The Air Force's first operational CV-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft hovers upon arrival at Kirtland Air Force Base, N.M., Monday, March 20, 2006. (Staff Sgt. Markus Maier © USAF)

Osprey: saving a million dollar engine with glue

The US Air Force has come up with some creative solution in an attempt to save the 1,2 million dollar engines of its CV-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft. A special, fast working and bio-degradable glue is used to bind the ground together, to prevent brown-out clouds of dust and material of messing up the power plants to much.

“Any dust mitigation extends the life of the engine and the prop-rotors,” Col. Dwight Davis, the 58th Operations Group commander, says in a USAF news release. “Starting at about 50 or 60 feet, it’s like having two Category 5 hurricanes coming down.”

The product is called TerraLOC and it costs US$ 70,000 to apply to the ground. Not a cheap solution, but a lot less than the costs of a new engine. In return the Ospreys need to land on predestined landing zones, so the option is so far not applicable to war operations.

© 2015 Airheadsfly.com editor Marcel Burger
The Air Force’s first operational CV-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft hovers upon arrival at Kirtland Air Force Base, N.M., Monday, March 20, 2006.