A Boeing (McDonnell Douglas) AH-64E Apache Guardian in action (Image © US Army)

All Taiwanese Apaches flying, Black Hawks coming

Somewhat similar to the new UH-60s of the Republic of China Army is this Republic of China Air Force S-70C Black Hawk, seen here during a rescue training missions in August 2011 (Image (CC) Hyun Fumio)
Somewhat similar to the new UH-60s of the Republic of China Army is this Republic of China Air Force S-70C Black Hawk, seen here during a rescue training missions in August 2011 (Image (CC) Hyun Fumio)

The Republic of China Army’s (Taiwan) Boeing AH-64E Apache attack helicopters seem to be fine, after the entire newly arrived fleet was initially grounded following a crash on 25 April. More positive news is that Asian nation expects its first batch of 60 new Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk assault/transport choppers in December, according to an Army official to Taiwanese media.

None of the 29 remaining Apaches have suffered a serious mishap since one of the crews crashed the 30th machine into a rooftop of a building in Longtan in the Taoyuan region in Spring. Having quickly established a pilot error as the reason of the crash, the fleet of AH-64s returned to full flight status at the end of May. The last of the 30 machines arrived in October 2014, but the two men that were on board the crashed Apache apparently have not been allowed yet to return to full flight status.

In December six of the 60 UH-60s for the Taiwanese armed forces will arrive by cargo ship. Of those 45 will slowly stream into current Army UH-1 units, where it will start to replace the remaining between 30 and 40 legendary Hueys. The final Black Hawk is planned to be active in 2018. The other 15 new Black Hawks will be used by the National Airborne Service Corps, which is the Interior Ministry’s organisation for disaster relief.

© 2014 Airheadsfly.com editor Marcel Burger

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A Boeing (McDonnell Douglas) AH-64E Apache Guardian in action (Image © US Army)
A Boeing (McDonnell Douglas) AH-64E Apache Guardian in action (Image © US Army)