U.S. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Micah Smith, 135th Electronic Attack Squadron flight captain, Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Washington, directs the pilot of an EA-18G Growler out of a parking spot prior to a training mission, 29 January 2014, at Nellis Air Force Base (Image © Airman 1st Class Joshua Kleinholz / USAF)

100th Growler, but US Navy pleads for more

U.S. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Micah Smith, 135th Electronic Attack Squadron flight captain, Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Washington, directs the pilot of an EA-18G Growler out of a parking spot prior to a training mission, 29 January 2014, at Nellis Air Force Base (Image © Airman 1st Class Joshua Kleinholz / USAF)
USN Petty Officer 3rd Class Micah Smith, 135th Electronic Attack Squadron flight captain, Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Washington, directs the pilot of an EA-18G Growler out of a parking spot prior to a training mission during Red Flag 14-01, 29 January 2014, at Nellis Air Force Base (Image © Airman 1st Class Joshua Kleinholz / USAF)

The US Navy received its 100th Boeing (McDonnell Douglas) EA-18G Growler tactical jamming and electronic warfare jet on 5 May 2014. But the American maritime strike force wants more.

As we reported earlier the US Navy put 22 Growlers on its list of unfunded priorities for the 2015 Fiscal Year budget. Not only wants the force to make sure they will have enough airplanes of the type in the near future, a final approval of the 22 EA-18Gs will also keep Boeing’s Hornet production line open. After all, the Growler is a direct derivative of the F/A-18 Super Hornet.

Current orders take Growler and Super Hornet production through the end of 2016, according to Boeing. During testimony on 27 March 2014 to the US Senate Armed Services Committee, Admiral Jonathan Greenert, chief of naval operations, described the Growler as an “extraordinary capability” and emphasized the need for more aircraft.

Source: Boeing

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