Two A-10C Thunderbolt II aircraft pilots fly in formation during a training exercise March 16, at Moody Air Force, Ga. (Image © Airman 1st Class Benjamin Wiseman / USAF)

A-10 fleet gets new wings for another 30 years

Two A-10C Thunderbolt II aircraft pilots fly in formation during a training exercise March 16, at Moody Air Force, Ga. (Image © Airman 1st Class Benjamin Wiseman / USAF)
Two A-10C Thunderbolt II aircraft pilots fly in formation during a training exercise March 16, at Moody Air Force, Ga. (Image © Airman 1st Class Benjamin Wiseman / USAF)

The US Air Force is continuing to prepare to keep the Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II attack aircraft for at least 30 years more in service. It just gave a follow-on order of 56 new wings to the Boeing company.

Boeing is now on contract to build up to 242 new wings for the strong close air support aircraft that was deemed to disappear 25 years ago. But then the A-10s performed majestically well against Iraqi armour during the 1990-1991 Persian Gulf War and the American generals decided to keep this formidable air weapon.

Refitting the fleet of up to 395 aircraft with new wings will improve the mission availability of A-10s by an estimated 4 percent and will help save the Air Force an estimated $1.3 billion in maintenance costs during the next 30 years, says Boeing.

This latest order is valued at $212 million. Including this agreement, the Air Force has ordered 173 wings. The efforts of Boeing, its suppliers, and the Air Force will allow the A-10 fleet to operate into 2035.

The A-10 is a twin-engine jet designed for close air support of ground forces. It can be used against all ground targets, including tanks and other armored vehicles.

Source: Boeing