The latest Royal Norwegian Air Force C-130J Super Hercules that was delivered as attrition to the one lost in Sweden. (Image © Lockheed Martin)

After the crash: Norway buys extra C-130J support

The latest Royal Norwegian Air Force C-130J Super Hercules that was delivered as attrition to the one lossed in Sweden. (Image © Lockheed Martin)
The latest Royal Norwegian Air Force C-130J Super Hercules that was delivered as attrition to the one lost in Sweden. (Image © Lockheed Martin)

The new Norwegian government is fairly quick in its reaction to the October 23 official report that the training, documentation and procedures of its own air force were partly to blame in the crash of a RNoAF Super Hercules against the highest Swedish mountain on 15 March 2012.

Oslo now requested to technical, engineering, and software support for its C-130J aircraft for an estimated cost of US$ 107 million. The package will include familiarization training for the Portable Flight Planning System (PFPS) and Joint Mission Planning System (JMPS), spare and repair parts.

The principal contractors will be Lockheed Martin Corporation, DBA Lockheed Martin Aeronautics in Marietta, Georgia; Rolls Royce Corporation in Indianapolis, Indiana; and GE Aviation Systems LLC, DBA Dowty Propellers in Sterling, Virginia.

According to the official report of the Swedish Accident Investigation Committee (Haverikommission) inexperienced and not proper functioning air traffic controllers at both main ATC in Stockholm and at Kiruna Airport in the north of the country were also contributing big time in not helping the five Royal Norwegian Air Force personnel on board of the C-130J. They all perished when the plane hit the Kebnekaise mountain.

Norway operates four Lockheed Martin C-130J Hercules tactical transport aircraft, which fly with 335 Squadron out of Oslo-Gardermoen.

Source: DSCA / Haverikomssion with additional reporting by AIRheads’ Marcel Burger

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See also our Overview: Royal Norwegian Air Force