Goodbye to South Korean Hawks & Talons

The Republic of Korea Air Force (ROKAF) is saying good bye to its Hawk Mk67s. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The Republic of Korea Air Force (ROKAF) is saying goodbye to its Hawk Mk67s. The aircraft above is one of ten now registered in the US. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

The Republic of Korea Air Force (ROKAF) is getting rid of its twenty year old British Aerospace Hawk Mk67 aircraft, as ten of them showed up on the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) register last week. The aircraft are reportedly owned by AirUSA in Nevada. The ROKAF is replacing these Hawks with indigenous developed and built T-50 Golden Hawk aircraft. AIRheads↑FLY visited South Korea years ago, the faboulous dish of kimchi being our main target. Oh, and we saw some of those Hawks as well.

The ROKAF Hawk were based at Yecheon airbase in central South Korea. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The ROKAF Hawk were stationed at Yecheon airbase in central South Korea. Deliveries began in 1993. This aircraft is caught landing at its homebase in autumn 2004. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The camouflage on these aircraft was as striking as the dayglow parts. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The camouflage on these aircraft was as striking as the orange dayglow parts. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

Talon
Not only did the Koreans say goodbye to the Hawks, they did the very same to the thirty Northrop T-38A Talons that were leased from the US. In South Korea, these trainers also used Yecheon as their homebase. Over the last few years, the Talons returned stateside, where they returned flying in USAF service. Most of them are now operating from Holloman AFB, NM.

The dayglow was also found on the T-38A Talons in South Korea. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The orange dayglow was also found on the T-38A Talons in South Korea. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The Hawks and T-38 shared the runway at Yecheon airbase. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
The Hawks and T-38 shared the runway at Yecheon airbase. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
T-38s are gone from South Korean skies, but continue training pilots in many countries. (Image © Elmer van Hest)
T-38s are gone from South Korean skies, but continue to train pilots in many countries. (Image © Elmer van Hest)

And what replaces both the Hawks and Talons is the Korea Aircraft Industries (KAI) T-50; a state of the art two-seater that is capable of supersonic speeds. The T-50 is flying in substantial numbers in South Korea now, and recently the first aircraft were delivered to Indonesia.

Seen landing at Sacheon is the second KAI T-50 prototype. The installation over the exhaust houses an anti spin dragchute. (Image © Dennis Spronk)
This is the second KAI T-50 prototype, seen in October 2004. (Image © Dennis Spronk)

 

© 2013 AIRheads’ Elmer van Hest

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