A F-5EM from the Força Aérea Brasileira (FAB) during Cruzex Crusade (Image © Ralph Blok)

Game on for Força Aérea Brasileira

A Brazilian Air Force F-5EM Tiger on take off. (Image © Ralph Blok)
A Brazilian Air Force F-5EM Tiger on take off. (Image © Ralph Blok)

A soccer game usually lasts only 90 minutes, but for the Força Aérea Brasileira, it will be game on until well after the final world cup match on 13 July. All air traffic around the soccer stadiums will be monitored and controlled from a Master Command and Control Room in Rio de Janeiro, and F-5EM Tiger and A-29 Super Tucano aircraft will be used to intercept any unknowns. Also, Embraer E-99 surveillance aircraft are watching and UH-60L Blackhawk helicopters will be on standby.

The areas around the stadiums are temporary no-fly zones and designated Terminal Control Areas (TMA). The most closely guarded airspace is a red sector with a 4 miles radius around each stadium, followed by a yellow zone with a 7 miles radius. All unidentified aircraft within those sectors will be intercepted, says the Brazilian Air Force. On intercept by either F-5EMs or A29s, rocking the wings will the universal signal to tresspassing pilots to follow the Força Aérea Brasileira aircraft out of the no fly zone.

The Embraer A-29 Super Tucano in Brazilian Air Force service (Image © Embraer)
The Embraer A-29 Super Tucano in Brazilian Air Force service (Image © Embraer)

Hermes 900 unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) will also be used during the world cup. The control center in Rio de Janeiro is also responsible for handling commercial and business flights to all host cities for the world cup.

If your Portuguese is up to standard, this YouTube video explains more.

© 2014 AIRheads’ editor Elmer van Hest

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