Eagles soar over Leeuwarden

Fighting Falcons are a familiar sight in the skies over the Dutch airbase of Leeuwarden. But these days Eagles join them. They are US Air National Guard F-15 Eagle air superiority aircraft and they deployed from the US to Leeuwarden last week as part of US operation Atlantic Resolve. Soon, they’ll soar over more of Europe. Good news for Eagle fans. Lt. Col. Paul Reedy, commander of the Florida Air National Guard’s 159th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron, is one of them.

“Undefeated in aerial combat.” That about sums up the F-15 Eagle in the eyes of Reedy, who commands the twelve aircraft that flew to Leeuwarden last week along with personnel from the Florida Air National Guard. The deployment also involves staff from Air National Guard units in California, Massachusetts and Oregon, with the latter also providing six aircraft.

The ferry flight from Jacksonville, Florida, was quite eventful, says Reedy. “We postponed our arrival by one day due to turbulence of the Atlantic. We would have had a nice tail wind on the way over here, but that same tail wind would have made for turbulence and quite an uncomfortable ride. When we finally arrived the winds at Leeuwarden were up to 50 knots. In Florida we are used to thunderstorms but not winds that strong. However, there was a window in the weather that allowed us to land here.”

Leeuwarden has become an Eagle's nest. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Leeuwarden has become an Eagle’s nest. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
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Inspection time! (Image © Dennis Spronk)

Frisian Flag
Today, on 8 April, the pilots are  flying joint tactical missions with Royal Netherlands Air Force (RNLAF) F-16s, in preparation for large scale military exercise Frisian Flag, kicking of on 13 April at Leeuwarden. Also joining the exercise are Eurofighter Typhoons from Germany, F-18 Hornets from Finland and Spain, plus Polish F-16s. Reedy: “Our goals are to work on our interoperability with different NATO partners and we’ll be working on our offensive and defensive air-to-air techniques. I myself look forward to meeting Eurofighter Typhoon in the air, as I personally haven’t done that yet. It’s a great learning opportunity.”

Upgrades
About half of the Eagles deployed to Leeuwarden are equipped with the very latest APG-63(V)3 Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) radar. “The F-15 was a great air-to-air platform when it was originally built in the seventies and it still is today. Between then and now we’ve undergone many upgrades of our avionics plus offensive and defense systems. They continue to give us a lethal platform today and into the future”, says Reedy. His tactical nickname is ‘Stoner’ and as a seven year old he dreamed of flying the Eagle. Reedy now has 1,600 hours on type.

Positive rate of climb... (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Positive rate of climb, gear up! (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Positive noise also! (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Positive noise also! (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Let's not forget that Dutch F-16s have been calling Leeuwarden home for well over 30 years. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Let’s not forget that Dutch F-16s have been calling Leeuwarden home for well over 30 years. (Image © Dennis Spronk)

TSP
That lethality is exactly the US wants to show Russia. The F-15s at Leeuwarden are in fact a Theater Security Package (TSP) the US has sent as a show of force to Europe’s Eastern neighbour, the second since US Air Force A-10C “Warthogs” arrived in Germany last February. Those A-10s have been across Europe as well. Just like the Warthogs the Eagles at Leeuwarden will stay on the continent for six months, with personnel rotating. “After taking part in Frisian Flag, we are heading to Graf Ignatievo Airbase in Bulgaria. There we will also train with NATO allies,” says Reedy.

First, on this murky Wednesday in April, there’s training to be done with Royal Netherlands Air Force F-16s. Four Fighting Falcons and four Eagles loudly take off for an air-to-air combat mission. In April the F-15 Eagle will be a familiar sight in the skies over the Netherlands. In fact, it will be a familiar sight in the skies all over Europe for months to come. Surely the predator will be noticed.

© 2015 Airheadsfly.com editor Elmer van Hest
Featured image: Take-off for a F-15 Eagle (Image © Dennis Spronk)

Click to enlarge! (Image © Elmer van Hest)
Click to enlarge! (Image © Elmer van Hest)
About to settle down onto Leeuwarden's runway 23. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
About to settle down onto Leeuwarden’s runway 23. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
There's room for two in the F-15D. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
There’s room for two in the F-15D. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
After inspection... (Image © Dennis Spronk)
After inspection… (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Ready for the next flight. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
… it’s time for the next flight. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Landing time again. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
Landing time again. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
An F-15 Eagle fan: Lt. Col. Paul 'Stoner' Reedy. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
An F-15 Eagle fan: Lt. Col. Paul ‘Stoner’ Reedy. (Image © Dennis Spronk)