Col. Roderick Cregier, an F-35 test pilot stationed at Edwards AFB in California, stears the first Luke AFB Lightning II after touching the ground of its home on 10 March 2014 (Image © Staff Sgt. Darlene Seltmann / USAF)

F-35 has fuel temperature issue

Col. Roderick Cregier, an F-35 test pilot stationed at Edwards AFB in California, stears the first Luke AFB Lightning II after touching the ground of its home on 10 March 2014 (Image © Staff Sgt. Darlene Seltmann / USAF)
Featured image: First Luke AFB Lightning II after touching the ground (Image © Staff Sgt. Darlene Seltmann / USAF)
For decades the US Air Force has been training from all of its bases – desert and arctics alike – with green fuel trucks providing the necessary dope to its fighter jets. But, with the coming introduction of the newest stealthy combat aircraft, the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II, there is all of a sudden a problem. The green trucks on hot bases are making the fuel for the jet too warm. This was discovered by ground personnel at Luke AFB, currently the major F-16 training hub of the USAF and the place where the future F-35 jocks will learn their basic skills.

“We painted the refuelers white to reduce the temperature of fuel being delivered to the F-35 Lightning II joint strike fighter,” said Senior Airman Jacob Hartman, a 56th LRS fuels distribution operator to a 56th Fighter Wing Public Affairs officer. “The F-35 has a fuel temperature threshold and may not function properly if the fuel temperature is too high, so after collaborating with other bases and receiving waiver approval from the Air Education Training Command, we painted the tanks of old trucks white.”

How the fuel temperature issue will effect the combat readiness of the new backbone of the US fighter force and many other air forces worldwide during operations in – let’s say – the Southwest Asia – is still uncertain.

© 2014 Airheadsfly.com editor Marcel Burger, with 2nd paragraph quoted from news release of (© 2014) USAF

The first F-35 flown by Edwards AFB test pilot Col. Roderick Cregier arriving at Luke AFB on 10 March 2014, escorted by the 56th Operations Group flagship F-16 piloted by Maj. Justin Robinson (Image © Jim Hazeltine / USAF)
The first F-35 flown by Edwards AFB test pilot Col. Roderick Cregier arriving at Luke AFB on 10 March 2014, escorted by the 56th Operations Group flagship F-16 piloted by Maj. Justin Robinson (Image © Jim Hazeltine / USAF)