger
Featured image (top): A KLM Cityhopper Fokker 70 landing at Bristol Airport, United Kingdom (Image (PD) Adrian Pingstone)

Dutch pride in the shape of a Fokker F.27 Friendship. This Royal Netherlands Air Force aircraft was pictures in July 1996, only four months after its builder Fokker 27 was declared bankrupt - a not so proud moment in Dutch aviation history.  (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Dutch pride in the shape of a Fokker F.27 Friendship. This Royal Netherlands Air Force aircraft was pictures in July 1996, only four months after its builder Fokker 27 was declared bankrupt – a not so proud moment in Dutch aviation history. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The recently transfered Fokker 50 U-06 in its former Royal Netherlands Air Force livery (Image © Ministerie van Defensie)
The Fokker 50 U-06 in Royal Netherlands Air Force livery (Image © Ministerie van Defensie)
One of the Fokker 60UTAs that the Peruvian Naval Aviation commissioned in 2010 (Image © Marina de Guerra del Perú
One of the Fokker 60UTAs that the Peruvian Naval Aviation commissioned in 2010 (Image © Marina de Guerra del Perú
Archive photo of a Fokker 28 of Austrian Arrows at Stockholm-Arlanda IAP. Austrian Arrows has merged in Austrian Airlines (Image © Marcel Burger)
Archive photo of a Fokker 28 of Austrian Arrows at Stockholm-Arlanda IAP. Austrian Arrows has merged in Austrian Airlines (Image © Marcel Burger)