A F-22 Raptor climbs after take-off from the flightline on 24 November 2014 at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam (Image © Airman 1st Class Amanda Morris / USAF)

Raptor Pack as Rapid Reaction Force

Other countries like Sweden already use this type of power projection for a long time, but now the US Air Force is joining them. Fielding probably the world’s most advanced jet fighter the USAF is creating routines to send a Raptor pack of four aircraft as a rapid reaction force anytime when it’s needed, anywhere in the world.

Rapid Raptor is the USA’s version of sending a small group of advanced air defence jets on a relative long distance from home to quickly secure and defend another airbase in times of an imminent threat or higher unfriendly air activity. In what is officially still called a proof-of-concept phase the USAF sent four Lockheed Martin F-22 from the 19th Fighter Squadron at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, to Andersen AFB on Guam and “projected power” from 20 to 24 November 2014. One or more Air Force Boeing C-17A Globemaster III strategic airlifters are added to the pack with fuel, additional ammunition, ground crew and support material.

Austere
“This concept embodies the fundamental tenants of air power: speed, flexibility and surprise,” says Lt. Col. David Eaglin, Pacific Air Forces’ Chief of Current Operations and Power Projection Division to a PACAF Public Affairs reporter. “Rapid Raptor will enable us to deploy to and operate from austere locations with a contained cell of personnel and equipment.”

Although Andersen is hardly austere – as it is an active US Air Base – the concept was tested with the Rapid Raptor personnel staying in a tent city on a more remote section of the base. It meant the first time for the 36th Contingency Response Group to be deployed as a part of the detachment supporting Rapid Raptor. This CRG is there to run airfield operations, provided tents, water and air conditioning in addition to moving and inspecting cargo arriving on follow-up airlifters.

Four F-22 Raptors from the 19th Fighter Squadron taxi prior to take-off on 20 November 2014 at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii (Image © Senior Airman Orlando Corpuz / Hawaii Air National Guard)
Four F-22 Raptors from the 19th Fighter Squadron taxi prior to take-off on 20 November 2014 at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii (Image © Senior Airman Orlando Corpuz / Hawaii Air National Guard)
A F-22 Raptor climbs after take-off from the flightline on 24 November 2014 at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam (Image © Airman 1st Class Amanda Morris / USAF)
A F-22 Raptor climbs after take-off from the flightline on 24 November 2014 at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam (Image © Airman 1st Class Amanda Morris / USAF)

Sweden
With budgets and aircraft limited other countries with giant areas to defend have used the type of concept the USAF calls Rapid Raptor already for years. Let’s take Sweden, which rapidly moves a pack of 2 to 8 SAAB JAS 39C/D Gripen fighters supported by its C-130 Hercules transport and/or tanker aircraft (TP 84 in Swedish service) from its fighter bases of Luleå-Kallax, Såtenäs and Ronneby to another part of the country to project power in times of need. The Swedes have lately mostly focused their efforts on Visby Airfield at the strategically located Baltic Sea island of Gotland, with Russian air and sea activity as the reason. But in the last couple of years the same type of ops was run from Uppsala-Ärna Airbase and Kalmar Airfield during so-called Alert exercises (Beredskapsövning).

For example the French Air Force (Armée de l’Air) and Royal Air Force (RAF) run similar operations, but normally use a longer time of planning and preparation.

© 2014 Airheadsfly.com editor Marcel Burger, with source information provided by the USAF’s Pacific Air Forces Public Affairs office

A typical Swedish "incident readiness" flight of two JAS 39 Gripen fighters - here on an unarmed training mission in 1998 - fly by the city of Visby, the main town on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea. (Image © Flygvapnet)
A typical Swedish “incident readiness” flight of two JAS 39 Gripen fighters – here on an unarmed training mission in 1998 – fly by the city of Visby, the main town on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea. (Image © Flygvapnet)