An US Marine Corps MV-22B Osprey taxis after landing at MCAS on August 12, 2013. The tilt-rotor aircraft succeed the CH-46E helicopters. The Ospreys can fly twice as fast, carry three times as much and fly four times the distance of the older CH-46E helicopter it is replacing. (Image © Lance Cpl. Stephen Himes / USMC)

Japan includes Osprey in budget

The Japan Air Self-Defense Force is a step closer in purchasing up to 40 Boeing/Bell V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor transport aircraft. The Japanese Ministry of Defence announced on 21 November 2014 it has included the V-22 in its FY15 budget proposal.

Although we at Airheadsfly.com couldn’t confirm the exact number of aircraft, earlier messages from the Land of the Rising Sun indicate the total number of Osprey aircraft that is required by Tokyo runs into the several tens of machines. However, the initial purchase is likely to be 17 aircraft.

There are already tilt-rotor aircraft operating on Japanese soil, as the US Marine Corps has two squadrons of each 12 aircraft based at MCAS Futenma at the island of Okinawa.

© 2014 Airheadsfly.com editor Marcel Burger

An US Marine Corps MV-22B Osprey taxis after landing at MCAS  on August 12, 2013. The tilt-rotor aircraft succeed the CH-46E helicopters. The Ospreys can fly twice as fast, carry three times as much and fly four times the distance of the older CH-46E helicopter it is replacing. (Image © Lance Cpl. Stephen Himes / USMC)
An US Marine Corps MV-22B Osprey taxis after landing at MCAS on August 12, 2013. The tilt-rotor aircraft succeed the CH-46E helicopters. The Ospreys can fly twice as fast, carry three times as much and fly four times the distance of the older CH-46E helicopter it is replacing. (Image © Lance Cpl. Stephen Himes / USMC)